Mountain Bike Reviews Forum banner
1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,156 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Have you ever purchased a second/replacement bike because the most recent new bike just wasn't doing it for you. Spend a month or so dialing it in, maybe change a wheel or shifter or fork. Actually take the time to fit and fine tune but to no avail, and one day you are just done. Time to call it quits because you and this bike are not "one." Sometimes that happens. It is new bike purchase time. Again.

You read reviews. Ask questions. Post a hundred threads. Then buy or order that new bike and make plans to sell the prior new bike.

But while waiting for that new bike to be shipped or show up at the dealer something clicks with the other bike. Maybe it was a sag change or handlebar sweep or tilting the saddle down. Something. Now that bike is 100% everything you wanted in the first place. Wow, this thing is amazing.

Uh oh. You paid a lot for the new one coming in. Let's say you are frugal or practical and having two bikes just does not make sense for your life. It's easy to read "keep two, one for backup, change is good" but you're just a one-bike kind of rider. No getting around it.

Has this ever happened to anyone? What did you do?
 

·
since 4/10/2009
Joined
·
35,278 Posts
Ummm...it takes me several years to buy a new bike. My last new bike was bought in 2003. I am building a new one now. 8.5yrs between bike purchases. And the new one isn't even a replacement for the old one. Totally different type of bike. So the 03 will keep on going for a few more years more than likely.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
273 Posts
Yes I have!!
Sold the best full-sus xc bike I ever owned to buy a Cannondale Prophet. The one I sold was a Jamis Dakar Team frame. I got sucked in by the "Bike of the Year" ads, and still regret it. I hated the feel of single pivot unless I was climbing. It's no wonder that unless I opt for another fully-active frame that I'm more happy with a hardtail and a shock-post...my old go-to bike...haha!

Live and learn while you help perpetuate the industry. Your money could be spent in less productive ways, so don't sweat it.:thumbsup:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
408 Posts
It's always good to have a backup bike if something breaks and you need to order the part. It sucks not being able to ride while your bike is waiting to be fixed. Plus you can always loan it to a friend who wants to try the sport. And you'll have interchangeable parts too.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,156 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Good points, but in this two-bike scenario they are vastly different parts wise but fill the same role.

The first bike is a 2011 Anthem X1 with a 650b front wheel. Had the issues, didn't become "one" with it, got frustrated, decided to get new one coming in.... and now it rocks.
The bike coming in is a 2012 Specialized Stumpjumper Expert Evo R 29er.

I'll probably end up selling one due to my impatience of pulling the trigger and buying the Speci. I don't need two lightweight steeper-angled bikes. My other bikes are a Scott CX Team and a Surly Karate Monkey SS. All fill a niche but the Evo R and Anthem X1 are two XC "race" bikes.

Today I did a timed test on my favorite loop on the Giant. I plotted my times at several places on the uphill portion and downhill. I'll do the same with the Evo R after giving it some time to get dialed in. The deciding factor will be which one is just plain more fun.

Impatience is going to cost me.

It's always good to have a backup bike if something breaks and you need to order the part. It sucks not being able to ride while your bike is waiting to be fixed. Plus you can always loan it to a friend who wants to try the sport. And you'll have interchangeable parts too.
 

·
Unpredictable
Joined
·
2,213 Posts
Have you ever purchased a second/replacement bike because the most recent new bike just wasn't doing it for you. Spend a month or so dialing it in, maybe change a wheel or shifter or fork. Actually take the time to fit and fine tune but to no avail, and one day you are just done. Time to call it quits because you and this bike are not "one." Sometimes that happens. It is new bike purchase time. Again.

You read reviews. Ask questions. Post a hundred threads. Then buy or order that new bike and make plans to sell the prior new bike.

But while waiting for that new bike to be shipped or show up at the dealer something clicks with the other bike. Maybe it was a sag change or handlebar sweep or tilting the saddle down. Something. Now that bike is 100% everything you wanted in the first place. Wow, this thing is amazing.

Uh oh. You paid a lot for the new one coming in. Let's say you are frugal or practical and having two bikes just does not make sense for your life. It's easy to read "keep two, one for backup, change is good" but you're just a one-bike kind of rider. No getting around it.

Has this ever happened to anyone? What did you do?
See, this is why you need a wife. She'll cut your knackers off with a really blunt knife so you really understand the depravity of your thoughtless excesses. Problem solved.. Best thing is with them gone both bikes will be more comfortable to ride:thumbsup:
 

·
High Desert MTBer
Joined
·
5,468 Posts
2 Bikes is essential if you want to continue riding while waiting for a part/repair or whatever, as was previously mentioned. How many times have you had to miss out on a ride while waiting for the one bike to get done...? I also use the second one for my partner if she wants to come out with me, just change over the saddle. It is nice to look at 2 clean and lubed bikes hanging in the garage and wondering which one to take out that day!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
307 Posts
You can only ride one bike at a time. There are some people who cannot ride any bikes at all because they can't afford them. Give the extra one away to a good home—to someone who will ride constantly and appreciatively. Your soul will be much better off and so will the soul of the person you gave it to. That's what I did with my last "surplus" bike (and it was a good one, too). I have absolutely no regrets. You have an opportunity to improve the world. Those opportunities don't come around very often. You should take advantage of it while the door is still open. Best wishes!
 

·
High Desert MTBer
Joined
·
5,468 Posts
You can only ride one bike at a time. There are some people who cannot ride any bikes at all because they can't afford them. Give the extra one away to a good home-to someone who will ride constantly and appreciatively. Your soul will be much better off and so will the soul of the person you gave it to. That's what I did with my last "surplus" bike (and it was a good one, too). I have absolutely no regrets. You have an opportunity to improve the world. Those opportunities don't come around very often. You should take advantage of it while the door is still open. Best wishes!
I like what you are saying, but there are definite arguments for more than one bike sometimes. Occasionally people get a little too acquisitive I think. I am not suggesting that you go and hand over your new Carbon framed 10k special tho... I did some research on giving old bikes a new home, as I am sure that many people have old frames and parts and so on that could easily get turned into good bikes for less fortunate people. Unfortunately these efforts are mostly based in major city areas, nothing much where I live, and costs of collection, transportation, repair etc make this a difficult proposition to implement effectively in many places. I have given some stuff away locally, based on research on my local websites, and encourage others to do the same. I am sure that a lot of you have old stuff lying around you will never use again!
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top