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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have an XL Scott Big Ed, and I'm finding that I could use a little more weight on the front wheel. Believe it or not, the tires seem to grip slippery surfaces a little better with some more weight forward. In dry conditions it's not as much of an issue but more weight up front would still help with climbing.

I like really like the fit as it is now, so I'd rather not drop the stem. Would lowering the fork from 100 to 80mm travel be too drastic? I think that would steepen the HT angle from 69 to 70.


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Elitest thrill junkie
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Chromoly On-one fork, that'll do it.
 

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Good excuse to stand up all the time. Barring that, Ice cream truck fork with two anything cages bolted to it and a hydro-flask growler on each, filled with imperial IPA. And carry your gear in a sweetroll handlebar bag.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Longer stem. Seat forward. Wide bars.
Well I already cut the bars down a little because they came so stinking wide. And a longer stem is not really an option. I'm at the very low end of the size range for an xl. Reducing travel would actually lower the stand over a little too.....hmmm.

Chromoly On-one fork, that'll do it.
I like my Bluto when there isn't snow, which is often out here. Still wouldn't mind the rigid for certain times.

Good excuse to stand up all the time. Barring that, Ice cream truck fork with two anything cages bolted to it and a hydro-flask growler on each, filled with imperial IPA. And carry your gear in a sweetroll handlebar bag.
Standing up is how I discovered the front/rear balance problem. The front can handle more weight without causing float issues, and the steering traction gets way better. Only problem with the rest of those options is I can't really grow matching beard.
 

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Yes, shortening the fork will lower BB and increase standover clearance.
It will also shorten the front center, which is what you were after. So I would say do it. It will also steepen the headangle, so handling will change, you might like, if not you can always go back.
The easy way to try this out is by running a ton of sag.
Try and you'll know.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
What tires/pressure are you running?
Kenda Juggernaut 4.5. For snow riding I've been running them so soft they don't register, probably 3-4 pounds. When there is decent traction, it's not really much of an issue although more weight up front when I am in a neutral position would be nice. Now, I need to really exaggerate the forward attack position to get through the slippery slush and ice.

I've noticed the front rear problem in soft sand too. When I stand up the load actually gets shared better and float and grip improves.


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Fat bike sizing tends to be shorter length than a "normal" mountain bike, especially for snowy winter usage. The shop should've told you to size down if your borderline and riding in junky conditions...
 

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Elitest thrill junkie
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Fat bike sizing tends to be shorter length than a "normal" mountain bike, especially for snowy winter usage. The shop should've told you to size down if your borderline and riding in junky conditions...
What?
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Fat bike sizing tends to be shorter length than a "normal" mountain bike, especially for snowy winter usage. The shop should've told you to size down if your borderline and riding in junky conditions...
The XL fits like a glove. 3+ hour rides with no undo aches or pains, and works quite well on dirt. That's why I don't want to mess too much with ergos. Like I said, it's a pretty subtle issue that comes up when it's really soft or slick, or climbing steeps.

It sounds like the cheapest/easiest options are to maybe lower the stem 10-20 cm, tilt the seat a little more forward, possibly shift the seat forward 5-10 cm.

More involved option: shorten travel to steepen the head/seat angle, lower the top tube


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Weird. I seem to get much better climbing traction on soft snow with my weight back and on the seat. When climbing I like about 70 percent of the weight on the back tire. When descending, I use a dropper seat post. So I have the freedom to shift my weight forward or backwards depending on what I think is necessary. I wonder if a change of tires would solve the grip problem? I would never try to have less suspension. Or a steeper head angle.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Status update:

Tilted seat forward. Really just leveled it since it was tilted back a few degrees. Small improvement.

Dropped stem spacer 10mm. BIG improvement.

Dropped stem spacer another 10mm (all the way down). Small improvement.

With this setup, I could turn a lot tighter, kick the rear tire around in a controlled pedal slide, blaze trails, and climb better. I am pretty amazed at the difference. It is hard to say, but maybe 10-20 pounds may have been distributed forward? I weight 210 on the bike.

The true test will be a couple of long rides to make sure I did not change the ergos too much. I think I could raise the stem back 1 step and retain a lot of the good improvement, and still have a little comfort.

The whole thing is counterintuitive since I always thought it would be better to be biased towards the rear in soft and slippery conditions, but in this case I was overwhelming the rear tire and not getting enough from the front.


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Put a Clownshoe and a Bud split tubeless and a 203mm brake rotor on there. My bike weighs ten tons.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
I think this is your main problem. Get a better tire.
Not sure why everyone hates the KJ. Tubeless and low PSI it's a decent tire on soft/loose trails. That said it is slow as heck on hardpack/pavement, but that's not why I ride a fatbike....

With the improved fire/aft balance its been working pretty well.

I would like a Surly Bud/Lou combo once these wear out. But, the KJs are good enough to keep until that happens.


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