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Have you heard of National Ski Patrol (NSP) before?

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BMX and a Ti Hardtail MTB
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Discussion Starter #1
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Has anyone heard of bike patrol and NSP? National Ski Patrol (NSP) is a nonprofit that sets medical training standards for ski and bike patrols across the country with over 31,000 members. Their flagship certification is Outdoor Emergency Care (OEC), which is similar to EMT, but more flexible and affordable for the 80% of membership that are volunteers. NSP is giving away a FitBit, Bolle Helmet, Patagonia mid-layer, and Hestra bike gloves to one randomly selected survey respondent.

You can take the survey here: NSP Bike Patrol Survey

You can earn more about the NSP bike patrol program at NSP Bike Patrol

Thoughts?
 

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I took the survey. I also contacted them regarding a gap in training for medical professionals. They require modified OEC training for EMTs and paramedics, none for physicians. I'm an ED RN, Level 1 Trauma Center, so I would argue that I may be more qualified in situations encountered by NSP volunteers than a person simply with MD/DO at the end of their name. That's not to say I am, but if their area of expertise isn't ED/ICU or some other similar critical care discipline, I might be. :unsure:

Add in PAs and NPs to that list as well.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I took the survey. I also contacted them regarding a gap in training for medical professionals. They require modified OEC training for EMTs and paramedics, none for physicians. I'm an ED RN, Level 1 Trauma Center, so I would argue that I may be more qualified in situations encountered by NSP volunteers than a person simply with MD/DO at the end of their name. That's not to say I am, but if their area of expertise isn't ED/ICU or some other similar critical care discipline, I might be. :unsure:

Add in PAs and NPs to that list as well.
I’m an EMT and tested out of OEC. OEC is great because It’s easier to renew and transfers across state lines (unlike EMT/Paramedic), but the organization has been resistant to making it easier for more people to test out. I’m not sure what the answer is for RN’s and above, but fully agree with you.
 

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I’m an EMT and tested out of OEC. OEC is great because It’s easier to renew and transfers across state lines (unlike EMT/Paramedic), but the organization has been resistant to making it easier for more people to test out. I’m not sure what the answer is for RN’s and above, but fully agree with you.
Got a response back already. Apparently there was a page that I overlooked which does state the option to 'test out.' 🙈

NSP said:
a) Challenge applicants must meet one or more of the following criteria:

i. Emergency trained and currently certified as: EMT, M.D./D.O., PA/NP, RN, or LPN.

ii. Previous OEC certification, provided the OEC certification has not been expired for more than one year.

iii. Certain wilderness first responders whose courses have a minimum of 72 hours of course work (currently approved are WMI, WMA, and SOLO).
 

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CEO Product Failure
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Yes. I was an active IMBA NMBP until SKI PATROL took over. Costs went up WAY UP when SKI PATROL took over the program. When IMBA ran the National MTB Patrol, I only had to pay for an IMBA membership, I covered my own CPR/First Responder training & training re-certifications, and volunteered at multiple events throughout the year: mtb races, xterra, and (foot races) 5k's.

Then Ski Patrol...costs for me to be a volunteer were $300+ per year. This coincided with IMBA's change in direction on a number of political issues impacting trail access. Suffice to say, both me and the 17 other patrollers I know, dropped both our IMBA memberships and did not pursue Ski Patrol. The MTB clubs I patrolled with echoed my own sentiments. All in all, the experience of NMBP to Ski Patrol has blemished and turned me off of volunteering.
 

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You can earn more about the NSP bike patrol program at NSP Bike Patrol

Thoughts?
Bruce-just noticed, you are the brand manager for ski patrol. Where are the program costs exposed on the site?

Comments I've received from several dozens of riders since patrolling was discontinued, "events just aren't the same without patrollers" and "we don't push as hard because we don't feel as safe". I'm in the midwest. The majority of our incidents were heat stroke and concussions. The clubs I volunteered for had radios, radio relay towers set up for courses with deep valleys, quarterly CPR training and first responder training, we were welcomed by all land managers and park districts. Its a shame the program no longer exists.
 

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When I was a volunteer ski patrol, thirty plus years ago, the deal was you show up at the resort and offer to patrol, if they need a patroller you get a free lift ticket and they assign you some tasks.

This mountain bike patrol gig costs money and it’s a pain in the arse, so why would anyone do it? Prestige?

I’m a nurse practitioner and EMT from way back, so I’m always packing a solid first aid kit when I ride. I ride a lot, but the only one I’ve had to help is moi.

I’d prefer to see more folks riding with their own kit, esp hydration, food, and clothing.

I’d support having experienced trail crew lapping trails on busy days to help out folks who break down or need some guidance.

Give me a free shuttle and I’d be up for that gig.
 
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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
Then Ski Patrol...costs for me to be a volunteer were $300+ per year.
As a paid patroller, my ski area pays my dues (~$40-50/year), but the current member dues for volunteers are still less than $100 ($60-80 for most). They vary based on geographic location and level of membership/medical training within NSP. I have never heard of $300 for a single year. NSP medical trainings are very affordable. OFC is $25 and OEC is $60 (plus a few bucks for division fees). I paid $2K for my EMT cert and it is similar to OEC. Send an email to [email protected] if you would like be more engaged, or if you have any questions. I don't have all the answers - thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Bruce-just noticed, you are the brand manager for ski patrol. Where are the program costs exposed on the site?

Comments I've received from several dozens of riders since patrolling was discontinued, "events just aren't the same without patrollers" and "we don't push as hard because we don't feel as safe". I'm in the midwest. The majority of our incidents were heat stroke and concussions. The clubs I volunteered for had radios, radio relay towers set up for courses with deep valleys, quarterly CPR training and first responder training, we were welcomed by all land managers and park districts. Its a shame the program no longer exists.
Yep! It depends on what specific training you are looking at and what level of membership you would like to join at. To give a ballpark, the first year of membership plus medical training is roughly $100-150 total. Following years are just the membership fee, which is in the ballpark of $50-80 depending on geographic division and membership level. For example, there are paid patrollers, volunteer patrollers, hosts, alumni, associate members, etc., that may or may not require a minimum level of medical training. Much of this is discussed on the nspserves.org/bikes webpage. If you have a specific patrol/training level in mind already or any other questions, send NSP an email to [email protected] to get a more exact number. Good question though!
 

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Discussion Starter #10
When I was a volunteer ski patrol, thirty plus years ago, the deal was you show up at the resort and offer to patrol, if they need a patroller you get a free lift ticket and they assign you some tasks.

This mountain bike patrol gig costs money and it’s a pain in the arse, so why would anyone do it? Prestige?

I’m a nurse practitioner and EMT from way back, so I’m always lacking a solid first aid kit when I ride. I ride a lot, but the only one I’ve had to help is moi.

I’d prefer to see more folks riding with their own kit, esp hydration, food, and clothing.

I’d support having experienced trail crew lapping trails on busy days to help out folks who break down or need some guidance.

Give me a free shuttle and I’d be up for that gig.
Totally! Quite a bit has changed in 30 years, especially from a liability and medical training perspective. NSP has over 31,000 members right now. ~80% of active patrollers are volunteers, ~20% are paid. The volunteers often get involved initially because of friends/family and continue to do it because they enjoy the community and volunteerism. There are other benefits like lift tickets and free or affordable avalanche and medical training. Please do take the survey linked above to share your thoughts directly to NSP!
 

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To be honest, since the trails I ride are BLM and NSF, there’s no liability to a private entity, so anyone riding the trails can provide first aid and they’re covered by the Good Sam.

However, as a medical provider my liability is high, so I’d be interested in knowing how being an official mountain bike patroller would protect me from liability.

I’d rather see a national bike group serve as the organizing entity. Having a ski patrol group involved is probably not a great idea; too much disconnect from trail building/maintenance/etc that forms the basi for mountain biking ethics.
 

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Premium Member
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When I was a volunteer ski patrol, thirty plus years ago, the deal was you show up at the resort and offer to patrol, if they need a patroller you get a free lift ticket and they assign you some tasks.

This mountain bike patrol gig costs money and it’s a pain in the arse, so why would anyone do it? Prestige?

I’m a nurse practitioner and EMT from way back, so I’m always packing a solid first aid kit when I ride. I ride a lot, but the only one I’ve had to help is moi.

I’d prefer to see more folks riding with their own kit, esp hydration, food, and clothing.

I’d support having experienced trail crew lapping trails on busy days to help out folks who break down or need some guidance.

Give me a free shuttle and I’d be up for that gig.
I have a solid idea of what I think I may start carrying this season, but I'm curious to hear what you bring on a ride. My brain tends to get trapped into the "but what if..." when I make decisions like that. :LOL:
 

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Yes. I was an active IMBA NMBP until SKI PATROL took over. Costs went up WAY UP when SKI PATROL took over the program. When IMBA ran the National MTB Patrol, I only had to pay for an IMBA membership, I covered my own CPR/First Responder training & training re-certifications, and volunteered at multiple events throughout the year: mtb races, xterra, and (foot races) 5k's.

Then Ski Patrol...costs for me to be a volunteer were $300+ per year. This coincided with IMBA's change in direction on a number of political issues impacting trail access. Suffice to say, both me and the 17 other patrollers I know, dropped both our IMBA memberships and did not pursue Ski Patrol. The MTB clubs I patrolled with echoed my own sentiments. All in all, the experience of NMBP to Ski Patrol has blemished and turned me off of volunteering.
Wow. I did and led an NMBP from 2005 to 2010ish. I guess the ski patrol thing happened after that.

I would have quit too. I couldn’t afford the $300 a year and all the training.
 
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