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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi folks,

New here, nice forum, glad to see I'm not the only "big Boned" person turning to mt biking to loose weight.

I'm 5' 9" and 335lbs. I have not riden in many years but need to get in shape. I always loved biking so I hope getting a bike and getting outdoors will help get me back to better health.

I've been bike shopping for a month and want to bite the bullet tommorrow. I am looking at the kona dogma. I want to get something that I will not have to upgrade too much right away. I was told by the LBS guy that I may want to add stiffer springs in the front fork and put a coilover in the rear. Those upgrades are ok with me cause I realize I will need to "fine tune" the bike for me.

Is this bike going to be ok for a guy my size? Is a full suspension bike ok for a 335 pounder? I know things will wear out and in time I will want to upgrade but with money being tight I don't want to spend much more than the $1500 the bike cost (at this time).

Or should I get that Hoss by kona? I think that frame maybe tougher but think I'd like the softer ride of the FS.

One more question for today. Every bike I have test driven, the seat really hurts me. Is this something I can fix with a better fitting one? I am hesitant in getting a bike if the seat issue will keep me from riding.

Thanks for any and all advice.
 

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mbtr member
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kona Dawg?

I would opt for a hardtail at 335lbs, and definately change the springs to suit your weight. You need a spring that can hold you up, and if you manage to find something stiff enough, the shock will be pretty stressed; most bikes will never feel 'quite right' when you're over 250lbs. A small adjustment to the tip of the saddle can greatly change how it fits, and don't assume that because you've got a big butt you need a wide seat; your pelvic bones aren't any wider than anyone elses, but it will take some rides before you build up the muscles that hold your butt up while you pedal.

Konas are good bikes. What kind of terrain do you see yourself on, once you have 'caught the bug?'
 

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local trails rider
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The Hoss or something similar, a hardtail, would probably be better, especially at your price range.

No seat is going to be comfortable during the first few rides that you do after a long break. Usually it gets better after a while.

I second what scottzg said: wider (or softer) is not necessarily better, and small adjustments to seat position and angle can make a big difference.
 

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BIG and Bald
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Both of these guys are right on with their advice. Full suspension bikes are cool and do take alot of the thud out of bumpy rides however, at our weight (I'm just over 350) it's just not practical.

I say get the Kona Hoss and upgrade to a better fork. Everything else on the bike is solid. I've had my '06 Hoss since late 2005 and it's as beefy a bike as anything I've ever riden without feeling like you're pedaling a tank. I've had absolutely no issues at all with ANY component on the bike. I did however upgrade the fork when I bought it which my LBS was able to get the vendor to take the stock fork as trade in value for the new one.

As for the saddle, it just takes time to toughen up that area to get used to riding. As mentioned above, positioning is a big factor as well...a little tilt forward or back, slide it a bit to the front or rear and you should notice dramatic results. Your shop should help you dial this in if you ask them to. Seat height is crucial as well. Also, check into getting some padded bike shorts, you're tushie will thank you for it. :ciappa: You can find bigger sizes at aerotechdesigns.com.

Feel free to drop a line if you have any questions. Welcome to the world of cycling.:thumbsup: Don't forget a helmet!!!!
 

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I'm going to say the opposite of all the other folks here.

I am about your weight and have both a hardtail (Kona Stuff) and FS bike (Banshee Chaparral). My hardtail is rarely ridden because I love my FS so much, as a big guy your back and legs take quite a pounding in rough terrain on a hardtail. I constantly have back aches after riding the Kona around in rocky stuff.

The amount of money you are willing to spend probably won't get you a current model year LBS full suspension bike that can handle your weight, what it can get you is a used bike on Ebay/craigslist/mtbr classifieds or a closeout '06 or '07 model.

I love my Banshee because it is way overbuilt (12+ lbs frame) and doesn't have crazy travel or geometry. I kinda wish it had a lower leverage ratio, but I do fine with an 800# coil spring. I think another similar bike would be the best option, some sort of a burly freeride/trail bike with no more than 6" of travel.

The Transition Preston FR and Bottlerocket come to mind. A Kona Coiler wouldn't be a bad option, they have the Coiler Deluxe at wheelworld closeout right now for 2000.

http://wheelworld.com/itemdetails.cfm?id=4948

You could also go with an '06 Marin Quake CL7 for 2000.
http://www.pinkbike.com/buysell/288324/

I would personally go used that way if you don't like the bike or want something different the resale value would not depreciate much.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks everone and please keep the advice coming.

My LBS echos what big mountain biker just said. I was hoping the shop owner is not just trying to sell something more expencive. Now I do not really have a price range (well hopfully not over $2000) and would rather buy new. My LBS wants to order me a bike called the kona dawgma. It's not on kona's site or in their catalog but I googled it and kona does make a dawgma. It's a step below their dawg. The stuff the bike is made of looks to me like what the Hoss has, maybe cheaper brakes. I'm not up on the lastest gear, and I can't tell good from OK. I rely on the advice of the bike shop and hopully you bigger riders.

I am still up in the air Hoss or dawgma. Like the durability of the Hoss and the hope of a"softer" ride of the FS Dawgma. I need to get on something soon so I can drop some pounds and get some fresh air.

Thanks also for the seat advice.

Now another question. I will most likly, for the first month or two, stick to the road, even use it to get to work. Just to I get use to riding again. Should I get some differant tires so I don't wear out the off road ones? I will also be riding on dirt roads a lot on the weekends till I can get use to riding. It may take awhile to get back in the swing of things I've been out of shape for a long time.

Thanks again all. You guys are great.
 

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local trails rider
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At least it sounds like the guys at the LBS are being honest with you. You should be OK as long as you get a bike that is a bit on the strong side. The suspension and possibly wheels are really the critical points. I am not that big, by clyde standards, and had to go for heavy springs when I got my current FS bike. I have Marzocchi forks on a couple of bikes (one is still a "project") and the ability to adjust preload with air, even on coil forks, has been working great for me.

FS gives more comfort on rough trails but you obviously pay more for it. In money, but also added complexity, weight and maintenance.

Tyres...
Tyres with tall knobs are not great fun on pavement. The rolling resistance is huge compared with slicks or semi-slicks, they make noice, and they tend to wear out faster. You do not need the big knobs on good dirt roads either.

If you decide to ride to work, make sure you have a secure place for parking the bike. I have never had a bike stolen from me but I am pretty picky about where and how I leave it out of my sight.
 

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I personally would not go with the Dawgma, both the shock and fork would need to go. The Tora is definitely not Superclyde worthy, neither is the Ario 2.2 in the rear. You would probably need to spend about $800-1000 on suspension upgrades to get that thing to perform properly with you on it.

Between those two options the Hoss is better IMO. The DJ fork on the Hoss is not great, but it is through-axle and air+coil.

If you can swing it 2000 with no tax for the Quake CL7 is pretty sweet.



:thumbsup: :thumbsup:
 

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Do yourself a huge favor & buy a top notch FS bike to start… use a CC or what ever & just pay it off over time. You will have a bike that will last you for years and it will require fewer repairs. I started out at about 310 now at about 280 on my Santa Cruz Heckler… good quality suspension should handle your weight no problem. A second set of wheels with slicks will make life much easier for the road. Good luck!

Steve
 

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BIG and Bald
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Photoguy makes a great point too. If money is no object, go for it. However, commutiing on a full suspension is going to be pure hell...especially starting out. Unless your shocks have lock-out capability, you're going to loose way too much energy transfer when pedaling. These guys are talking about huge rock gardens, big drops and gnarly stuff. If you don't plan on riding anything like this, a full suspension is a waste of money.

You have to ask yourself these questions....

What are my short/long term goals for getting a bike?

Will I ever ride anything that will require a full suspension like rocky trails or big drops?

Good luck with your choice. May the best bike (for you) win. :D
 

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BIG and Bald
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OOPS, almost forgot...

As for commuting, If you're budget is pretty flexible, as it seems to be, buy a 2nd wheelset with commuting tires for those days on pavement. Since you'll only be riding on the road, you won't need a true "clyde wothy" set of wheels. I say you could get a suitable set with discs for less than $300.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I want to keep this bike purchase to around $2000, under will be better of course. I think my short term goals are to get back to some sort of shape. The long term would be to ride mountain trails with some jumps and air and to contiue to get in shape. I don't think I'll get into total downhill but I'd try it. My commutte is a mile so commutting is not a concern. I'll ride to work just to get the legs and butt use to the bike again (Plus I use more gas warming the car up than the trip). yes for the first few months I will be spendig a lot of time on dirt raods and flat trails, just till I get into biking shape.

I'm looking for an all around bike, wasn't this hard back when I was a kid, my huffy did it all.:) I know one bike can't do it all, but I don't and can't for awhile buy another one. So one will have to do for now.

Thanks for all your advice. I am going to bite the bullet tommorrow after work. I will be going into the bike shop with more knowledge thanks to you all. (but still undecided) I will go to the LBS tell him all my goals/needs/wants and we'll see what he comes up with. He is the expert, right?

Thanks again. please keep the helpful info coming.
 

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Deeohgee said:
my huffy did it all.:) I know one bike can't do it all,
Actually, one bike can do almost all. It is just not great at all things.

The thing is, bikes have become more specialized and our expectations have got higher, pushed by racing technology and marketing.

In my eyes, a FS bike is a very specialized tool, while a HT bike tends to me more like a carefree, do-it-all tool.
 

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With clydes, if you get a fs come a little extra maintenance. I would just get a HT for now and ride. By the time you have some weight off you will know exactly what kind of bike and riding you enjoy the most then you can take the money you saved from buying the HT with a little extra and buy the best FS bike for you.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Thanks

I just want to say thanks for all the sound advice.

After all was said and done, I am now the proud owner of a Kona Hoss.

I am a gear head and love the technical stuff about the full suspension bikes but don't think I really need it, because I'll be doing mostly dirt/backroads and fire trails for awhile.

I'm figuring if I stick this out and start to loss weight and get in shape, I may reward my efforts with a FS bike next year. This may give me incentive to keep motivated and by then I'll have more money so I wont have to chinz out on anything.

I have to ask another question... Where can I fine padded bike shorts in a XXXL? 46-48" waist.

My butt is sore after just a short ride lastnight. I'm still playing with seat adjustments. I put a "wbt comfort v" seat on the bike, cause I saw on another thread people were recomending it. My LBS also recomended it but said I can trade it in, if I find it's not working out.

I realize this seat issue way take time to get better, but I'm glad I finally got off my butt and got a bike.

Thank You again for all the advice.
Dan
 

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Found this from another Clyde post

aerotech.com

Has large sized padded shorts. I've been looking at them but haven't purchased any yet, they're a little pricey. If you do let me know what you think.
 

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Deeohgee said:
I just want to say thanks for all the sound advice.

After all was said and done, I am now the proud owner of a Kona Hoss.

I am a gear head and love the technical stuff about the full suspension bikes but don't think I really need it, because I'll be doing mostly dirt/backroads and fire trails for awhile.

I'm figuring if I stick this out and start to loss weight and get in shape, I may reward my efforts with a FS bike next year. This may give me incentive to keep motivated and by then I'll have more money so I wont have to chinz out on anything.

I have to ask another question... Where can I fine padded bike shorts in a XXXL? 46-48" waist.

My butt is sore after just a short ride lastnight. I'm still playing with seat adjustments. I put a "wbt comfort v" seat on the bike, cause I saw on another thread people were recomending it. My LBS also recomended it but said I can trade it in, if I find it's not working out.

I realize this seat issue way take time to get better, but I'm glad I finally got off my butt and got a bike.

Thank You again for all the advice.
Dan
Definitely a good call to go with the Hoss over the Dawgma :thumbsup: You'll love it.

As a super clyde, if you're anything like me (46" waist) you have no waist and regular bike shorts will drop as you ride hence mooning the folks behind you :eekster: Thankfully someone had the right idea and made bib bike shorts. I will not even ride around the block without my bibs.

I have a couple pairs from this website and they are awesome, cheap, good quality and they make them up the XXXXL (I use the XXXL) They give you a discount if you buy two pairs.

http://www.love2pedal.com/

I then either wear a pair of non-padded baggy shorts or track pants over them depending on the temperature.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
big_mountain_biker said:
As a super clyde, if you're anything like me (46" waist) you have no waist and regular bike shorts will drop as you ride hence mooning the folks behind you :eekster: Thankfully someone had the right idea and made bib bike shorts. I will not even ride around the block without my bibs.
Well, folks behind me should not be lookin' at my butt!:ciappa:

Thanks, I'll order some tonight.
 
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