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Hi all,

I have been looking at getting a new bike for months now and can't decide.

I am 39 years old, 6 feet and 175 lbs. I will start by riding around the community with my family on gravel roads and then occasionally take it to my local trails. I am in the east coast usa.

I started out thinking of getting the DB sync'r as it gets highly recommended and it seems its a good bang for your buck specially with discount. However, I also found out that through expert city I could get the release 1 for $1500. Not sure if I should spend double the money of s sync'r on a FS bike.

I am open to used bikes and looking at FB markeplace but cant find anything cheap, and honestly I want to buy new unless I am getting a $4000 bike for like $1000, which won't happen and I wouldn't even to check if the bike is in ok condition.

So for a Hardtail is the sync'r the best option out there? are there better bikes for less money?

and same for a FS the release 1 the best option for $1500?

I want something fun, light, nimble. i have tried 27.5 and 29 and I like 27.5 more.
 

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jcd's best friend
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The DB Release is very popular in my area (Washington state). It just depends on whether you can take advantage of a FS bike. You honestly can't go wrong with a Sync'r for any type of trail. Plus that bike will allow you to progress without the need to buy another bike...unless you are me. If you are like me, then you own 5 bikes at one time. :D
 

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since 4/10/2009
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You can ride a LOT on a respectable trail hardtail. The major differences are that FS allows for more potential speed (because the suspension keeps the tires on the ground and gives more traction) in some situations and it also helps with comfort on long days, since your body doesn't absorb as much from the hits the bike takes on the trail.

I moved to the Pisgah area and I'm pretty amused that I see more mid to high end hardtails built to handle fun, rough downhills than I ever saw in Indiana, where I moved from, which has mellower terrain. Most folks I knew and rode with there went from entry level hardtail straight to full suspension unless they were xc racing or on a singlespeed. But lots of full suspension bikes.

I say go ride some bikes. Since DB sells so many online, it can be hard to test ride one. But test rides will tell you more than online spec sheets can.
 

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Single(Pivot)and Happy
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This is the third thread asking for the same advice. Get a comfort bike, which is perfect for what YOU describe how you will be using your bike. Or, like I suggested in one of your other threads, if available in your city, just rent a dockless bike for $1 an hour.

PS: As stated in one of your other threads, don't take the name of this bike literally.
 

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I rode bike park trails two weeks ago on my hardtail and loved it. Many people told me they couldn't believe I was riding the trails I was riding on a hardtail (blues and blacks). If you don't have something like $2k+ to spend, get yourself a good hardtail (for half that) and enjoy the riding.

You will know when it's time to drop $3-7k on a full squish bike. Until that time, which will be a year from now or maybe never, you should have no problem at all getting a lot of fun out of a hardtail. All those big jumps, riding walls, drops, and other types of trail features you see on YouTube, I do on my hardtail.

Every time I go to a demo event and ride the fancy bikes, I get back on mine and run the same trails on my bike and the difference is so minor that I psych myself out of dropping $4k on a full squish. Are they better? Yes. But are they $4k better? Probably not--for me and my riding at this point.

As long as the bike you end up with has an air fork, hydraulic disc brakes, and *maybe* a dropper seat post if you're going to get really rowdy, you will be surprised at what it's capable of before you feel the bike is holding you back. If I can ride and enjoy bike park on a hardtail, certainly you can learn to mountain bike on a $1k hardtail. And saving a few bucks gives you money for a bike rack, some shorts, a pack to carry water, maybe a skills class or three, well, you get the idea...
 

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Hi all,

I have been looking at getting a new bike for months now and can't decide.

I am 39 years old, 6 feet and 175 lbs. I will start by riding around the community with my family on gravel roads and then occasionally take it to my local trails. I am in the east coast usa.

I want something fun, light, nimble. i have tried 27.5 and 29 and I like 27.5 more.
My thoughts are:
- buy a new bike, from a shop that you like and gives you a good "vibe"
- buy a hardtail: they're lighter than FS, especially lower cost ones
- I'd put you on a 29er, but if you like 27.5 I can't argue with you!
 

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The Sync'r looks like a trail worthy ht. Only needs a dropper post to be complete.

I'm a huge fan of trail ht's, but especially for beginners I think they make even more sense. XC ht's are kinda twitchy and don't inspire confidence on a new rider. FS bikes offer more control and help you fatigue less but are usually more costly to acquire and maintain.

I don't know if there's a better bike for you, but the Sync'r doesn't look like bad at all.
 

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A FS is not needed for what you expect to be riding. Go with the hardtail and get out and ride. Time's a wasting...pull the trigger!
 

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For riding around the neighborhood with kids, and functional bike that kind of fits you will do. If you want to start riding trails, a mountain bike like the Syncr will get you out there, but a Jump rental bike will not. FS will get you less bike for the same price, and a modern, decent hardtail is certainly not going to hold you back.

If buying a Diamondback means they ship it directly to your door, assemble it and pay your local bike shop to for the cheapest, basic tune up, or give some beer to a seasoned amateur who's good with a wrench.

Get a helmet, gloves, eye protection, and some way to carry water. Connect online with your local mtb community and go to a beginner-friendly "no drop" ride.
 

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I only got my bike within the last month, so I really know nothing about quality bikes, but based on what you said you're planning on doing, I think you could get by on a Walmart bike.

Riding around a community and gravel roads is nothing, and if that's going to be your primary areas you ride, I'm thinking your idea of a trail is a groomed fire trail...

You might want to save yourself some funds and just get a sub $500 bike at your local bike shop.

Take a look at this.. a Walmart FS Huffy..
 

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I'd rather have a solid hard tail or fully rigid proven trail bike than a cheaper full suspension. And the riding you describe could be done on a non mountain gravel bike. Full suspension is unnecessary. And cheap full suspension kind of sucks.

Remember this: the most important component is your frame. Suspension and forks can be changed. But a low quality frame will always decrease ride quality and value.

I love my rigid Surly Karate Monkey (check out the Surly forum, so does everyone else). It's a real trail bike, but also works on gravel, asphalt, bike packing, pulling a load. Whatever. It can also be purchased with a nice suspension fork and dropper post. Choice of either 29 inch tires in a more traditional width, or 27.5 inch in wide, 3 inch tires (mid fat or 'plus).

Rigid is $1500.00. Suspension is around $2k, if memory serves. It come stock with one of the higher-end Rock Shoks.

Another option, and a bike I'd rather enjoy owning, is a Salsa Timberjack hardtail. Choice between 29 and 27.5+. Several component levels available. The Deore and SLX are on sale.

Deore is on sale for 1090, or thereabouts. SLX on sale for $1399.

https://surlybikes.com/bikes/karate_monkey

https://salsacycles.com/bikes/timberjack/2019_timberjack_deore_29
 

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I only got my bike within the last month, so I really know nothing about quality bikes, but based on what you said you're planning on doing, I think you could get by on a Walmart bike.

Riding around a community and gravel roads is nothing, and if that's going to be your primary areas you ride, I'm thinking your idea of a trail is a groomed fire trail...
That's terrible advice.
As a 6' someone who spent 10+ years on a "nice" Walmart bike, I highly recommend against that. Setting aside suspension that's waaaaay worse than even the "crap" that comes on a bottom rung bike shop bike, a bike bought at a Walmart store will never fit him, they are made to fit the "average" person, so will be too small for someone 6' tall. I always felt cramped on my Walmart bike, like I was moments from going OTB for no reason, so I rode less, because riding wasn't fun.

Honestly a bottom rung bike shop bike is designed for exactly the type of riding the OP describes. Then if he finds the stock fork is holding him back on the trails, a $200 suntour upgrade will fix that.

To the OP, my hardtail specialized pitch sport ($625) is more comfortable and rides better than my FS Walmart bike ever did.

After my first couple rides on it I was wishing I had bought a FS bike, but a month later and a few more rides (+ being in slightly better shape), and I am glad I went with a "cheap" bike shop hardtail.
I know a whole lot more now than I did then. I can take my time to figure out exactly what I want in a FS bike rather than just jumping on something because it's cheap and full suspension.
 

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Salsa Journeyman. Excellent do-anything bike. Exactly what you need per your first post. And it's on sale and will grow with your skill level while remaining very practical. The 650 version is equivalent to the 27.5. Read the 'Journeyman Geometry' portion for a description of the bike's usability.

Also, read the reviews. They are using the bike exactly as you describe.

https://salsacycles.com/bikes/journeyman_650b/journeyman_flat_bar_claris_650.
 
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