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i recently fell victim to a retard driving a wrecker and I was run off the road and flipped my Rover six times through a field. I decided that I would commute on my road bike instead of buying a new car; I've always wanted to do so, and there is no better reason than lack of a vehicle. So, my question to everyone hear is, aside from the warm clothes for North GA winters and some lights for the bike, what else am I forgetting to get for my new found journey?:)
 

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You might want some quick-attach fenders for when the roads are wet. Several companies make ones like this:

http://aebike.com/product/planet-bike-speedez-700c-narrow-quick-on-fender-sku-fe2519-qc30.htm

http://aebike.com/product/axiom-fastback-dlx-reflex-700c-qr-fender-sku-fe6401-qc30.htm

You mentioned lights, so here are a couple additional visibility ideas:

Reflective legbands (I like the Jog-A-Lite ones sold at REI). They move to attract attention and help people figure out what you are.

Reflective hi-vis vest. They go over anything, they don't need lots of washing, and they don't cost too much. I like ones that use glossy prismatic tape since it stays reflective pretty well when wet, whereas satin-finish tape loses some effectiveness: I have this one

I'm also a big fan of my helmet mirror. They don't work for everyone, though.

Do you get to bring your bike inside where it'll be safe, or do you need suggestions on locking?
 

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You also need to remind yourself that what the retard in the wrecker did to you in your Rover will be minor in comparison to what the moron in the minivan, the sh!thead in the SUV, and the Bastard in the BMW can potentially do to you either because they don't see you or specifically because they do. Always take your defensive biking skills with you!
 

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No-Brakes Cougar
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Sorry to hear about your accident, I hope you're OK. The advantage to riding a bike is that you can swerve onto the shoulder or hop a curb to get away from a-hole drivers! I recommend picking back roads and/or roads with wide shoulders and bike lanes if practical.

Let's see, so far we got; warm clothes, lights and fenders. Also, helmet mirror (don't use them myself, but it might be a good idea). How about something to carry your stuff? Some people prefer a rack and panniers, I prefer a backpack myself. Will you be taking a MUP to work or be passing a lot of joggers? If so, you might need a bell. And don't forget about a small tool kit with patch kit, spare tube(s), tire levers, multi-tool, and mini-pump or CO2 inflator.

Good luck and keep us posted on your progress!
 

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Unfortunately, being on the bike will still put you well within reach of idiots behind the wheel. I can count three collisions: a car accelerating past me then making an illegal right turn around me, a car coming towards me then made a hasty left turn in front of me, a car running a stop sign after I'd entered the intersection. Fortunately, I was alert and in enough control to avert any major injuries. But given all that, I still prefer a bike commute to driving in. It's so much more of an enjoyable feeling.

Get some good rain gear and ride alert.
 

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And all that has been said puts the Ipod in the do not use catagory! I've avoided at least as many accidents because I could HEAR what was going on around me as I have though seeing.

Something that you haven't mentioned, and neither has anyone else, would be something in which to carry your work clothes (if necessary), lunch, rain gear, spare tube(s), patch kit, pump, etc. A back pack, frame rack with a trunk bag or panniers. Something like that would be a good idea.

Good Dirt
 

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Squash said:
Something that you haven't mentioned, and neither has anyone else, would be something in which to carry your work clothes (if necessary), lunch, rain gear, spare tube(s), patch kit, pump, etc. A back pack, frame rack with a trunk bag or panniers. Something like that would be a good idea.
Actually, I mentioned it already, but no harm in reiterating.
 

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Your brain: Must stay alert at all times! You won't need to bring a smile, the commute will take care of that (usually for most of the day!). Don't forget your camera, so you can report back to us with interesting shots from time to time.
 

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Puncture resistant tires are a good idea. You will likely be riding in the dark much of the time until spring gets here and it will be hard to see glass or other pointy bits in the road.

Get either a crappy beater bike or a really good lock. Also be sure to lock your bike in a place that gets a lot of foot traffic where it would take a lot of balls to cut it loose and take it.

If it gets cold there, try a merino wool undershirt. They are expensive but are amazing.

Oh...and welcome to the club!

By the way...someone mentioned MUT. It stands for multi use trail.
 

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Everyone pretty much covered it. Awareness is the key to survivability so the iPod thing is something I would have never suggested either. Keep the iPods to the trails and dirt commutes when you're not having to fear for your life if some moron like the guy that cut you off in your Rover comes back around for Round 2. They also make bar-end mirrors if the helmet mirror didn't work out for you. I felt so much better knowing I can at least anticipate someone changing lanes behind me to where I would be sandwiched in the middle of traffic at times. For every headturn, that could be 10ft travelled you didn't see or be able to react upon. Have fun saving gas!
 
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