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robust, yet smooth
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473 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
here's the deal. my beloved First Real Bike is an old skool hardtail that was mid-level at best new and is now quite aged. BUT, I just moved and there's NO budget for a new bike and I need to ride NOW. So, minor fixes and upgrades and I'll save for a "Real Bike".

the subject: 99 Trek 930 hardtail (steel) - pretty std low-mid level build of the day with rockshox jett (elastomer) 63mm fork (sucks!), mix lx,xt,xtr (hand-me-down bargain from friend) drivetrain, inhouse and generic cockpit.

MUSTS - seatcollar - the QR handle broke and I've tried numerous bolts - all break. I think it has to do with the curvature stress that the seatcollar puts on the bolt. I'm also sick of it slipping, so I'm going with a new collar. Otherwise, it's a size too small and if the seat drops, I am way too endo prone.

NEEDS - brake pads (non-cartridge v-style), brake levers (up-down play and slow to engage), rear wheel needs truing (see: v-style braking), cables (6+ yrs old), front shifter (doesn't want to go into big ring half the time).

WANTS - fork - any half decent 80mm disc ready fork (used) should be an upgrade and let me throw a mechanical disc front wheel that I have.

PLAN ?? - gotta get the seatpost collar and might as well get some brake pads. I need a tune-up, but need to learn to do it myself. The rest is gravy and I'm open to suggestions on a decent model fork to look for used and the best deal on brake levers, brake pads, cables, front shifter (will have to source from same supplier to minimize shipping).

And of course, then I'm gonna ride it til it dies.

Best,

-capt pearl
 

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Crunchatize me Capn'
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2,898 Posts
Silicone spray. Hit most of the pivot points in the hard to move components like the front der. brake levers etc. It'll do wonders. Get a cheap seat post clamp from your LBS.
 

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local trails rider
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12,300 Posts
Brake pads and cables are cheap. Any bike shop will do. I like Koolstop pads for their easy installation and they brake well too.

Brake levers: whatever Shimano or Avid you can get a deal on.

Front deraileurs are pretty simple things I have a 14 year old one on my commuter/errand bike and it works perfectly. Cleaning/lubrication/adjustment could do wonders (and the new cables), unless it is bent or something. Check the gear levers too.

Marzocchi's MX Comp is a pretty good budget fork and there should be an 80 mm version too. No bells and whistles but they work.

Parktool has some pretty good instructions on their site. Shimano has some basic instructions online too.

If you need a maintenance book, look for "Zinn and the art of mountainbike maintenance". Amazon seems to have a couple of different editions.
 

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robust, yet smooth
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473 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
anyone use the generic nashbar/performance/sette brake levers?

-capt pearl
 

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Registered
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635 Posts
the park tool website should help you fix it up. i may have levers i can sell cheap, but need to check. seatpost clamps and break pads are at every LBS and r cheap. then get some cables and housing (if you have cable cutters). i don't think i'd bother upgrading the fork if it works.
 
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