Mountain Bike Reviews Forum banner
1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I used to routinely use Lizard skin covers on my forks and shocks, especially in out clay-mud spring season here in Ohio. My LBS guy told me that with the new generation of seals, this is no longer necessary and in fact counter-productive. He says it justs traps dirt and moisture against the piston surface, encouraging wear. I am using a Vanilla 120 on the front and and RP3 on the rear on one bike, a Float RL and a PUSHed Talas on the other. Any thoughts?

Thnaks

Dave
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,982 Posts
drdave39 said:
I used to routinely use Lizard skin covers on my forks and shocks, especially in out clay-mud spring season here in Ohio. My LBS guy told me that with the new generation of seals, this is no longer necessary and in fact counter-productive. He says it justs traps dirt and moisture against the piston surface, encouraging wear. I am using a Vanilla 120 on the front and and RP3 on the rear on one bike, a Float RL and a PUSHed Talas on the other. Any thoughts?

Thnaks

Dave
You'll hear from both sides regarding this issue.

I always use the lizard skins on my air shocks and forks. I've used them since 2001. I still have all 3 forks...thousands of miles and not a scratch or wear mark on any of them. They work especially well on rear air shcoks when the larger body is on top. Crud can't get trapped under any condition..unless you ride updide down :rolleyes: My 2001 SID XC fork still holds air well, as does the 2001 Fox Float R rear shock. It's a noodle of a fork, but that's another issue.

I usually remove the covers after every couple of rides to make sure that not too much crud gets in there. Clean them very once in a while and you're good to go. They also protect the stanchions from getting scratched during crashes.

I highly recommend them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,771 Posts
A old fork boot

drdave39 said:
I used to routinely use Lizard skin covers on my forks and shocks, especially in out clay-mud spring season here in Ohio. My LBS guy told me that with the new generation of seals, this is no longer necessary and in fact counter-productive. He says it justs traps dirt and moisture against the piston surface, encouraging wear. I am using a Vanilla 120 on the front and and RP3 on the rear on one bike, a Float RL and a PUSHed Talas on the other. Any thoughts?

Thnaks

Dave
slipped over the lower on the rp3?
 

·
Shortcutting Hikabiker
Joined
·
3,220 Posts
I think they're kind of pointless and look dumb but it's up to you. Do whatever you want.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
417 Posts
How do you remove rubber boots on shocks that don't need them? The boots on my older set of Rock Shox only seem to attract dirt to the uppers, as opposed to sealing them off.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,120 Posts
Always rubber to practice safe biking

You should always cover your shock with lizard skins regardless whether the seal is designed better than the older models. The cover provide the best protection and also minimize your time in cleaning the shock. I am serious about it. You can't rely your trust on the manufacturer word on seal effectiveness.

You should cover up shock with rubber just like you practice safe sex ! :p Do trust some girl word that she std free? It is best to cover up.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
981 Posts
They are not completely useless. The shock position on my 01 FSR was right in line with the rear tire and dirt and crap got projected onto it all the time. My lizard skin kept it clean. I a true believer in that clean parts last and perform longer.

On my current bike, a KHS 304 frame, the shock is in the front triangle and the seat tube shields it from any rear wheel splatter, so I don't use the Lizard skin anymore.

I think the neoprene covers work very well in dry conditions and keep dust and dirt out. When things get muddy, the covers can trap yuck and stuff. So it all depends on your trail conditions.

The covers also do a good job at keeping the coil shocks clean too. the shaft area that sits inside the coil is hard to keep clean and the cover solves it.
 

·
I already rode that
Joined
·
1,632 Posts
I dont use any on the front but on the rear I do. I think you espec should if the shock is "open" to debris from the rear tire like on the tracer frame. Less likely to need one if the shock is inside the front triangle like on a blur.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top