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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi experts,

I'm a 180 lbs aggressive XC / AM rider and I'm going to build a new wheelset for my Blur LT2.

My choise of rims is:
- DT swiss 5.1d
- Mavic XM 819
- Stans ZTR Flow

Hubs:
- Hope pro II

Spokes:
- DT swiss, double butted (competition? revolution? super-comp? champion? :eekster:)

Q: What would be the best rim for me? also I need help choosing the spokes. DT swiss have so many types and lengths, I wouldn't know what to choose :rolleyes:

Thanks for your help!
-Laeddis
 

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Use the Stans flow; lite weight/high strength and seals up easy; Use the "yellow" tape for lite-weight, or the rubber "Olympic" strip for bomber/burp-free/no hassle set-up and does well sealing up a "dinged" rim.

Use DT's "SuperComp" {black only though} up front and the Competition in the rear, with brass nipples for durability. Use alloy nipples only if and when your racing, they will fail soon { 1-2 seasons} with every-day use. Hope this helps........ Gravy
 

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Use the Stans flow; lite weight/high strength and seals up easy; Use the "yellow" tape for lite-weight, or the rubber "Olympic" strip for bomber/burp-free/no hassle set-up and does well sealing up a "dinged" rim.

Use DT's "SuperComp" {black only though} up front and the Competition in the rear, with brass nipples for durability. Use alloy nipples only if and when your racing, they will fail soon { 1-2 seasons} with every-day use. Hope this helps........ Gravy
Gravy, I do not understand your aversion to alloy nipple. Is this specifically when used with rims without eyelets or in general?

Many of us here have been building and riding with alloy nips on rim with eyelets with zero issues. In 20 years I have broken 2 alloy nipples and both were on an eyelet-less rim.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Use the Stans flow; lite weight/high strength and seals up easy; Use the "yellow" tape for lite-weight, or the rubber "Olympic" strip for bomber/burp-free/no hassle set-up and does well sealing up a "dinged" rim.

Use DT's "SuperComp" {black only though} up front and the Competition in the rear, with brass nipples for durability. Use alloy nipples only if and when your racing, they will fail soon { 1-2 seasons} with every-day use. Hope this helps........ Gravy
Thanks Gravy,

Could you please be more specific regarding the spokes and their length?

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DT aero speed 215 - 305 mm 355 g (64 pcs / 264 mm) Black Bladed

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DT aero speed 215 - 305 mm 355 g (64 pcs / 264 mm) Silver Bladed

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DT aerolite 238 - 300 mm 278 g (64 pcs / 264 mm) Black Double butted and bladed

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DT aerolite 238 - 300 mm 278 g (64 pcs / 264 mm) Silver Double butted and bladed

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DT aerolite 238 - 300 mm 278 g (64 Stk / 264 mm) White Double butted and bladed

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DT new aero 215 - 305 mm 437 g (64 pcs / 264 mm) Silver Bladed

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DT alpine III 260 - 305 mm 418 g (64 pcs / 264 mm) Silver Tripple butted

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DT competition 238 - 300 mm 382 g (64 pcs / 264 mm) Black Double butted

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DT competition 238 - 300 mm 382 g (64 pcs / 264 mm) Silver Double butted

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DT competition 238 - 300 mm 382 g (64 pcs / 264 mm) White Double butted

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DT revolution 247 - 308 mm 286 g (64 pcs / 264 mm) Black Double butted

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DT revolution 247 - 308 mm 286 g (64 pcs / 264 mm) Silver Double butted

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DT super comp 247 - 308 mm 318 g (64 pcs / 264 mm) Black Tripple butted

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DT champion 247 - 308 mm 444 g Black -

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DT champion 140 - 315 mm 359 g - 591 g* (mentioned above) Silver -
 

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shiggy said:
Gravy, I do not understand your aversion to alloy nipple. Is this specifically when used with rims without eyelets or in general? Many of us here have been building and riding with alloy nips on rim with eyelets with zero issues. In 20 years I have broken 2 alloy nipples and both were on an eyelet-less rim.
I'm 200lbs (20 heavier than the OP) and I to have no issues with all the aluminum nipples I've ever used since, oh I dunno, the early to mid '90s maybe. And that's on mtb, road, track, fixed road and the last 5 months ~ cx. But then, all my rims have eyelets and maybe I'd reconsider the nipples if I used eyeletless rims.

Maybe Roger Musson will chime in as I know he's built many sets of wheels with Stan's rims and I can't remember if he uses alum nipples or not.
 

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Thanks for the reply;
Most rims with no eyelets have sharp edges @ spoke hole from drilling, which will dig into the alloy nipple when building and then riding. Use oil at the junction, while being carefull not to over tension is your best bet.
Alloy nipples do in fact "work", and work just fine in a very light manner resulting in a lighter wheel and spunkier ride. Great for racing and performance minded riders. I used them for all my cross-country racers over the years, but they only raced them, with new wheels at the ready. I made them train on 32 hole brass nipple wheels. Alloy will corrode over time and will degrade from fatigue much faster than brass. Here in the Bay area alloy nips only last a few seasons hard riding.

Brass { nickel plated } nipples are much harder than alloy and will not deform, fatigue or corrode nearly {lifetime} as fast. Use brass and you won't ever have to worry or have to "deal" with fixing broken alloy................... in the woods............. in the rain.............. at night................ get the picture?
 

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Thanks for the reply;
Most rims with no eyelets have sharp edges @ spoke hole from drilling, which will dig into the alloy nipple when building and then riding. Use oil at the junction, while being carefull not to over tension is your best bet.
Alloy nipples do in fact "work", and work just fine in a very light manner resulting in a lighter wheel and spunkier ride. Great for racing and performance minded riders. I used them for all my cross-country racers over the years, but they only raced them, with new wheels at the ready. I made them train on 32 hole brass nipple wheels. Alloy will corrode over time and will degrade from fatigue much faster than brass. Here in the Bay area alloy nips only last a few seasons hard riding.

Brass { nickel plated } nipples are much harder than alloy and will not deform, fatigue or corrode nearly {lifetime} as fast. Use brass and you won't ever have to worry or have to "deal" with fixing broken alloy................... in the woods............. in the rain.............. at night................ get the picture?
I understand your reasoning, rims and nipples.

I generally will not use alloy nipples in rims without eyelets for the same reason. I have done it but only after chamfering the inside of the spoke hole edges (which I usually do for brass nips, too).

As for the reliability, the coastal (salt) influence in the Bay Area must be much greater than it is here in WEsTern Oregon. My experience is alloy nipples last just as long as brass and a lot of my riding is in the woods...and the rain...in the dark. Check out my story using CX-Ray spokes in the review section.
 

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Mike T. said:
Maybe Roger Musson will chime in as I know he's built many sets of wheels with Stan's rims and I can't remember if he uses alum nipples or not.
On the lighter ZTR rims I use DT alu nipples and I've never had an alu nipple fail. To be more accurate, no customer has ever reported a failure and if a nipple failed I would expect them to report it since I guarantee the spokes and building for the life of the rim.

My own personal wheels used brass nipples but since most of my bike riding was done before I got involved with full time wheel building I had other considerations and weight was not one of them.

I just rode cyclo cross, not racing but just taking the road bike(with canti's) off road at every opportunity. When rims got trashed I just replaced the rim and the same brass nipples could be re used many times and it was essentially just more convenient.

Looking at Mike's CX bike brings back lots of good memories. It looks like a propper bike too, thin tubes made from predominantly iron and not Alu.

--
Roger
 

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roger-m said:
Looking at Mike's CX bike brings back lots of good memories. It looks like a propper bike too, thin tubes made from predominantly iron and not Alu.
Yep they're iron tubes Roger, but hi tech iron! It's that new-fangled Columbus Zona stuff with weird tube shapes. It was guaranteed to go faster and it scores points outside the coffee shop so I ordered it. :rolleyes:
 

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Laeddis,

I'm 235# plus gear and am running ProII's using DT Comp spokes (double butted) and Mavic 819 rims. The combo has been absolutely bulletproof for me.

If you'd like, I can dig out my notes and let you know what I used for spoke lengths (I went with the Mavic recommended, longer nipples)...if my memory serves, the spokes were in the 256-258mm range, but I would need to confirm those numbers. I used a couple on-line calculators (DT's and another) and they gave me about the same results, so I went with it.
 
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