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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
When descending a trail, even a small, insignificant wash, what must one do?

a- Slide your butt completely back off the seat
b- contemplate dropping your seat
c- stay directly above the seat thereby nutting yourself when the bike bounces

I can tell you which one is the wrong answer...

John
 

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Yup, pretty sure we've all been there at some point or another... It's that split second before the pain hits, when you realize "That's why you slide back off the saddle."
 

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dirt visionary
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the only time to slide back is on something stupid steep otherwise its just bad riding posture . At one time I used to lower seat or ride way back but now I ride just fine no matter where my seat is . Jumps,steeps ect. If you need examples look at racers of all types and look at seat height.The seat is a very useful tool when cornering and such .
 

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How much further ???
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I would say c minus the nutting yourself. You always want to stay balanced on your bike and if it is a small insignificant wash, option a and b seem way to extreme.
 

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If you are too far back you actually lose control and start skidding. Keeping the right amount of weight on the front end/brake is crucial for staying in control. A lot of old school xc guys like to talk bad about some of our steep trails here in Flag and dh riding, what they don't realize is that by saying "those are skid trails" they are basically saying that they can't ride very well.
 

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If you are too far back you actually lose control and start skidding. Keeping the right amount of weight on the front end/brake is crucial for staying in control. A lot of old school xc guys like to talk bad about some of our steep trails here in Flag and dh riding, what they don't realize is that by saying "those are skid trails" they are basically saying that they can't ride very well.
Sorry, I have to call BS. Some of them ARE skidder trails. They are technical only because they are excessively fall-line steep and eroded. The gnar comes from the fact that they are blown out. Sections of upper Wasabi, Double D, Pickle, and Ginger all fall into that category. Guess I'm just an old-school XC guy, but surely that isn't the standard you are presenting to the FS for the DH trail options as part of MEDL.
 

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See that's interesting for me to read.

a. I rarely slide my ass fully back behind the seat, really rarely.
b. Don't have a dropper post and am certainly not stopping to get my mini tool kit out to find the right sized allen wrench to drop my post
c. Have only ever done damage to the jewels trying to stand with a bike that had too high a top tube.
 

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PMP,TAN,LAUNDRY
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Stay low and balanced as mentioned above. Not so much about being behind the bike as it is staying low and loose.
 

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I still don't understand how you bang up your jewels on the seat of the bike. If your bike up comes suddenly so do your pedals and legs push you up as well - keeping your nutsack to seat distance intact.
If you have no leg muscles to absorb the bumps - maybe you should try road biking.

Most injuries are to knees, shins, arms and hips. That's why you see people wear knee or elbow pads. I never heard of bikers wearing groin protector. Maybe in some crazy downhill situations...
 

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I would say c minus the nutting yourself. You always want to stay balanced on your bike and if it is a small insignificant wash, option a and b seem way to extreme.

Right. There are times to drop the seat, but frankly their many riders that do it just fine without dropping the seat at all. It depends on how nasty the terrain is to be honest. As for going way back again it depends on how steep the section of the trail is and it comes down to balance. Finding the right balance point is key and in some places you need to go way back an others you don't. You need to find the balance point. Remember weight on the front wheel helps you turn so you can't be back all the time.

As for nutting yourself it happened because you did not let the bike move under you properly. If have you balance and weight on wrong the bike can bounce up an bite you. Done right the bike will float under you.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I still don't understand how you bang up your jewels on the seat of the bike. If your bike up comes suddenly so do your pedals and legs push you up as well - keeping your nutsack to seat distance intact.
If you have no leg muscles to absorb the bumps - maybe you should try road biking.
If your front wheel drops at the same time the back wheel kicks up making the crank the pivot point, it's easier than you might think. And thanks for the sideways swipe, so far the membership here is running 50/50 between helpful to n00bs and elitist pricks.

Par for the course.

John
 

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If your front wheel drops at the same time the back wheel kicks up making the crank the pivot point, it's easier than you might think....
John
This is where you need the right balance and movement on the bike. You need let the bike float under you and let both arms and legs move with the bike. The seat coming and biting you is not because you need a dropper or need to be farther back, but and issue of how you are letting the bike move under you.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
This is where you need the right balance and movement on the bike. You need let the bike float under you and let both arms and legs move with the bike. The seat coming and biting you is not because you need a dropper or need to be farther back, but and issue of how you are letting the bike move under you.
That's kind of what I figured. The trick is finding out how to let the bike move. :)

John
 

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If your front wheel drops at the same time the back wheel kicks up making the crank the pivot point, it's easier than you might think. And thanks for the sideways swipe, so far the membership here is running 50/50 between helpful to n00bs and elitist pricks.

Par for the course.

John
Don't take it personally....it was probably meant as a joke. Besides, my reply to the sideways swipe would have been "yes, because we all know how spindly road bikers legs are....."

I think most folks are just being reminded of the little things that we probably all had problems with when we were first learning to ride. At some point, making those adjustments to rocks, drops, in and out of washes etc., will become pretty much automatic. You'll get there.
 

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If your front wheel drops at the same time the back wheel kicks up making the crank the pivot point, it's easier than you might think. And thanks for the sideways swipe, so far the membership here is running 50/50 between helpful to n00bs and elitist pricks.

Par for the course.

John
It doesn't matter how the back up wheel comes up. The force come through the pedals, your feet and your legs. Your legs contain the most powerful muscles in your body. The fact that you are getting hit in the nutsack means only two things:

1. You have weak leg muscles - not a sideswipe - but you provided no details on who you are, where you ride, how you ride and even what kind of bike do you ride. It's a HT I presume?

2. You did not take the time to research a proper MTB stance (or proper seat height). There are hundreds of free articles and videos on the web.
 

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If you're on an XC bike with a relatively long wheel base and have the seat height at the generally recommended height sometimes the only way to get centered on steeps is to drop behind the saddle a bit.
I'm tall with a long inseam (read: really, really we'll endowed). It's hard to get balanced without dropping the seat on steeps on an XC bike. On a shorter wheelbase bike (especially for the less endowed) it's not so difficult.
In this photo if I were not behind my face would be in the dirt.
 

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That picture above shows one technique to hand a drop like that. That is really a rather large drop that you could choose to role as chongoman or you could choose to wheelie drop. I don't recognize that spot so how you handle it does depend on the approach and rollout as well.

Point is you need to work up to stuff like that and do what works for you. If you are new then I would not expect a noob rider to handle that with ease. Heck even some experience riders will just walk it over a drop like that as it can be risk vs reward thing. So guys really enjoy cleaning stuff that is hard and other don't mind not taking the risk as they get rewards other ways.
 
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