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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
After riding and 26" hardtail for years and a 26" GT Idrive for a few months I decided to give the 29er a shot. After searching for a "deal" I came across a newly built Karate Monkey (frame looks like an 06) for $700. It came with xt front and rear with lx shifters and hydrolics. The wheels and hubs are entry level bontrager and the crank is lx. Overall I am very pleased considering it was more or less never ridden. The frame is one size to big and I had planned to swap it out. But I love the length of the bike and the standover has not made me pay yet.

I am thinking of upgrading the fork. The surly rigid shutters under strain and seems to have no give. Are there more pliable rigids available or do I need to look at a suspension. Being that it is an 06 I may not have clearance and certainly do not want to increase the standover. Frankly the comfort is not an issue, I just feel like I lose control at speed in rough sections and am a bit more timid than I may be with a suspension. The big thing though is that I love the way it corners, how much of this do you lose with suspension.

Overall it's been a blast.
 

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meh... whatever
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you will get more compliance by going tubeless and dropping the psi. if you still need more find an 80mm 29er squishy fork.

as far as it shuddering under strain, i ride my monkey very, very hard and @ 6'3" and about 200# in gear do not experience that at all. perhaps the headset is not properly tightened?

enjoy your km, they're a blast!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Headset

How can I test if the headset is tightened properly? It has not give when I test it in the shop? (basically I hold my hand on the bottom of the headset and see if there is any movement under strain and there does not seem to be). Anyway, thanks for your reply.

Oh, I am judging from you post that tubeless tires are more forgiving? How so?
 

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You mentioned in your 1st post that you have hydraulic brakes, and those are normally disc brakes. Disc brakes need to have the disc pads (inside the calipers) wear into the disc rotors (attached to the wheel hub). This is called "bedding" the pads to the rotor. This is most easily done by riding your bike up to speed and evenly applying the brakes. This may take 10-20 or more cycles. You will notice that your brakes become more effective as they bed in.

Good luck,
Mud
 
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