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Which bike should i go with?

  • Gary Fischer HiFi Deluxe 29er

    Votes: 3 30.0%
  • Specialized FSR Comp 29er

    Votes: 7 70.0%
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm looking to get a 29er in the next few days, and i was wondering what people's thoughts are in regards to the free lifetime adjustments.

I am debating between 2 bikes:

2009 Gary Fisher HiFi Deluxe, for 1700 from a guy who works really close to me. He works close enough that he could take it in for me in the near future, but i have a feeling i won't work very close to him for much longer, so that won't be a viable option beyond 6 months from now (i don't know this guy, personally, i found him on craigslist, and he happens to work right next to me). This bike is great condition, he says he only rode it once, and after seeing the bike, i believe him.

2009 Specialized Stumpjump FSR Comp, for $2160 (after taxes) from a shop, that will give me lifetime minor adjustments for the brakes and derailleurs/shifters.

So my question... Is it worth it to go the extra $$$ and get the specialized for the lifetime adjustments? Will i really need it adjusted beyond 6 months from now? Are adjusting Hayes Stroker Trail brakes, and SRAM X9 something that a beginner biker could reasonably expect to learn?

Any advice would be very helpful!
 

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I wouldn't be as concerned about adjustments as I would be about the warranty. The used Gary Fisher means no warranty to anyone other than the original owner. If I am spending that kind of cash I want some piece of mind to come with the bike. Just my two cents.
 

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This issue often has more to do with the bike than the warranty. I'd check the reviews here on mtbr.com for the bike in question, and just look at the Weaknesses sections where people describe what goes wrong. If your particular bike tends to require constant service and warranty issues for the suspension or the brakes in particular, it's best to have a shop handle it. Also I'd check YELP or some other local review site and make sure the shop in question is really highly reputed. It's amazing how poor the service can be at a bad shop, some shops can't even get a tune right... and anyone can tune a derailleur with perhaps 5 minutes of reading on the basics.

The big issue to me is that suspension and hydraulic brakes are messy and you don't want to fiddle with those things on your living room carpet (especially if you're like me and your living room IS your only garage). If you've got a bike with mechanical brakes and it's SS - do it all yourself, otherwise you should seriously have a backup plan with a professional.
 

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I'd rather learn to tune a bike or adjust the brakes as opposed to forking over $1500 if the frame breaks. Not saying it will and I'm not speaking ill of Gary Fisher, but the great thing about buying a bike new from the larger manufacturers is you are covered if the frame breaks due to a manufacturer defect.

But...it is pretty much a moot point. He can either get the GF w/o a warranty from a guy who could be shady, or buy a brand new Specialized with the warranty and from a shop who still has to answer to a large corporation (a good thing to have on your side if the shop screws something up on the bike). If it were me and these were the only two bikes in the world I could choose...then I'd go with the Specialized.

As was stated above, just make sure the shop is has a good reputation for service after the sale. It is an unfortunate fact that some shops out there are not worthy of your money. Do your research before pulling the trigger.
 

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I don't huck.
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Whatever you decide, you owe it to yourself to learn to do your own minor adjustments. There is no bike shop warranty in the backcountry. Surprising how many riders I see that have not the faintest idea how to diagnose or adjust/repair shifting issue or brakes rubbing, etc...mechanical or not.

At first it seems daunting, but if the bike shop will let you, hang around the repair bay and watch them tweak your bike. Ask questions. Get with an experienced bike person and have them show you some basics. Buy some tools over time and learn to use them. It will pay off someday when you are able to keep your own bike running smoothly and safely.

Not to say this was not your plan, but it can be too easy to rely on the LBS for maint stuff.
 

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As a Fisher owner I have to say that IMHO , do not buy a Fisher bike without the benefit of a warranty . Learning how to do your own tune ups is also sage advice . Good luck .
 

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I think you'd be better off learning how to do the minor adjustments yourself. I can understand if you're not mechanically inclined or just don't like doing that kind of thing, but really with a couple hours reading on the internet and a couple of hours trying the adjustments on your bike you should be able to handle most bike adjustments yourself. It's empowering and it will cost you less money over the long run, especially if you ever move or upgrade to a bike without the free adjustments.
 

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A1an said:
I wouldn't be as concerned about adjustments as I would be about the warranty. The used Gary Fisher means no warranty to anyone other than the original owner. If I am spending that kind of cash I want some piece of mind to come with the bike. Just my two cents.
+1.
 

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is buachail foighneach me
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As much as I dislike Specialized the company, between those two situations, the specialized is the safer bet for the long term. Their stuff works well, and having the warranty there makes a big difference if something does go wrong.

Lifetime minor adjustments could come in handy, but within a few years, you'll probably have figured out how to do the adjustments yourself. The big benefit though, will be if something ever does break under warranty. You'll be able to deal directly with the shop, and they'll work a little harder to get it done for you considering you purchased it there.

Worth the extra money in my opinion.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks for the replies everyone. I knew the lifetime adjustments wouldn't transfer to me, but the Gary Fisher warranty not transferring was news to me (and i checked the website and confirmed this to be true). That is definitely something to consider, and i would agree that it's more important than the adjustments.

Thanks again everyone, very helpful!
 
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