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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
hey everyone.

I was wondering how good (quality and performance wise) these forks are.

#1: The Marzocchi Drop Off 4 100mm, (its equiped on the 2006 Kona Stuff)

#2: The Marzocchi Dirt Jam Pro 110mm, (its equiped on the 2006 Giant STP1)

#3: The Marzocchi DJ Comp 120mm, (its equiped on the 2006 RM Flow 2.0)

Out of these Forks what would you choose for DJing/urban (and a bit of everything really), the reason i am asking this is because i would like to know from personal experience.

On a side note, which bike would you choose for quality/performance and components:

2006 Kona Stuff
2006 Norco Sasquatch
2006 RM Flow 2.0
2006 Giant STP1

thanks for your time.

Laurence
 

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carpe mañana
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Drop Off 4 has aluminum damper on one side and plastic on the other.
DJ pro has SSV damping
DJ Comp has elastomers

DJ pro is the smallest evil, so to speak. Drop Off would be the lightest, both DJs are boat anchors. I know a lot of people who ride STP1s and love them.

_MK
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
MK_ said:
Drop Off 4 has aluminum damper on one side and plastic on the other.
DJ pro has SSV damping
DJ Comp has elastomers

DJ pro is the smallest evil, so to speak. Drop Off would be the lightest, both DJs are boat anchors. I know a lot of people who ride STP1s and love them.

_MK
thank you very much. I will be getting the STP1, although i am going to upgrade the front derailluer(sp?) to a Deore (or better, depends on price). Could you please tell me what "SSV" damping is? If i was to upgrade my fork in the future, what would you recommend? I am not sure how much to spend either... what travel size would the STP1 limit me to (in mm's)?

thanks agian

Laurence
 

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carpe mañana
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SSV is a very simple damper where oil is directed through fixed size orifices. It works great in DJ/Urban application. It doesn't work great on trails because when the frequency of impacts increases, the oil can't move fast enough and the fork begins to pack up, it is not able to respond to trail features fast enough.

One other thing, you should keep in mind, is that nothing compares to steel in the Urban/DJ enviroment. STP1 has great geometry, etc, but it is an aluminum frame, which is very harsh during landings. Steel would definatelly take the edge off dropping off of loading docks, etc.

_MK
 

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Just getting back into the mountain bike scene, and I want to know your thoughts on current suspension technology (5"+). I'm from the motocross scene, so it's mainly coil over oil with air bleed offs on the forks or a gas pre-charge on the rear shock.

How are the new air forks? I'm a bit hesitant. I was in a local bike shop, the sales guy, after telling me air suspensions rock, pushed down on the fork of a Cannondale, and the seal popped off with a loud bang; it hit the guy in the head...quite classic moment.

What are decent forks? What are junk? How 'bout shocks?
 

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jtomasik said:
Just getting back into the mountain bike scene, and I want to know your thoughts on current suspension technology (5"+). I'm from the motocross scene, so it's mainly coil over oil with air bleed offs on the forks or a gas pre-charge on the rear shock.

How are the new air forks? I'm a bit hesitant. I was in a local bike shop, the sales guy, after telling me air suspensions rock, pushed down on the fork of a Cannondale, and the seal popped off with a loud bang; it hit the guy in the head...quite classic moment.

What are decent forks? What are junk? How 'bout shocks?
Do a search on "air" and you will find a lot of "air vs coil" debates. In that your question is different than the original question in this thread, you may also want to start a nother new thread if you can't find your answer rather than highjacking this thread. Highjacking just confuses things and as the term implies, steals the thread from it's intended purpose of answering the original poster's question.

To give you a short answer, air shocks have come a long ways in terms of their capabilities and reliability over the past 5+ years. Many manufacturers are going with air on one side, coil on the other to capitalize on the best characteristics of both damping methods. As for what manufacturers you should be looking at, I'd say Marzocchi, Fox and some of the '05 and newer offerings from Rock Shox.

Funny story with the seal popping on the Cannondale. I don't think it's indicative of the general state of well engineered air forks and shocks, though.

Good luck in finding something that suits your needs.

Bob
 

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carpe mañana
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As a first rule of thumb, you should stay away from proprietary stuff like C-dale. You essentially are bound to the offerings of that company, you can't really interchange. Air forks are starting to get really good. They are harder to setup than coils, at times, like Marzocchis, as you have 4 air chambers to worry about. Lots of room for adjustments and tuning, but if you don't like to tinker, it might be a headache. PIKE dual air, with or without Uturn, is heralded as the best air for out there. It is exceptionally well riding. Maverick makes two very nice air forks as well. Coil is about a half pound heavier, on average, than full air, and it gives you security of not worrying about blown seals and a stuck down fork out on trail. Rear air shocks are getting pretty awesome as well. The DHXair is my favorite of the Fox line.

_MK
 
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