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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi everyone

I am not sure if I'm posting this in the right place, but I just wanted to share my experience, so more people can see it as sort of a warning...

I recently purchased two pairs of 29" DT Swiss mountain bike rims - two of the EX 511 model, which as far as I am aware, is considered to be their best and strongest (also most expensive) alloy enduro rim. I also bought two XM 481 rims (all mountain category), for a lighter wheelset build. These are probably not the most high-end rims ever, but are the top of the line of the alloy DT Swiss rims, and cost over 80 euros for a rim.

I was quite disappointed, to find out that the EX 511 rims, which should weigh around 570 grams, actually were both over 600 grams - one was 602g, and the other was 608g.
The XM 481 rims also were off by a significant amount - they should be around 525 grams, but the rims I got were 552g and 567g.

My scale isn't wrong, I tried four other different scales, just to make sure that I'm not being crazy. I weighed them without the washers and nipples, of course.

So, just have that in mind if you're considering buying DT Swiss rims...
 

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Hi everyone

I am not sure if I'm posting this in the right place, but I just wanted to share my experience, so more people can see it as sort of a warning...

I recently purchased two pairs of 29" DT Swiss mountain bike rims - two of the EX 511 model, which as far as I am aware, is considered to be their best and strongest (also most expensive) alloy enduro rim. I also bought two XM 481 rims (all mountain category), for a lighter wheelset build. These are probably not the most high-end rims ever, but are the top of the line of the alloy DT Swiss rims, and cost over 80 euros for a rim.

I was quite disappointed, to find out that the EX 511 rims, which should weigh around 570 grams, actually were both over 600 grams - one was 602g, and the other was 608g.
The XM 481 rims also were off by a significant amount - they should be around 525 grams, but the rims I got were 552g and 567g.

My scale isn't wrong, I tried four other different scales, just to make sure that I'm not being crazy. I weighed them without the washers and nipples, of course.

So, just have that in mind if you're considering buying DT Swiss rims...
They could weight 700-800 grams a rim and I'd still rock them without question. I've abused 511s and 471s for years on multiple bikes and have yet to throw one on a truing stand.
 

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Perfectly normal. Most manufacturers say stated rim weights are +/- 5%. In my experience, they are never -5%, but frequently +5%. Welcome to the bike world where stated weights are often stated lies.
 

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Unfortunately, that's pretty normal. Some of the wheels I built up were off also. Personally, I'd take a heavier rim that's more durable than a lighter one I'm messing with to keep true.

Don't weigh the tires you'll be putting on either. You'll be disappointed again.
 

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I'm rolling on XM481's on my hardtail. They've been totally bomber. I'd buy them again. I never bothered to weigh them and compare them to what DT Swiss stated, as the weight of them doesn't matter as much as how well they do the job. They were dead true out of the box, and they're still dead true. Built them myself (first wheel build) and only had them in a truing stand once after that for a tension check after around 100mi.
 

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Perfectly normal. Most manufacturers say stated rim weights are +/- 5%. In my experience, they are never -5%, but frequently +5%. Welcome to the bike world where stated weights are often stated lies.
Let's be 100% fair, they give a range because are off. Some scales are more accurate than others. The scales accuracy also depends on the scales range.
Some scales deal with weights at either end of the limits better than others.
Just saying he got the same reading on 4 scales has me doubtful. I have a few at the house and parts I weigh don't read the same on all of them.

The descrepancy he mentions is 5.25% off. Not that bad.
 

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Perfectly normal. Most manufacturers say stated rim weights are +/- 5%. In my experience, they are never -5%, but frequently +5%. Welcome to the bike world where stated weights are often stated lies.
Aluminum rims are made by extruding aluminum through dies that are shaped like the cross section of the rim. These dies wear as hundreds, thousands of rims worth of aluminum are extruded through them. As the dies wear, they get bigger and bigger, so the cross section of the rims get thicker and thicker. The lightest rims will the first off the line after a new rim is designed. Buy the same rim later in the life of a die, it's only going to get heavier. At some point the manufacturer might replace the worn dies (maybe when it exceeds +5%, maybe later/never for some, we don't know), but as a consumer who can't track how the weight changes with each shipment, you aren't going to know when.
 

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Let's be 100% fair, they give a range because are off. Some scales are more accurate than others. The scales accuracy also depends on the scales range.
Some scales deal with weights at either end of the limits better than others.
Just saying he got the same reading on 4 scales has me doubtful. I have a few at the house and parts I weigh don't read the same on all of them.

The descrepancy he mentions is 5.25% off. Not that bad.
Correct, we don't know the accuracy of his scale. I do know the accuracy of mine, as I use a calibrated 500g weight to confirm calibration prior to weighing items (yes, I am anal). In my limited weighing of a few dozen rims, I have never had one come in underweight, always at or above. Bike manufacturers tend to understate weights as many buyers are very weight driven. They know if they say their 30mm rim weighs 20g less than their competitors, they will sell more. They know tht few purchasers will weigh their products, and fewer will return if the stated weight is not accurate.

I generally expect rims to weigh 20-40 grams more than advertised. I recently had a rim that was advertised at 450 grams come in at 550. It got returned as it was for a friend's cross country hardtail and we were trying to keep the weight down. If we were going to use a 550 gram rim, I figured at least get a strong one (we ended up with a 500 gram from another company that was stronger, but not as heavy).
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 · (Edited)
As I mentioned, I checked my rims on different scales - my own kitchen scale, a friend's kitchen scale, a local bike shop's scale, and also asked if I can use the scale in two local food shops / corner shops (sorry if my english is a bit silly). The difference between all scales was between 1-3 grams.
I have talked to others who have bought the same rims, and some of them said their EX 511's are over 600 grams as well, others say theirs weigh as stated by DT Swiss. I also talked to someone who had built his wheels with XM 481, and he said his rims were 525 grams, as per specification. Here's an image of one XM 481 rim on r2-bike's own scale - https://r2-bike.com/media/image/product/89013/lg/dt-swiss-rim-29-xm-481~5.jpg So, apparently, it is possible for these rims to weigh as specified. This is what makes me feel the worst, if ALL rims weigh more than the specs, than ok, I accept that it is what it is. But some weigh more and others weigh less, and you can't know what you're gonna get, and it really sucks when you get the heaviest ones...

xcandrew's explanation makes sense. I get that some difference in weight is to be expected. In my case, one rim is off my 8% (567 instead of 525), I consider this a bit too much. "Swiss precision" my a$$.
 

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Hi everyone

I am not sure if I'm posting this in the right place, but I just wanted to share my experience, so more people can see it as sort of a warning...

I recently purchased two pairs of 29" DT Swiss mountain bike rims - two of the EX 511 model, which as far as I am aware, is considered to be their best and strongest (also most expensive) alloy enduro rim. I also bought two XM 481 rims (all mountain category), for a lighter wheelset build. These are probably not the most high-end rims ever, but are the top of the line of the alloy DT Swiss rims, and cost over 80 euros for a rim.

I was quite disappointed, to find out that the EX 511 rims, which should weigh around 570 grams, actually were both over 600 grams - one was 602g, and the other was 608g.
The XM 481 rims also were off by a significant amount - they should be around 525 grams, but the rims I got were 552g and 567g.

My scale isn't wrong, I tried four other different scales, just to make sure that I'm not being crazy. I weighed them without the washers and nipples, of course.

So, just have that in mind if you're considering buying DT Swiss rims...
If you are worried about 30g difference maybe you should switch to XC or road riding - in AM/Enduro/DH world usually reliability is way higher than weight on importance scale (except maybe for racers) :D EX511 will survive a lot of bashing while not weighting too much - thats all it matter. About that 30g - just leave sunglasses at home and you are double saving that weight "problem" ... :D
 

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If you are worried about 30g difference maybe you should switch to XC or road riding - in AM/Enduro/DH world usually reliability is way higher than weight on importance scale (except maybe for racers) :D EX511 will survive a lot of bashing while not weighting too much - thats all it matter. About that 30g - just leave sunglasses at home and you are double saving that weight "problem" ... :D
agreed. If you're talking about EX511 rims and XM481 rims, wtf are you doing whining about 30g?

Go hang out in the weight weenie forum instead. For the intended use of these rims, a few extra grams won't be problematic.
 

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When you've found some slightly lighter rims, also make sure that you do the following before going for a ride:
  • Take a dump
  • Squeeze out another micro dump
  • Cut your hair
  • Shave your legs
  • Remove your clothes

Then you'll be SUPER light :)

I love my XM 481s on my XC bike... but then I need something strong to handle my fat ass and all my wipeouts.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Seems like you guys are missing the point. I wouldn't have bought the 481 rims if the weight was described as over 550, and probably many others wouldn't have bought them too. 30-40g of rotational mass in the rims isn't really the same as losing 30g of body weight or gear. But if bashing is all you care about, you probably don't care about climbing performance...
 

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Seems like you guys are missing the point. I wouldn't have bought the 481 rims if the weight was described as over 550, and probably many others wouldn't have bought them too. 30-40g of rotational mass in the rims isn't really the same as losing 30g of body weight or gear. But if bashing is all you care about, you probably don't care about climbing performance...
and maybe you missed the point that it's been true ALWAYS that while underweight bike components do exist, it's far more common for the mfr stated weight to be too low. when you expect the actual weight to be higher, then you're not disappointed when it actually is.

the real problem here is that your expectations differ from reality.
 

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Seems like you guys are missing the point. I wouldn't have bought the 481 rims if the weight was described as over 550, and probably many others wouldn't have bought them too. 30-40g of rotational mass in the rims isn't really the same as losing 30g of body weight or gear. But if bashing is all you care about, you probably don't care about climbing performance...
I can 100% guarantee than my micro dumps are more than 30g... let alone my monster dumps.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
the real problem here is that your expectations differ from reality.
Maybe. Something like this wouldn't surprise me on a €9-10 rim. Shouldn't be the case for a €82 rim. But I do live and work in the poorest country in Europe, so maybe this amount of money is like spare change to you, i just haven't seen it as such...
 

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Maybe. Something like this wouldn't surprise me on a €9-10 rim. Shouldn't be the case for a €82 rim. But I do live and work in the poorest country in Europe, so maybe this amount of money is like spare change to you, i just haven't seen it as such...
post #9 absolutely nailed it. the tooling used to make these rims wears out over time and the weights grow. this happens with a LOT of items. including carbon stuff. you want tighter tolerances? then you have to pay even more for it so the manufacturers can replace their tooling more often.

manufacturer posted weights have always been a suggestion. and they've always been optimistic. believe it or not, they were much more optimistic in the past than they are now.

your whining here will change nothing. go take a micro dump.
 

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Seems like you guys are missing the point. I wouldn't have bought the 481 rims if the weight was described as over 550, and probably many others wouldn't have bought them too. 30-40g of rotational mass in the rims isn't really the same as losing 30g of body weight or gear. But if bashing is all you care about, you probably don't care about climbing performance...
There aren't probably anyone out there but you to buy one of the toughest rims on market and then complain about 30g difference (probably result of production process). If 30g and money is a problem them you have only two choices:
a) sell rims immidiately and buy some lighter under 500g rims (to accomodate possible 30g difference) for less money. Although they will be hard to find :D
b) keep rims and stop complaining as they will be around probably way longer than any under 500g 10 EUR rims you mention (although i doubt they exist...). 30g rotational weight will probably get gain you like 5 sec per hour. Total nonsense in AM/Enduro world... :D

Look like OCD, like you buy Mercedes AMG with 700HP, take huge loan because you cannot really afford it and then complain to manufacturrer that it has only 695 HP and you could be slower by 5 hundreds of second on Nurburgring. The fact that you never go there doesn't matter :D
 
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