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I have an AD12 on my Rocket 88. I needed a new shock after my Fox died. It holds air fine but after rapid consecutive bumps, the shock packs down and remains compressed. Then over about 15 seconds, it 'rebounds' back to full extension. I had this happen with an AD5 on my MARIN a while back and I assumed it was just a sample flaw - it sits in my parts box now.

But is this a trait of Cane Creek shocks or is there some thing I can do to fix this? I've unthreaded the rebound and compression so there is no dampening. Still the shock packs down.

Any help appreciated.

REEK
 

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noMAD man
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12,220 Posts
Sounds like rebound circuit plugged.

Reek said:
I have an AD12 on my Rocket 88. I needed a new shock after my Fox died. It holds air fine but after rapid consecutive bumps, the shock packs down and remains compressed. Then over about 15 seconds, it 'rebounds' back to full extension. I had this happen with an AD5 on my MARIN a while back and I assumed it was just a sample flaw - it sits in my parts box now.

But is this a trait of Cane Creek shocks or is there some thing I can do to fix this? I've unthreaded the rebound and compression so there is no dampening. Still the shock packs down.

Any help appreciated.

REEK
Since this is an all air shock, it has no oil for damping. Air circuits in the shock body control the flow of air on compression and rebound, with needles to fine tune the flow to the rider's preference. Lubrication of the internal moving parts is handled by grease as is the sealing qualities of the o-rings and other rubber parts in the shock. If some grit, a dirty blob of grease, or a tiny bit of o-ring material is in one of the passages of the rebound circuit, you could get the symptoms you describe. The shock should be dismantled, cleaned, and a new o-ring rebuild kit installed. The beauty of the Cane Creek shocks is that this can be done by the owner or a decent bike shop mechanic without having to send it to a factory technician. When cleaning the disassembled shock, you should use compressed air to blow out the passages to dislodge the possible piece of grease, dirt, or rubber. This is the best advice I can think of with your described symptoms.
 

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TNC said:
Since this is an all air shock, it has no oil for damping. Air circuits in the shock body control the flow of air on compression and rebound, with needles to fine tune the flow to the rider's preference. Lubrication of the internal moving parts is handled by grease as is the sealing qualities of the o-rings and other rubber parts in the shock. If some grit, a dirty blob of grease, or a tiny bit of o-ring material is in one of the passages of the rebound circuit, you could get the symptoms you describe. The shock should be dismantled, cleaned, and a new o-ring rebuild kit installed. The beauty of the Cane Creek shocks is that this can be done by the owner or a decent bike shop mechanic without having to send it to a factory technician. When cleaning the disassembled shock, you should use compressed air to blow out the passages to dislodge the possible piece of grease, dirt, or rubber. This is the best advice I can think of with your described symptoms.
Inexpensive O-ring replacements:
http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&category=58086&item=7111137775&rd=1
 
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