Mountain Bike Reviews Forum banner
1 - 20 of 21 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello all,

New to the forum and I have a question about compact med kits that would fit in a saddle bag or in the hydration pack. Do you guys know of any that you prefer over the other, and why? Do you think making your own kit is the best route?

Thanks in advance for your replies.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
87 Posts
rabidchicken said:
Just throw some gauze pads and some tape in a zip lock bag and take a first aid class.
Add super glue, duct tape, and maybe a little bottle of rubbing alcohol. alcohol to clean cuts and super glue to close them up. Duct tape is just good to have anyway.
 

·
LCI #1853
Joined
·
328 Posts
Some good ideas here, and it fits in a zip-lock bag. I carry something like this when just out riding around by myself : http://www.utahmountainbiking.com/firstaid/bikekit.htm.

When out on NMBP patrol, or teaching the League Smart Cycling classes, I pack along something like this: http://www.adventuremedicalkits.com/product.php?product=124&catname=Light & Fast&prodname=Trail .

What you carry is going to depend on 1) your personal skills at administering first aid to yourself and others, and 2) how far away you are going to be from help. Some folks get by with just a cell phone in the jersey pocket; others carry full EMT kit. The best answer is somewhere in the middle...
 

·
Go back to school
Joined
·
648 Posts
+1 on super glue. It works very well for in-field temp. stitches. That plus some gauze and bandaids and your good to go.

My best advice however would be get some gear. Some elbow/forearm guards and full finger gloves is good for an every day ride. We wear full faced helmets when doing the more aggressive downhills.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
811 Posts
ortrigger said:
Add super glue, duct tape, and maybe a little bottle of rubbing alcohol. alcohol to clean cuts and super glue to close them up. Duct tape is just good to have anyway.
Bikesair said:
+1 on super glue. It works very well for in-field temp. stitches. That plus some gauze and bandaids and your good to go.
Have you guys actually used super glue on a wound? Speaking from experience or just repeating what you read on the web? This is some of the worst advice ever for the following reasons:

1) Closing a wound in the field without thoroughly cleaning and debriding it will only contribute to infection. The average non-medically trained person will not get the wound properly debrided or cleaned in the field environment.

2) If your wound is bad enough to need some type of closure or medical treatment, then you will likely need stitches. When you show up in the ER, you are going to go through hell as the medical staff attempts to remove the glue in order to clean and suture the wound.

3) The average person is not trained to close and approximate a wound properly. Improperly closing the wound can lead to delayed healing, excess scar formation, or cellulitis.

Direct pressure with gauze and professional treatment will work best. Don't glue your wounds.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,173 Posts
I carry various band aids, gauze pads, bandages (both sterile and elastic), iodine ointment, cooling spray for bruises, 95% alcohol, glucose pills, massage cream. More or less covers my needs, fits into a small bag inside a pocket of my waist bag.
Antibacterial glue was very popular in the Sovyet Union back in late 70's and early 80's, if my memory still serves me. The fashion passed once it became clear, that wounds would heal much slower under a layer of glue.
 

·
Probably drunk right now
Joined
·
6,753 Posts
I agree...

rabidchicken said:
Have you guys actually used super glue on a wound? Speaking from experience or just repeating what you read on the web? This is some of the worst advice ever for the following reasons:

1) Closing a wound in the field without thoroughly cleaning and debriding it will only contribute to infection. The average non-medically trained person will not get the wound properly debrided or cleaned in the field environment.

2) If your wound is bad enough to need some type of closure or medical treatment, then you will likely need stitches. When you show up in the ER, you are going to go through hell as the medical staff attempts to remove the glue in order to clean and suture the wound.

3) The average person is not trained to close and approximate a wound properly. Improperly closing the wound can lead to delayed healing, excess scar formation, or cellulitis.

Direct pressure with gauze and professional treatment will work best. Don't glue your wounds.
I agree. There aren't many instances where gluing yourself back together makes sense. The worst cut I received mountain bike severed an artery. On one hand, it was pretty cool watching blood shoot out of my arm with every heartbeat. On the other hand, bleeding out isn't very good. I rode back to the trailhead, irragated the wound, applied a butterfly bandage and continued my ride. I don't think I would have considered supergluing the cut.

The entire right front side of my bike was pink, from the grips, down the stem, the right side of the fork and my right shin. That was kind of cool too.
 

·
Enthusiast
Joined
·
5,360 Posts
Sometimes I will carry a couple of 5x9 trauma dressings (aka "combi pads") and a few rolls of roller gauze (aka "kling" or "kerlix"). The trauma dressings will unfold to cover a fair bit of road rash. Or you can leave them folded for smaller wounds. The roller gauze works pretty well for securing a dressing in place.

If necessary, I figure I would use the water in my hydration pack for irrigating a wound. Having someone squeeze the pack can give added pressure for cleaning.

In a few cases where I've felt the need, I've tossed in a SAM splint, and also some triangle bandages.

I'm not much for band-aids. A wound small enough for a band-aid can probably wait until I get back to the car.

I probably should carry a more complete kit in my car...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
87 Posts
^^When I said to take super glue I meant for it to be used for small cuts. It doesn't take much more room than a bandaid and there's less garbage. Obviously, if the cut needs stitches the rider should take the direct pressure/professional treatment path.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
811 Posts
ortrigger said:
^^When I said to take super glue I meant for it to be used for small cuts. It doesn't take much more room than a bandaid and there's less garbage. Obviously, if the cut needs stitches the rider should take the direct pressure/professional treatment path.
Either way super glue on a wound is a bad idea. Bandaids are pretty useless in a first aid kit. Wounds small enough for a bandaid will likely be fine left open to air.

I'm not trying to argue but this advice is potentially dangerous.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,360 Posts
Just for kicks I tried the super glue in a small knife slice on my finger. It hurt like HELL!


What super glue is good for is when you cut or burn a finger you can put a band aid with some neosporen or whatever over the cut. Then wrap the finger with cloth athletic tape. Then use the super glue to secure the seems of the tape and glue it to your finger at the edge of the tape. Then put a rubber finger condom over this and your good to go.

I'm a chef and I've used this method on myself and others in various kitchens countless times. By the end of the shift the glue has weakened enough that you can remove the bandage. It works great to protect a cut or born and to keep it clean.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,173 Posts
rabidchicken said:
Bandaids are pretty useless in a first aid kit. Wounds small enough for a bandaid will likely be fine left open to air.
It depends. If you ride alone, you may have hard time putting a bandage on your right (provided you are a right-hander) arm. Then a band aid will come in handy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
242 Posts
I do a lot of hiking and have taken some outdoor medicine courses.

If it were me, and it has been, I'd either order one of these:

http://www.helenbacfirstaid.com/Personal-First-Aid-Kits.html

(the top one has the basics and is very lightweight).

Or, just look at the contents and build your own.

Since lacerations are a big issue in mountain biking, on a long trip you could consider carrying an irrigation syringe and a possibly even an hemostatic agent such as:

http://www.helenbacfirstaid.com/Survival-Preparedness.htm

Hopefully you'll never have to use either - save for some scratches.....
 

·
Go back to school
Joined
·
648 Posts
rabidchicken said:
Have you guys actually used super glue on a wound? Speaking from experience or just repeating what you read on the web? This is some of the worst advice ever for the following reasons:

1) Closing a wound in the field without thoroughly cleaning and debriding it will only contribute to infection. The average non-medically trained person will not get the wound properly debrided or cleaned in the field environment.

2) If your wound is bad enough to need some type of closure or medical treatment, then you will likely need stitches. When you show up in the ER, you are going to go through hell as the medical staff attempts to remove the glue in order to clean and suture the wound.

3) The average person is not trained to close and approximate a wound properly. Improperly closing the wound can lead to delayed healing, excess scar formation, or cellulitis.

Direct pressure with gauze and professional treatment will work best. Don't glue your wounds.
I wouldn't suggest it if I hadn't done it myself. In addition my doctor has glued me together in the office. I had the choice between 7 stitches (less of a scar) and glue (more of a scar). When I consulted him on the use of super glue he said it's fine and is much like his glue however his guaranteed sterile with some additives.

As for size I would hope that it could be judged by the person. Good luck gluing a 50 stitch gash together :thumbsup: However I have had great success by closing my cut and hitting it with some glue. Anything bigger than a bandaid but less than stitches is where glue can work very well.

Infection can be avoided by using a brand new stick of glue and medical purpose glue which actually has anti-bacterial additives. Of coarse cleaning can be difficult in the middle of nowhere.

If you don't believe me here is a good article.
http://www.wisegeek.com/can-i-really-use-superglue-to-close-my-wound.htm

I love the "possible but not advisable" line...just like everything else I do.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
811 Posts
Bikesair said:
I wouldn't suggest it if I hadn't done it myself. In addition my doctor has glued me together in the office. I had the choice between 7 stitches (less of a scar) and glue (more of a scar). When I consulted him on the use of super glue he said it's fine and is much like his glue however his guaranteed sterile with some additives.

As for size I would hope that it could be judged by the person. Good luck gluing a 50 stitch gash together :thumbsup: However I have had great success by closing my cut and hitting it with some glue. Anything bigger than a bandaid but less than stitches is where glue can work very well.

Infection can be avoided by using a brand new stick of glue and medical purpose glue which actually has anti-bacterial additives. Of coarse cleaning can be difficult in the middle of nowhere.

If you don't believe me here is a good article.
http://www.wisegeek.com/can-i-really-use-superglue-to-close-my-wound.htm

I love the "possible but not advisable" line...just like everything else I do.
The article you linked to makes it very clear why it is a bad idea to use it. You can buy dermabond (the medical superglue), but it is around $30 per vial. You can also by suture material online, but that doesn't mean the person using it is qualified to suture.

The best advice still for a wound requiring closure is direct pressure with sterile gauze and get medical attention. My advice doesn't come from the internet, it comes from experience as a combat medic, combat lifesaver instructor, and EMT instructor.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Discussion Starter · #19 · (Edited)
otis24 said:
tampons work great for plugging gun shot entrance holes.
A small roll of stretched gauze works well for that too. Keep plugn' that hole til it fills up. I'll make sure to carry some quick clot (burns so goood), Israeli bandages, Z-pak dressing, and tourniquets, as well. I'm so hardcore that other mountain bikers shoot at me because they're so jealous of my mad skills.
 

·
Biker 4 Life
Joined
·
118 Posts
I prefer to make my own med kit and mine consists of:

(x1) small antiseptic spray bottle
(x2) 4"x4" gauze pads
(x3) 2"x3" non-stick sterile pads
(x2) antiseptic whipes
(x5) small triple antibiotic oinment packs
(x2) max strength non-aspirin
(x2) extra strength pain away tablets
(x2) Ibuprofen
(x2) sinus relief tablets
(x1) single roll of medi-Rip self adherent bandage (3"x 5 yards)
(x1) Tweezers
(x1) small medical scissors
(x4) assorted bandaides

Looks like a lot of stuff but its really not and all of it is worth having on a ride.
 
1 - 20 of 21 Posts
Top