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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I've demoed the sb150 and the Ripmo basically back to back on the same trails. Both had the X2 shock. I'm a hair under 6', currently 235#, and both were large frames.

Very similar feeling bikes. The SB front end wandered maybe a touch more when climbing steep stuff, but the cockpit felt a bit more roomy too - seemed better pedaling flat than the Ripmo, where I felt pushed forward a bit. Both suspensions climbed very well. The SB rear wasn't as plush feeling, but I'm chalking that up to the shock setup more than anything. I imagine it can be set up to equal the DW link's plush and small bump feel - I would assume easing up some on the dampening would take care of this. The Ripmo seemed a tad more willing to pop, manual, and jump. Although at times I didn't feel I was going as fast on the SB, my segment times were 5-15% faster on the SB both climbing and descending. The SB has more travel, which is always a good thing to me climbing and stuff being otherwise equal. Also, I think some of the faster times had to do with me riding the same trail on consecutive days, the SB being second, and not having ridden that particular trail in a couple seasons.

If they had them sitting next to each other in the showroom and I could walk out with one, I think I'd pick the Ripmo by a hair. But if I have to wait a month for a Ripmo and can get the SB in a couple days, I will probably go with the SB.

But I'm wondering if there are other differences I'm not aware of that could sway me? Does the yeti suspension require more maintenance, for example? I'm a touch leery of the Switch, just because I don't really know how it works. I'm not a tinkerer or a real maintenance lover, lol...I don't like to spend my evenings in the garage playing with the bike.

I'm down to the minutiae, so to speak.
 

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For trail riding I feel the Ripmo is a better platform, but if you are faster on the SB150, that's what I would buy, regardless of the wait.

I think the suspension set up stiffer on the SB150 contributed to the bike seeming to pedal better than the Ripmo. Once you had the shocks at equal plushness the difference would be minimal but in favor of the Ripmo.

Good luck.
 

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Rollin 29s
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If you are tall, be aware of the steeper ST angle contributing more to wrist and hand pressure on the Ripmo. Worse on flat or rolling terrain. Ripmo is going to feel like you need to drop the post for even moderate downhill sections due to the steep forward seat tube, but that’s why it climbs so well.

Pedal strikes are more common on most new geo platform bikes.

I unfortunately didn’t have the option to demo the SB150, but if I were in your shoes, I’d pay attention to comfort as well as handling. You can’t easily improve an uncomfortable bike without throwing a lot of money at components. If the geometry is close enough that both bikes climb, descend and handle comparably, choose the one that feels right even if the other one edges it out on performance.

I have a Ripmo, and I love how it performs, but I’ve thrown a lot of money and time at components, suspension tuning, adjustments and positioning to improve the hand pressure. It’s close but not quite there.


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If you are tall, be aware of the steeper ST angle contributing more to wrist and hand pressure on the Ripmo. Worse on flat or rolling terrain. Ripmo is going to feel like you need to drop the post for even moderate downhill sections due to the steep forward seat tube, but that's why it climbs so well.

Pedal strikes are more common on most new geo platform bikes.

I unfortunately didn't have the option to demo the SB150, but if I were in your shoes, I'd pay attention to comfort as well as handling. You can't easily improve an uncomfortable bike without throwing a lot of money at components. If the geometry is close enough that both bikes climb, descend and handle comparably, choose the one that feels right even if the other one edges it out on performance.

I have a Ripmo, and I love how it performs, but I've thrown a lot of money and time at components, suspension tuning, adjustments and positioning to improve the hand pressure. It's close but not quite there.

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Fantastic response- what good is performance if you can't dial In comfort.

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Towlie for prez
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I live in the Denver area, Yeti central. THere are stories after stories of people breaking rear triangles on Yetis. That's why they are for sale with "new" rear triangles. Not vague, just the truth. They typically buy a GG after their rear triangles break. Full disclosure... I'm not a Yeti owner.
 

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I live in the Denver area, Yeti central. THere are stories after stories of people breaking rear triangles on Yetis. That's why they are for sale with "new" rear triangles. Not vague, just the truth. They typically buy a GG after their rear triangles break. Full disclosure... I'm not a Yeti owner.
I'm on pinkbike now - zero new rear triangle adds

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I decided to take a lunch ride on the SB150 before I turned it back in. I opened up the low speed compression a few clicks and the high speed one or two. Made a pretty big difference -- the rear felt a lot more compliant climbing and a little more supple on the descent. Maybe another click or two on the high speed and I think it would be pretty dialed.

I think the Ripmo still felt a touch quicker and more agile, but they are pretty much neck and neck. Probably going to go Ripmo if the LBS can get one in a reasonable amount of time.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
You're me (hair under 6' and ~235#). I'm curious what other bikes you tried and ruled out. And why.

Both those are on my radar, as well as the 130, Offering and Sentinel. Not that I'm in any hurry to be rid of my Smuggler, but who knows?
Well, pretty slack with a steeper seat tube, a burly fork, and 160 mm travel up front are basic requirements, which narrows the field quite a bit off the bat. I rode a SC Hightower LT and didn't like it much at all, to be honest. It was the lumbering bike I always imagined a 29'er to be. I felt like I was "on top" of it and it was tough to get the front wheel off the ground, at least as compared to what I am used to. I took the new Ripley for a quick cruise, but wanted a little bit more bike.

I have ridden the HD4 on the same trail as I rode the SB150 on today, a complete ride last summer and a half-climb in May when the demo van was in town. Honestly, after both rides on the HD4, I was thinking "this is my bike." My complete ride was late July last year, and I was in better shape, but I pr'ed the climb (3.2 miles, 1200 ft) and was within 15 seconds of a PR coming back down, which happens to be well within the top 10% all time on that trail (humble brag to say I kinda know what I'm doing on the downhill side...uphill is another story, lol). On the half-climb route in May, riding the HD4 and Ripmo on consecutive (so conditioning is equal, lol), I was 30 seconds quicker up on the HD and about 30 seconds quicker down. I know Strava times aren't everything, but ...

The HD4 basically feels like a better version of my Enduro, if that makes sense. Maybe that's why I'm faster on it right away? The 29'ers feel like different machines in a way. I'm more off the back on the Enduro and HD4, front wheel off the ground all the time, in the air a lot... On the long 29'ers, I'm over the front bars more on the downhill. You need to weight the front tire on corners more on the 29'ers, it feels like to me. I imagine once I get used to that, I'll be just as fast or faster than ever.

Idk, tough decision. I was talking to the LBS owner when I dropped the SB off, and commented that according to Strava, I had been quite a bit quicker on the HD4 both up and down then on either 29'er (again, conditioning being an immeasurable). He was surprised. He said he'd get me whatever I wanted, but commented that "there's a reason no one is really coming out with a new 27" bike right now." Which is kind of my own conclusion, too, and what turned me off to the HD4 even though I liked the initial ride on the HD4 better. I don't know if that's a good conclusion or not, lol.
 

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Well, pretty slack with a steeper seat tube, a burly fork, and 160 mm travel up front are basic requirements, which narrows the field quite a bit off the bat. I rode a SC Hightower LT and didn't like it much at all, to be honest. It was the lumbering bike I always imagined a 29'er to be. I felt like I was "on top" of it and it was tough to get the front wheel off the ground, at least as compared to what I am used to. I took the new Ripley for a quick cruise, but wanted a little bit more bike.

I have ridden the HD4 on the same trail as I rode the SB150 on today, a complete ride last summer and a half-climb in May when the demo van was in town. Honestly, after both rides on the HD4, I was thinking "this is my bike." My complete ride was late July last year, and I was in better shape, but I pr'ed the climb (3.2 miles, 1200 ft) and was within 15 seconds of a PR coming back down, which happens to be well within the top 10% all time on that trail (humble brag to say I kinda know what I'm doing on the downhill side...uphill is another story, lol). On the half-climb route in May, riding the HD4 and Ripmo on consecutive (so conditioning is equal, lol), I was 30 seconds quicker up on the HD and about 30 seconds quicker down. I know Strava times aren't everything, but ...

The HD4 basically feels like a better version of my Enduro, if that makes sense. Maybe that's why I'm faster on it right away? The 29'ers feel like different machines in a way. I'm more off the back on the Enduro and HD4, front wheel off the ground all the time, in the air a lot... On the long 29'ers, I'm over the front bars more on the downhill. You need to weight the front tire on corners more on the 29'ers, it feels like to me. I imagine once I get used to that, I'll be just as fast or faster than ever.

Idk, tough decision. I was talking to the LBS owner when I dropped the SB off, and commented that according to Strava, I had been quite a bit quicker on the HD4 both up and down then on either 29'er (again, conditioning being an immeasurable). He was surprised. He said he'd get me whatever I wanted, but commented that "there's a reason no one is really coming out with a new 27" bike right now." Which is kind of my own conclusion, too, and what turned me off to the HD4 even though I liked the initial ride on the HD4 better. I don't know if that's a good conclusion or not, lol.
There are an insane amount excellent bikes out right now - more than anytime before with the explosion of the boutique brand segment.

Santa Cruz used to be unique- they are approaching Camaro like status.
Everyone has a SC I ride with.

I'm looking Pivot - people rave about the Switchblade.

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No kidding...never seen somebody be so negative about a couple of bikes in so many threads. He should just change his name to "anti-bex".
Hey Hey Hey, Leave me out of this.....I'm turning over a new leaf
 
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