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No Fear
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This year in university we have a unit which through it we learned a mechanical engineering software called Solid works. Like all the other units all students just wanted to pass the exam and get rid of it but I really got interested in the software .In university we only had time to learn the basics but at home I spent many of my spare time discovering it . The first thing that got in my mind was MTB components I have made many MTB components with it such as DH frames ‘ Forks (just the outer leg ‘ crown ‘ stanchion and steering tube ) disc rotors ‘ handle bars rims and ………
But this time I attempted to make a frame with all standards and features . So I started dimensioning my Giant Iguana frame from the basic things like the diameter of the top tube to all the tiny and accurate distances . It took me 4 days to complete it ( each day I worked 2 or 3 hours on it ) and here it is . What do you think about it.
 

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Excellent job!

Solidworks is a great program to learn this early in your engineering career, so kudos to you for taking the extra time with your project. Obvioulsy the program is used around the globe, since you are in Iran! You might be able to continue working on this model once you take a course or two in finite elements - and you can import the geometry into programs such as ABAQUS or ANSYS. Thats where the engineers start to separate from the cad guys. ;-) Just looking at the features, though, I do see some very difficult areas to mesh, if not impossible. Perhaps you have a professor who has some experience in FEM and might be able to sit down with him and pick up some geometry tips?

But you certainly have a great career in engineering coming up for you. Hope you get to continue working on bikes and other beneficial projects to mankind.
 

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I like it!

I'm not an engineer, but it sure would be fun to design, build and test frames. Looks good Saber. Keep going with your passion.

Now for your next project, design a disc only SS with an eccentric BB. Steel or aluminum is fine, but I prefer Ti. I'd buy an affordable frame.
 

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Now broadcasting from CO
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Looks Great!

Now just build that baby up and you'll be ready to ride! Great job on the programming.
 

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.........................
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That's cool

Keep it up. Who knows, one day.... saber mtn. bikes from Iran may be the new shizznit!
 

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I dig trails!
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Nice one bro!

That is the key to college, leverage your passion to fullfill your learning. Certainly beats the fellow classmate's zombie walk to a degree. Also, others will pick up on your passion and will give you opportunities - which can lead to career moves.

Nice one on the frame, I like the downtube logo details in the metal.

Mr. P
 

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"El Whatever"
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WOW!!!

Awesome Dude!!!

When I was leaving school Autocad was starting to be used in Mexico's government schools... and our school still wasn't incorporated. I learned some basics at work.

Now I know what program to buy! Damn, it looks heavily cool!

Congratulations, you'll be a great engineer!
 

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Designated Bleeder
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Nice Frame

I spend all day in front of Solidworks as a design engineer. That's a nice model you put together there. Just a couple of things that you might want to consider going forward. Solidworks 2005 has a weldment plug-in so you can actually show welds in the model. Its pretty sweet but takes a bit of time to learn. But since you are already this far, you might as well just keep going.

Its great to see people in school taking some real interest in engineering. And if you need any solidworks or 3-D modeling, I eat, sleep and breathe that stuff, just shoot me a PM.

Nice work.
 

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No Fear
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Thanks

Tanks a lok Special K I have saw the weld elements but i have started learninig it a few days ago . It seems to work only on support gussets .And about the Cosmos simulation it doesnt work on multi body parts why would it be so.
But no worry ill chew all Solid works features and when its done maybe next year im looking forward on catya and Ansis but if i had questions ( i surely will have some) i will PM you . I really do like to work for a MTB company as a designer you know Im a rider my self i know the bike ' trail and rider demands and situations i think this would be a positive point for a bike frame designer.
Again thanks a lot and happy X mas .
 

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bi-winning
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That looks fun. Maybe i'll do that some day. I just have a few weeks before i must apply for university. Mechanical engineering is what i am going to apply for.
 

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"El Whatever"
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rkj__ said:
That looks fun. Mechanical engineering is what i am going to apply for.
You will not regret it. If there is a career that's fun you have only to choose from Gynecology or Mechanical Engineering. :D

With Gynecology you don't get to work on bikes... but you'll be able to afford nice bikes. With Mechanical Engineering ou get to work on almost every nice "toy" that comes to your imagination like bikes, cars, jet fighters, commercial liners, warships, you name it.

To me, Mechanical Engineering gets the nod here!

Seriously, the field of application of Mechanical engineering is too wide that you'll basically will find yourslef hard not to get a job.

Go for it!! Live it, breath it! You'll not regret it. It won't be easy. There are few careers more dificult than this one, but it's worth every sleepless night spent studying.
 

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bi-winning
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Warp2003 said:
You will not regret it. If there is a career that's fun you have only to choose from Gynecology or Mechanical Engineering. :D

With Gynecology you don't get to work on bikes... but you'll be able to afford nice bikes. With Mechanical Engineering ou get to work on almost every nice "toy" that comes to your imagination like bikes, cars, jet fighters, commercial liners, warships, you name it.

To me, Mechanical Engineering gets the nod here!

Seriously, the field of application of Mechanical engineering is too wide that you'll basically will find yourslef hard not to get a job.

Go for it!! Live it, breath it! You'll not regret it. It won't be easy. There are few careers more dificult than this one, but it's worth every sleepless night spent studying.
You sound like someone i would like to ride with :p Next time i am in mexico i'll give ya a shout. There is only the entirety of the USA between here and there :p haha
 

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Your frame looks great!

Solid works is a very very popular CAD package with a lot of support: It is quickly become THE default CAD package simply because it seems to nail the cost / performance balance nicely. It's probably the best software to learn right now: and your skills can transfer fairly easily to other packages (such as Pro-E) without too much trouble.

Here's some suggestions from someone who has spent a LOT of time using this software (and who is still learning!).

I noticed that your frame looks like it's one part model: you might want to think about making every "component" one part model and making your frame an assembly. This is nice because if you ever actually make your frame (or a different one), you can make drawings for every part (i.e. every tube, every CNC machined part, etc...) so that you know how to miter each tube and how to machine each part. This will also allow you to make vairable frame sizes while keeping the parts consistent.

You can also use configuration tables to quickly lay out different sizes, or even different frame geometries for each size. This gets really cool, because you can have the software "miter" the tubes for you for each different frame size, put welding / heat treating breath holes in the correct locations, etc...

Also, trust me on this one: take the time to lable ALL of your part features, parts and assemblies: I.e. if you make an extrusion for the head tube, then lable it "head tube". Then, if you make a revolve cut for the head set bearing seats, lable it "head tube bearing seats". Once your models and assemblies get fairly complicated, you'll spend a lot of time searching for a feature when you need to change it. Renaming it makes it way easier.

Here's a couple of pictures of the V-tach frame that we manufacture: Photoworks and other plug-ins can be a lot of fun too, but can suck up a lot of time to get everything just right. I'm sure some people are really, really fast with photoworks, but I don't spend enough time with it to make it worth while :)

Cheers and good luck!
 

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No Fear
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Tanx

That's really cool .Thanks for all the advertises specially the feature labeling is a useful point . I have 2 questions from you first how did you design the coil of the rear shock I mean what feature should I use to make the coil have natural travel while I push the rear wheel trough its travel .You know when I design a coil its not flexible and its just like a solid part .
Secondly how can I work with the photo works Im not familiar with it.
 

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knollybikes.com said:
Solid works is a very very popular CAD package with a lot of support: It is quickly become THE default CAD package simply because it seems to nail the cost / performance balance nicely. It's probably the best software to learn right now: and your skills can transfer fairly easily to other packages (such as Pro-E) without too much trouble.

Here's some suggestions from someone who has spent a LOT of time using this software (and who is still learning!).

I noticed that your frame looks like it's one part model: you might want to think about making every "component" one part model and making your frame an assembly. This is nice because if you ever actually make your frame (or a different one), you can make drawings for every part (i.e. every tube, every CNC machined part, etc...) so that you know how to miter each tube and how to machine each part. This will also allow you to make vairable frame sizes while keeping the parts consistent.

You can also use configuration tables to quickly lay out different sizes, or even different frame geometries for each size. This gets really cool, because you can have the software "miter" the tubes for you for each different frame size, put welding / heat treating breath holes in the correct locations, etc...

Also, trust me on this one: take the time to lable ALL of your part features, parts and assemblies: I.e. if you make an extrusion for the head tube, then lable it "head tube". Then, if you make a revolve cut for the head set bearing seats, lable it "head tube bearing seats". Once your models and assemblies get fairly complicated, you'll spend a lot of time searching for a feature when you need to change it. Renaming it makes it way easier.

Here's a couple of pictures of the V-tach frame that we manufacture: Photoworks and other plug-ins can be a lot of fun too, but can suck up a lot of time to get everything just right. I'm sure some people are really, really fast with photoworks, but I don't spend enough time with it to make it worth while :)

Cheers and good luck!
OMG that render is amazing, I'm designing a frame too, and believe or not I'm using Autocad :rolleyes:... It's because I'm studing Arquitecture and that's the program that we use all the time.

Right now I'm deciding which Bearings to use, designing pivots, bolts, washers and all that stuff. The last stage will be learning how to use a FEA program and check if the Frame is strong enough.

Bye.
 

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"Ride Lots" - Eddie Mercx
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the one feature both of you need to learn

is the <File> <Save As> <Save As JPG>!

then you can do away with the screen captures!

other than that, looks really sweet. my problem is that after sitting in front of CAD 8 hours a day for work, the last thing I want to do when I get home is work on it some more...............

YR
 

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"Ride Lots" - Eddie Mercx
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SABER_MTB said:
That's really cool .Thanks for all the advertises specially the feature labeling is a useful point . I have 2 questions from you first how did you design the coil of the rear shock I mean what feature should I use to make the coil have natural travel while I push the rear wheel trough its travel .You know when I design a coil its not flexible and its just like a solid part .
Secondly how can I work with the photo works Im not familiar with it.
photoworks is an add in that may or may not be supported in your version of the SW.

the coil would be built using a helical sweep. if you wanted it to be dynamic and not static you'd have to get relations set up in your assembly so that the height of the helix changes based on the compression setting. most likely, you'd have to adjust the rear wheel travel and then rebuild the model each time so it wouldn't be a smooth transition each time. not sure though. there are simulation packages that can make it look pretty but typically the CAD users are only concerned with the start, end, and maybe a point or two in the middle of the travel.

YR
 

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Yeti_Rider said:
photoworks is an add in that may or may not be supported in your version of the SW.

the coil would be built using a helical sweep. if you wanted it to be dynamic and not static you'd have to get relations set up in your assembly so that the height of the helix changes based on the compression setting. most likely, you'd have to adjust the rear wheel travel and then rebuild the model each time so it wouldn't be a smooth transition each time. not sure though. there are simulation packages that can make it look pretty but typically the CAD users are only concerned with the start, end, and maybe a point or two in the middle of the travel.

YR
Absolutely agree here: don't waste time on the coil. A helix is how I did it, I only have it rendered for the topped out static position. For sag, bottomed and flexible positions I have the spring suppressed as it rebuilds too slowly and is a big performance hit (AND it's not neccessary).

Cheers,
 
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