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I demoed a Tallboy 4 for a couple of days last October when deciding between that bike and the Hightower 2. I ended up going with the Hightower 2 because it climbed as well and it was a blast on the descents.


The differentiation between those bikes would be around the 2 hour mark, where the slightly lighter weight and 120mm travel would have the Tallboy 4 pulling away from a Hightower 2 on the climbs.


The Tallboy 4 was like a mini enduro bike. Very slack and capable, not quite as agile as the Following. Seriously fast on techy descents for a 120mm bike. It's also a great bike, I'm sure I would have a hard time choosing between the two.


The Evil's Delta suspension was better than SC's VPP, especially climbing (and I was a Santa Cruz fanboy for years).


The only nitpick I had w/the Evil was the relatively steep HA. I was actually thinking that I would have preferred a slacker HA like the TB4's while riding the Following, but the geo of the bike is what makes it handle so well.


I think a 140mm fork on the Evil would be where it's at for my local terrain.


Edit: the Evil had a RS Pike Ultimate 130mm. Running same fork @ 160mm on my Levo SL.


It's the best fork I've ridden to date. Have run early gen lyrik/Pike, Fox 32/34/36, Manitou, Lefty, Girvin, Headshok*


That's very helpful - thanks! A couple more specific questions if you have another second.


(1) Do you have a sense of just how much the following gives up to the TB on steep, techy downs? My 120 bike will be my only ride, and I do like that kind of terrain.

(2) It makes sense that, with its steeper angles, the following would be more agile. What about getting it into the air? For a 120 bike, I do want something that's poppy and likes bonus features etc. I know this is a big selling point of the following, but it also mentioned a lot in TB reviews. Is there a noticeable difference between the two there?

(3) Something a lot of reviews of the TB mention is its cornering, and in particular its traction through corners. Does the following keep up in that department?
Thanks again!
 

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What is the range of Torques called out on the components for the Following V3? I want to make sure that I have a decent torque wrench of the proper range for maintenance/changes/minor assembly, etc...
Thanks !
 

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That's very helpful - thanks! A couple more specific questions if you have another second.


(1) Do you have a sense of just how much the following gives up to the TB on steep, techy downs? My 120 bike will be my only ride, and I do like that kind of terrain.

The TB is definitely more capable/faster on steep,techy downs. It's the geo of the bikes that seperate them.
I would feel comfortable taking the TB to Angel Fire (bike park in NM) , riding blues, some blacks with jumps, drops but would rent a bike if I owned the Following

(2) It makes sense that, with its steeper angles, the following would be more agile. What about getting it into the air? For a 120 bike, I do want something that's poppy and likes bonus features etc. I know this is a big selling point of the following, but it also mentioned a lot in TB reviews. Is there a noticeable difference between the two there?


I didn't experience much airtime with the Following for the time I had it. I'm sure it would be fine for moderate features/jumps.

(3) Something a lot of reviews of the TB mention is its cornering, and in particular its traction through corners. Does the following keep up in that department?

The Hightower2 and the TB cornered on rails. The Following was also good, but the SC bikes were next level. The steep seat angle and slack front end put me in the perfect "in the bike" position to adjust weighting the front and rear wheel of the bike.


BTW, the Following Delta suspension platform is more 'refined' for lack of a better term, but the SC VPP is imo more suited for bigger terrain/hits.

This is alll subjective opinion, I'd demo the bikes if at all possible. YMMV

...
 

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Ok gents. Finally decided to put my money where my mouth is. Following v3 frame arrives next week to replace my Knolly fugitive and compliment my Ripmo v2
 

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Wow...after my maiden voyage on my Following V3, I'm impressed and certainly satisfied with my decisions!

I don't have much frame of reference to compare the bike to, other than the 2017 Fuse Expert 27.5+ that it replaced...but after a quick initial adjustment period for the taller, lighter, faster feel, I rode my local baseline trail.

The bike felt much more comfortable and compliant for me, was fast, agile and confidence inspiring. I was expecting that based on the reviews, but even after reading the reviews I was surprised at how easily it went uphill! Short climbs that I had to work for on my Fuse were instantly gobbled up by the FV3...and the additional traction was noticeable.

Like I said...I don't have a huge frame of reference...and I'm certain that there are bikes that climb better...but this bike was able to take a broken down fat middle-aged guy and drag me up hills that would have made me stop, gasp for breath and/or take a break on my old bike (which wasn't a total slouch)...and no...it wasn't improved fitness or form...I had been without a bike for about a month while making my decision and waiting for delivery...

I'm looking forward to getting back out there again!
 

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Get Down Do you
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I am sure some of you saw this one but if not it's a great review. They did not speak this highly of other bikes in the roundup.
 

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If anyone is looking and having a hard time tracking down a large V3 there's a new one for sale on Pinkbike, seller says he has buyer's remorse.
 

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I demoed a Tallboy 4 for a couple of days last October when deciding between that bike and the Hightower 2. I ended up going with the Hightower 2 because it climbed as well and it was a blast on the descents.

The differentiation between those bikes would be around the 2 hour mark, where the slightly lighter weight and 120mm travel would have the Tallboy 4 pulling away from a Hightower 2 on the climbs.

The Tallboy 4 was like a mini enduro bike. Very slack and capable, not quite as agile as the Following. Seriously fast on techy descents for a 120mm bike. It's also a great bike, I'm sure I would have a hard time choosing between the two.

The Evil's Delta suspension was better than SC's VPP, especially climbing (and I was a Santa Cruz fanboy for years).

The only nitpick I had w/the Evil was the relatively steep HA. I was actually thinking that I would have preferred a slacker HA like the TB4's while riding the Following, but the geo of the bike is what makes it handle so well.

I think a 140mm fork on the Evil would be where it's at for my local terrain.

Edit: the Evil had a RS Pike Ultimate 130mm. Running same fork @ 160mm on my Levo SL.

It's the best fork I've ridden to date. Have run early gen lyrik/Pike, Fox 32/34/36, Manitou, Lefty, Girvin, Headshok*
Could you elaborate on the climbing characteristics/capabilities of the v3 following vs the V4 Tallboy? And possibly frame size feel of each?

I’m a current own a medium (5’7” rider) V4 Tallboy and I’m thinking of swapping to the new following. I have no major complaints with the TB. The VPP platform was a bit firm on small bumps, but swapping to a cane creek inline coil shock remedied that issue.

My biggest concern would be giving up anything in the climbing/traction department. I’ve also read this bike rides big so I might need to size down to a small. Aside from the reach numbers, the medium following is close in geo numbers to my current medium V4 TB.

Thanks in advance.
 

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I am considering a frame build on a following. I'm confused as to why people wouldn't like the superboost rear? It looks stout AF and it still has super short chainstays, is this all because you can't run your current boost wheels on it? Being a heavier rider at 220 lbs that stout rear end in a 120mm is a big draw for me.

Does anyone know the spoke count on the i9 enduro S wheels they spec on this bike? Are they the 28 spoke, according the i9's site it's looking like they are. Any feedback on this wheelset?
 

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I am considering a frame build on a following. I'm confused as to why people wouldn't like the superboost rear? It looks stout AF and it still has super short chainstays, is this all because you can't run your current boost wheels on it? Being a heavier rider at 220 lbs that stout rear end in a 120mm is a big draw for me.

Does anyone know the spoke count on the i9 enduro S wheels they spec on this bike? Are they the 28 spoke, according the i9's site it's looking like they are. Any feedback on this wheelset?
I should start by saying that I’m with you with respect to SB+. That said, the pushback from many re: this standard is the belief that it’s a new standard. It doesn’t help that it was [re]introduced relatively shortly after after boost came to market. Boost, while truly new, also had the benefit of the ability to fit a 142mm hub into a boost frame via spacers on the NDS of the axle/hub. I don’t believe I’ve seen a similar setup for SB+. This means, as you suggested, that would-be evil, devinci, pivot or salsa buyers can’t simply swap wheel sets or cranks from their non-boost or boost bikes.

What I find odd is that there didn’t seem to be this much pushback against boost, which was introduced while both 142mm and 157mm standards were already well established.

SB+ took an existing hub width standard and added flange spacing. There was at least one hub manufacturer (king I think) who already had SB+ flange spacing on their 157mm hubs long before superboost+ was a thing.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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28 front, 28 rear. Even given the lower spoke count, I'd describe the wheels as feeling more stiff than compliant. The rear hub sounds incredible - although it would be nice to be able to tone down the volume at times.
I noticed some tugging at the pedals in slow chunky stuff, which I attributed to the high engagement of the hub and the pedal kickback in the suspension design, but I think the real fix for that is just to go faster (and this bike makes that easy).


I am considering a frame build on a following. I'm confused as to why people wouldn't like the superboost rear? It looks stout AF and it still has super short chainstays, is this all because you can't run your current boost wheels on it? Being a heavier rider at 220 lbs that stout rear end in a 120mm is a big draw for me.

Does anyone know the spoke count on the i9 enduro S wheels they spec on this bike? Are they the 28 spoke, according the i9's site it's looking like they are. Any feedback on this wheelset?
 

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28 front, 28 rear. Even given the lower spoke count, I'd describe the wheels as feeling more stiff than compliant. The rear hub sounds incredible - although it would be nice to be able to tone down the volume at times.
I noticed some tugging at the pedals in slow chunky stuff, which I attributed to the high engagement of the hub and the pedal kickback in the suspension design, but I think the real fix for that is just to go faster (and this bike makes that easy).
Cool, thanks for the feedback. I recently went from 28 to 32 on my jeffsy and I loved the stiffer wheel but it's also a 27.5 so maybe i'd like the 28's on a 29er.
 

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Has anyone tried the new V3 with a coil?
If so, Is it still as poppy and what is the climbing performance like
 

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Has anyone found a frame for less than 3299? Wondering if i’ll be able to find any deals black friday.
 

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I’ve got a medium protein powder frame for sale with only 5 miles on the frame. $2800 shipped and insured. Silver pike ultimate 130mm 51offset for $500 or a trust message for $650.
 
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