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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all,

Just got a new bike after fattening up for a few years, but would like to know if it's wise to lube all moving parts - ie derailleur joints, shifters, clipless pedals. I already degreased the "glue" off the new chain and used Tri-Flow lube on it. I'm worried I'll be mixing it with any existing lube that came from the factory.

Should I also grease the handlebar where it connects to the stem as well, along with the shifters and brake clamps?

Thanks
 

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Nope....

relax, the factory lubes on most parts are just fine! Start degreasing everything and you'll set your self up for a whole lot of headaches. The chain is a good idea. The stuff they put on modern chains isn't a lube, but a preservative to prevent rust during long periods of storage. It's sticky and doesn't do much except collect crud. However the rest of the components should be fine. Certainly wipe off excess, but don't start degreasing stuff. You can certainly lightly lube derailleur pivot points and the like, but unless the bike has seen allot of miles it won't be necessary yet. And don't worry about mixing a little triflow with what ever is there to begin with. It won't hurt a thing. The bottom line is, if it is functioning correctly leave it alone. Cleaning and lubing should be done at least once a season, usually at the beginning, along with your annual tune up. More often of course if you ride in wet or winter type conditions regularly. Or if a component seems to not be functoning correctly and adjustment doesn't cure the problem.

So to summerize, go over the bike and wipe off any excess lube that you may find. Leave the factory lubes and assembly lubes in place on the derailleurs etc. they won't hurt anything and are there for a reason. And don't start hosing degreaser around, you'll get it into places that you don't want it to go. Just get the stuff off of external surfaces if you want. A rag with a little simple green on it will work great for this. Put some miles on the bike and wait to start hiting pivot points and such until your first or next tune up.

Good Dirt
 

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You didn't need to degrease the chain, depending on who made the bike they usually use really nice grease or lube. I lubricate my chain, my fork stanchions, and sometimes I put a bit in my brake levers where the lever meets the body. Never get any kind of grease or lubricant any where near your actual brakes, you could contaminate them. Dont forget after you apply lube to the chain wipe it back off with a rag. Lots of extra Lubricant will attract more dirt than a dry chain,
 

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Lubricate when things get noisy or sticky. The less you throw lube on, the less crap it will collect. When you lube something, wipe it back off nice and clean and when you lube, make sure to lube in the moving parts. When you lube your chain, lube the rollers and wipe it off. The outer links have virtually nothing to do with performance as long as they're not getting rusty (which they won't if you wipe the lube clean).

Shimano will say not to degrease their chains when you install them because the lube penetrates into the inner rollers and joins where it will sit and help your chain.
 

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biomanz said:
Hi all,

Just got a new bike after fattening up for a few years, but would like to know if it's wise to lube all moving parts - ie derailleur joints, shifters, clipless pedals. I already degreased the "glue" off the new chain and used Tri-Flow lube on it.
Good to know. I'll just wipe off the thin layer of oil/lube on the parts for now and wear em out a little first.
per sheldon brown, the waxy stuff that came on the chain (and other parts) to begin with was a way better lubricant than anything you buy at the store. but its too late to fix that.

http://www.sheldonbrown.com/chains.html

you don't need to lube everything now....if its new, it came ready to go. go ride it and have fun, and start cleaning/lubing when it gets dirty/noisy.
 

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Hmm removing the stuff they pack on the chain from the factory... One of the great debates on this board, right up there with clips or flats.

I can't stand the stuff. I don't care if it is better for the chain or if I shorten the lifespan by removing it. It is so sticky, it picks up every speck of dirt and grime from my trails. Every new chain that I put on my mountain bike gets a bath in kerosene and relubed with Tri Flow before I ride it.

Then, the only problem is a safe disposal of the contaminated kerosene.
 

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emtnate said:
Hmm removing the stuff they pack on the chain from the factory... One of the great debates on this board, right up there with clips or flats.

I can't stand the stuff. I don't care if it is better for the chain or if I shorten the lifespan by removing it. It is so sticky, it picks up every speck of dirt and grime from my trails. Every new chain that I put on my mountain bike gets a bath in kerosene and relubed with Tri Flow before I ride it.

Then, the only problem is a safe disposal of the contaminated kerosene.
I generally just wipe the new chain, then apply my normal chain lubricant once it's on the bike.
 

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I had a KMC chain which I tried everything on to get the sticky gunk off. Nothing worked except a soak in mineral spirits and then scrubbing with kerosene. I was about ready to try the motocrosser's trick of carefully boiling your chain in your lube of choice.

It seems like the SRAM chains aren't as bad. I kept the factory grease on my commuter and haven't had any problems. I can't help but think how much stuff is picked up has to do with our soil.
 

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emtnate said:
I had a KMC chain which I tried everything on to get the sticky gunk off. Nothing worked except a soak in mineral spirits and then scrubbing with kerosene. I was about ready to try the motocrosser's trick of carefully boiling your chain in your lube of choice.

It seems like the SRAM chains aren't as bad. I kept the factory grease on my commuter and haven't had any problems. I can't help but think how much stuff is picked up has to do with our soil.
I use SRAM chains. Probably lucky too, living in California. We get dusty and .. not dusty. Muddy days are maybe 5/365 or so :\
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
emtnate said:
Hmm removing the stuff they pack on the chain from the factory... One of the great debates on this board, right up there with clips or flats.

I can't stand the stuff. I don't care if it is better for the chain or if I shorten the lifespan by removing it. It is so sticky, it picks up every speck of dirt and grime from my trails. Every new chain that I put on my mountain bike gets a bath in kerosene and relubed with Tri Flow before I ride it.

Then, the only problem is a safe disposal of the contaminated kerosene.
Yea, I tried a few bikes in the past that kept the factory chain lube and there were specks of dust everywhere and would grind everytime I switch gears. They were so sticky that after I degreased and relubed it, the whole drivetrain spun much freely.
 

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You might want to check stem bolts, seat collar bolts, etc. to see if the factory put any grease on the threads. Most do, but check anyway. You have headaches down the line if the bolts don't have a thin layer of grease on them. Seatpost too.
 
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