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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So latest thing I keep hearing is about these dropper posts. I ride a trek fuel in the XL frame. I'm 6'3 220lbs. What are the benefits to dropper posts? Do I really need one or could it really be a big help? I know "need" isn't true, but who doesn't love new stuff.


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I am a hold out myself only because of my terrain. Ask your self this: do I feel the need or want to lower the seat height when riding certain sections of trails?

I am still a holdout because at this time it is few and far between I cannot get behind the seat to clear something. I pretty much have my seat in what would be discribed in dropper post terms as trail height
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Yeah makes sense. But I do find myself leaning far forward and sorta spreading my legs out wide to accommodate that leaning motion when I am on tough climbs.

Stupid questions, is the goal to drop the seat on climbs or descents?


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They are much more useful than I thought they would be, and I was also skeptical. I won't be getting rid of mine. I have a DOSS, which is three position. I normally ride in the middle position which is almost fully extended. On long, extremely steep climbs, I can pop it up 40 mm and get better leg extension/more power, while having some weight on the seat to keep my heart rate from spiking excessively. On the downhills, which I did well without it, I now ride them better, using techniques for better cornering at higher speeds than I did without the dropper.
 

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Yeah makes sense. But I do find myself leaning far forward and sorta spreading my legs out wide to accommodate that leaning motion when I am on tough climbs.

Stupid questions, is the goal to drop the seat on climbs or descents?


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Drop post on decents, raise all the way up on climbs to get full leg power while seated
 

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No. Just learn to get your butt back behind the seat when you need to, if you haven't already. No need to jump on that bandwagon.
 

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I picked up a Rockshox Reverb last summer and I have to say that I will never ride my bike without one. The convenience of dropping/raising the post on the fly is awesome.

As people said, it really depends on the terrain and style of riding you do. I live in an area with some steep technical climbs and descents. Being able to adjust on the fly is great. I find myself using the dropper every ride.
 

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No. Just learn to get your butt back behind the seat when you need to, if you haven't already. No need to jump on that bandwagon.
One thing I love about the dropper post, is I can put my weight where it should be. Sometimes this is behind the seat, but sometimes it is where the seat is. On the talks I ride there are a number of seconds where being just a little back, but low, really helps push the bike and keeps momentum. It also makes leaning the bike into corners while keeping my body vertical and correctly weight on the front wheel much easier when the seat is out of the way. Something that has been invaluable on many a non banked, kitty litter over hardpack, corner.
 

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I have a dropper on my Tallboy....held out for a very long time. Never felt the need to drop the saddle except for really sketchy DH's. I don't have a dropper on my SS....and can't say that I miss it, and I ride all the same trails.

I don't use the dropper as often as alot of people...often times I forget that it is there anyway.

My Kronolog is 3x heavier as the Thomson Masterpiece that it replaced....and that sucks.
 

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If you ride steep terrain, I think a dropper post is the best equipment upgrade you can make to improve your riding, bar none, without a close second. Without dropping the seat, you cannot get into the correct descending position....yes, you can hang off the back behind the seat, but most of the time that is not where you should to be to ride descents quickly. Getting the seat out of the way lets you do that. You can ride downhills faster, and can instantly get your saddle back up to full height on uphills...or in the middle when you need it there. It makes riding more fun...and you can definitly blast the downs more quickly and with more confidence.
 

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No. Just learn to get your butt back behind the seat when you need to, if you haven't already. No need to jump on that bandwagon.
I see lots of people say that...and I disagree with all of them :). Its better to get low and centred than off the back a lot of the time.

I was a skeptic too, I never put my seat down, I didn't like that I couldn't feel the bike by using the saddle on my thigh in corners, but I thought I'd try it...and wouldn't go back now.

Although I guess it depends on the terrain you ride. The woods I ride are quite up and down with technical steepish bits.
 

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I recently rented a bike in that had a dropper and it was awesome. A friend and I did a full day tour if Bootleg Canyon, NV and the dropper posts were great to have. I found it was most advantageous when cornering, not necessarily just when descending. You could get low and lean the bike farther because the seat was not contacting your thigh.
I have not purchased one for my bike because the descents here near Philly are copious, but not sustained. There are times when I'm wishing I had one, but my bike's 30lbs already, and a reliable dropper is close to $300.


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I recently rented a bike in that had a dropper and it was awesome. A friend and I did a full day tour if Bootleg Canyon, NV and the dropper posts were great to have. I found it was most advantageous when cornering, not necessarily just when descending. You could get low and lean the bike farther because the seat was not contacting your thigh.
I have not purchased one for my bike because the descents here near Philly are copious, but not sustained. There are times when I'm wishing I had one, but my bike's 30lbs already, and a reliable dropper is **over** $300.


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Fixed it lol


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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Lol yeah. I'm going to play with my seat height on a few loops and see what happens wen it's super low versus too leg stroke high.


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I adjust my seat post on the fly manually...no dropper post needed. I question why more people don't do this, it's easy enough to do and it saves the weight of the dropper post and the $$ to buy one.

I can understand if you are into racing it would save some time, but otherwise save the lbs (or maybe grams) and $$.
 
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