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I just replaced my stock headset in my new Trek 8500 using my brand new Nashbar headset press. I go this tool for $45 (on sale for $50 and I used a code I got here for another 10% off). This tool is super quality and a great buy. Looks like the same as Parks, and beats dropping $100+ on a Park or Pedro's.

I home built my headset press in the past (for my 1" road bike), but needed a new one for the larger size. I found this deal and decided to buy vs. make, and I am glad I did. Unless you are pressed for cash, buy this tool and use it for the rest of your life.
 

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I concur! I got the nashbar press for Christmas. I've used it to install one headset so far and it worked GREAT! I had used the threaded rod, washers, and nuts thing before and it worked...okay. This is great, the cups go in straight and true first shot, and the bearings on the top of the press keep it from spinning on the headset cups and marring the finish. For the home mechanic, it's all you'd ever need.

Comes with a nice storage bag as well! :)
 

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I scored!!

I saw your post and went straight over to Nashbar to rder the headset press. I then did a quick search for long sleeve jerseys. I found a Pearl Izumi Winter Slice for $34.99. The normal retail is $90.00. The winter slice is basically a Kodiak Light jersey with fancy stripes. I scored because I think it was a mistake because I checked the jersey price this morning and it was back to normal at $79.99. I did get an email confirmation last night with the correct item number and it showed the $34.99 price along with the headset press. I also used the 10% off coupon as well.
 

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Living the Dream
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Is it hard to install headsets yourself?

I have never done this before & I would hate to damage my CK Headset or Turner Frame. However, I hate paying $20-30 for having my LBS do a simple job (considering last time they messed up FSA Pig DH Pro) Anyways, if there is not much chance of screwing up my headset, I'll probably get one. Is it easy to remove headsets as well?

Thanks
 

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Alpenglow said:
Is it hard to install headsets yourself?...Is it easy to remove headsets as well?
Easier than you think! You can even save the cash and do it with a simple setup consisting of a bolt, nut & fender washers.

Removal is also pretty simple.

Homemade headset tools: https://forums.mtbr.com/showthread.php?t=130069

Remember that even the best tools in the hands of an uncaring or careless mechanic can result in a botched job.

 

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You have to be very careful with the homemade press.

I have the same homemade headset works if you are really really careful. However, I change frames so often that would prefer to use a pro caliber tool. The problem with the homemade tool is that If you are not really careful you will damage the headset and the frame as well. The main concern with the homemade press is that it doesn't hold center the cups on the frame, therefore, the user has to be aware that the press can pull the headset in a non parellel axis. Once, when I was in a big hurry, I came really close to smokin a CK headset because I was not paying attention. The bottom line is that you've got to be very careful with a home made press or you can just get a 50 dollar pro caliber tool and do it without much thinking at all. If I hadn't found such a good deal on this tool I would probably still be using my homemade press. INow I am wondering if the CK headset adapters will fit on this press. I know they will fit on the Park tool. Just my two cents.
 

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palmermtb said:
I have the same homemade headset works if you are really really careful. However, I change frames so often that would prefer to use a pro caliber tool. The problem with the homemade tool is that If you are not really careful you will damage the headset and the frame as well. The main concern with the homemade press is that it doesn't hold center the cups on the frame, therefore, the user has to be aware that the press can pull the headset in a non parellel axis. Once, when I was in a big hurry, I came really close to smokin a CK headset because I was not paying attention. The bottom line is that you've got to be very careful with a home made press or you can just get a 50 dollar pro caliber tool and do it without much thinking at all. If I hadn't found such a good deal on this tool I would probably still be using my homemade press. INow I am wondering if the CK headset adapters will fit on this press. I know they will fit on the Park tool. Just my two cents.
While my homemade press has worked good for these past couple of years, I prefer to do things on my own. It irritates me to high hell listening to my clutch burn away at the barely looking 16 year old pulls away with my car when it gets valet parked. I am the type of guy that cringes seeing other people work on my bikes let alone anything else. I am not saying that I could do a better job. I just feel better knowing that I did it....

geez, didn't that sound like some self help seminar.....

oh yeah, just ordered it 2 minutes ago (and apparently 2 days after the coupon expired, but it still worked).
 

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palmermtb said:
I saw your post and went straight over to Nashbar to rder the headset press. I then did a quick search for long sleeve jerseys. I found a Pearl Izumi Winter Slice for $34.99. The normal retail is $90.00. The winter slice is basically a Kodiak Light jersey with fancy stripes. I scored because I think it was a mistake because I checked the jersey price this morning and it was back to normal at $79.99. I did get an email confirmation last night with the correct item number and it showed the $34.99 price along with the headset press. I also used the 10% off coupon as well.
I got the jersey too along with the headset tool, and I have to say it's a very nice jersey for $35. :)
 

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I followed the Speedub.Nate method of installing headsets and my buddy and I got two headsets installed that way. The whole kit cost a whopping $5, and the cups were pressed in nice and evenly, and with a great amount of ease.

If I ever meet you, Speedub.Nate, I'm buying you a beer.
 

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The homemade press works fine. But, if I would have seen that cheap press from nashbar I probably would have gotten that instead. I used the homemade press with my CK and it took a little time because I couldn't get the headset to go in straight. Just go very slow.
 

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Do you need adapters in addition to the Nashbar Press

tootsjofus said:
The homemade press works fine. But, if I would have seen that cheap press from nashbar I probably would have gotten that instead. I used the homemade press with my CK and it took a little time because I couldn't get the headset to go in straight. Just go very slow.
To do CK headsets?
 

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Since the Nashbar press is a Park clone, do what a lot of people do with them. Take the "cones" off the press, and flip them around so that the flat side is pressing on the bottom of the cup instead of one of the staggered steps. Doing it the other way causes you to press the headset in by the bearing which is supposedly bad. I've seen and heard of people doing it both ways and it really all seems about the same in the end. Which ever way makes you comfortable.
 

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TACSTS, could you explain what you mean? Why would the bearing have been placed in the cup anyway?

TACSTS said:
them. Take the "cones" off the press, and flip them around so that the flat side is pressing on the bottom of the cup instead of one of the staggered steps. Doing it the other way causes you to press the headset in by the bearing which is supposedly bad. I've seen and heard of people doing it both ways and it really all seems about the same in the end. Which ever way makes you comfortable.
 

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Screaming deal on a good headset press, that Nashbar is.
And an awesome tutorial video!!
That said, I install my headsets (Kings, at that) by greasing the cups and headtube up, hand fitting them as straight as can be, and using my bench vise (I can hear the groans now) to slowly push everything together about 95% in. Then I realign and go all the way; of course the vise's teeth are protected with several rags.

15 years and no problems. Of course I do not recommend this method to anyone except for the lucky, lazy and those with extra headset purchase money laying around.
 

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westin said:
I install my headsets (Kings, at that) by greasing the cups and headtube up, hand fitting them as straight as can be, and using my bench vise...
No groans, really. This is absolutely no different than the bolt & fender washer method, and for that matter, the Park and Nashbar tools are only fancy variations of that.

Trust me, pleanty of non-bike related stuff needs to get pressed all the time and simple mechanical advantage is the means to do it (if not a hammer). The Nashbar tool looks great, but again, it's the patience and caring of the mechanic who ultimately determines the success of any particular method.
 

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jasong said:
TACSTS, could you explain what you mean? Why would the bearing have been placed in the cup anyway?
Some headsets, especially higher end headsets have the bearings pressed in, there is no easy pratical way to remove them. I have the park headset press (which I knew about the nashbar press... :eek: ) and I do the same thing, flip the cones upside down, seems to work great.
 

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Speedub.Nate said:
No groans, really. This is absolutely no different than the bolt & fender washer method, and for that matter, the Park and Nashbar tools are only fancy variations of that.

Trust me, pleanty of non-bike related stuff needs to get pressed all the time and simple mechanical advantage is the means to do it (if not a hammer). The Nashbar tool looks great, but again, it's the patience and caring of the mechanic who ultimately determines the success of any particular method.
What you say is true, but, a good headset press makes it a little easier and quicker. I've been wrenching for about 30 years now, and If I can find a tool that saves me time and frustration without compromising the quality of work I want, I'll buy it and use it. I don't reecommend that anyone who isn't willing to spend the time to get the job done right wrench anything.
 
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