Mountain Bike Reviews Forum banner
1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
41 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I got a new Rig a couple of months ago, and I must say its winning the riding time competition against my sugar 3+. I used to just love my sugar but now, I am having 2nd thoughts.

It seems to me the sugar isn't any easier to ride. I don't get this because I thought SS's were supposed to be so much harder. But I guess since the SS is lighter than the gearie, I end up doing less work on the same course. Maybe the 29 inch tires on the SS make it seem easier as well.

Anyone have any insight into this? Am I being assimilated? Whatsa matta wit me?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
94 Posts
I hear ya.

I went from having the SS as a 2nd bike to my Santa Cruz Superlight. I ditched the FS idea and bought a 5" gearie hardtail to go with my rigid On One.

After a few rides I was convinced gears had to go, so I sold the gearie on ebay and have ordered a spanking new 29er SS Retrotec.

Gears just make things too complicated! :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,888 Posts
Nuttin'sa matta wit ya, you've just gone through what most people go through when they find SS!

It happened to me a few months back and I posted a very similar post back then! I've since sold all my geared and suspended bikes, and now solely ride my Dekerf everywhere!

Next thing you know you'll be going rigid, like I've just done, and that brings even more fun to the party!
 

·
I already rode that
Joined
·
1,632 Posts
29 might help on some things but its usually just learning how to ride better is what some ppl like about SS. Besides saving some weight :) I say learning how to ride better mainly cause you have to learn to keep speed up or else you'll suffer on climbs. Which I guess alot of ppl dont really learn while while on bikes with gears mainly cause they see the hill and drop to their granny... :rolleyes:
 

·
Retro Grouch
Joined
·
2,091 Posts
When it comes to bikes, you rock!

When you're running you don't need gears, the same with bicycling. Ridng off road with a geared bike you have to make dozens of decisions every five mimutes or so, and with a single speed it's one or two (speed up or slow down); it's more about a thing called fun; go with it :thumbsup: you'll be a happier person; and some guy will get a great deal on a FS gearie; it's a win win situation ;) .

1G1G, Brad
 

·
American Made!
Joined
·
321 Posts
I've got to chime in...... I kept thinking gears are the savior. I spend all winter riding single and then when racing comes around I hop on the gearie. Last season was my first season racing and I used my SS for the first 3 races, did great. Got a geared hardtail, blew the derailluer the next race! great luck!
I raced 24 hours of Moab on my SS, I actually did o.k.
Now live in southern california and thought I need a gearie to make it up some of this stuff, originally from MN, and now I am back in the same boat....got a brand new hardtail but find myself riding my SS alot more, I commute on a CX SS, go figure!...I am not sure that a geared bike is really all that faster than a SS...someone please help a lost soul out!!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
41 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
The ride that prompted this thread was on my geary. Yesterday, I rode my SS again. What a difference. I have lately been thinking about selling that geary, as some have suggested. I used to love that bike...a sweet sugar.

Man, how some things change. Honestly, I don't know if its the SS, or the 29 inch tires. I was thinking, maybe I just need a sugar 293....or maybe I should sell the sugar and get a 2nd SS....decisions, decisions.....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,144 Posts
I ran the same 24 Hour race two years in a row and found that I had faster times on the single speed than when I did it the first time with gears. I lost a little bit of time on one downhill section that was just right for cranking the big ring, but on the long climb back to the starting line (this was 24 Hours of Adrenaline at Laguna Seca for those of you who have ridden it) I more than made up for it because I had to maintain a higher speed since granny wasn't around to bail me out. Bottom line - I go faster with only one gear.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,077 Posts
my FS gearie would kick my singlespeeds ass in a fight... it outwieghs it by a good 20 pounds.

i still like to ride a big girl sometimes... she may not be fast up the hills but she has lotsa cushin for the pushin going down.
 

·
Weiner Dog Connoiseur
Joined
·
1,013 Posts
I just started riding SS. I did it first out of curiosity just to see what it was all about. I used a '98 Mongoose Switchback as my "test bed". I threw a bunch of cast-off parts onto it from my other bikes onto it, some SS parts, and lo and behold! The bike was incredibly fun to ride and virtually bulletproof. I have a Trek Fuel 70 FS and a Klein Pulse Comp hardtail gearie, but I keep finding myself gravitating towards my "mongrel" Mongoose SS.

When I go and ride the Klein, which tips in at almost the same weight of the Mongoose SS, but with gears, I'm simply amazed at the gears that I am capable of turning comfortably. SS does make you a stronger rider.

On the Fuel 70, which is significantly heavier, I don't find as much of a difference, but I do find that I can run gears one or two sprockets higher than I typically did on the same terrain before I rode SS. I think if I lightened the Fuel a bit, there would be a bigger difference.
 

·
change is good
Switchblade with a 38, 29+ rigid WaltWorks
Joined
·
3,836 Posts
Sigh....

My very expensive, beautiful, but as of lately little used FS sits looking pretty in my garage next to my muddy WW. Maybe when the trails are less muddy and overgrown, I'll ride the FS more:rolleyes:
 

·
Mtbr Forum Sponsor - Homebrewed Components
Joined
·
2,419 Posts
SaxMan said:
I just started riding SS. I did it first out of curiosity just to see what it was all about. I used a '98 Mongoose Switchback as my "test bed". I threw a bunch of cast-off parts onto it from my other bikes onto it, some SS parts, and lo and behold! The bike was incredibly fun to ride and virtually bulletproof. I have a Trek Fuel 70 FS and a Klein Pulse Comp hardtail gearie, but I keep finding myself gravitating towards my "mongrel" Mongoose SS.

When I go and ride the Klein, which tips in at almost the same weight of the Mongoose SS, but with gears, I'm simply amazed at the gears that I am capable of turning comfortably. SS does make you a stronger rider.

On the Fuel 70, which is significantly heavier, I don't find as much of a difference, but I do find that I can run gears one or two sprockets higher than I typically did on the same terrain before I rode SS. I think if I lightened the Fuel a bit, there would be a bigger difference.
it makes you stronger, but not faster. There is a difference. I can whip my semipro friend's ass on every steep climb but he is still faster and finishes before me. You use different muscles standing up than you do sitting in the saddle and if all you do is stand up and grind the hills, you'll loose your abillity to sit in the saddle and spin an efficient gear over a good distance. Sitting in the saddle IS a faster, more efficent way of pedaling on moderately steep and long hills. Not exactly easy to pull up with your feet when you're out of saddle, is it? I've gotten much slower now that i spend most of my time on the SS even though i am stronger. I have switched back to gears for a bit to get my speed up again. Also, i have noticed it is much easier to get my heart rate up on the geared bike than it is on the SS in most situations. Dont get me wrong, i LOVE my SS and i enjoy riding it but i think i made a mistake letting my geared bike sit for so long.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
371 Posts
ISuckAtRiding said:
it makes you stronger, but not faster. There is a difference. I can whip my semipro friend's ass on every steep climb but he is still faster and finishes before me. You use different muscles standing up than you do sitting in the saddle and if all you do is stand up and grind the hills, you'll loose your abillity to sit in the saddle and spin an efficient gear over a good distance. Sitting in the saddle IS a faster, more efficent way of pedaling on moderately steep and long hills. Not exactly easy to pull up with your feet when you're out of saddle, is it? I've gotten much slower now that i spend most of my time on the SS even though i am stronger. I have switched back to gears for a bit to get my speed up again. Also, i have noticed it is much easier to get my heart rate up on the geared bike than it is on the SS in most situations. Dont get me wrong, i LOVE my SS and i enjoy riding it but i think i made a mistake letting my geared bike sit for so long.
my guess is that this is the reason why many XC and enduro racers do most of their training on a road bike.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
I completely agree with your take Riptide and am feeling the same. I got a Rig and have been using it with slicks as a commuter for a few weeks and am totally impressed by the bike on-road in traffic.

However, my last 3 trail rides were all back at stock gearing and tires on the Rig: I'm loving every second of it. Climbing seems more fun and far more involved. There is something great about just pedaling through everything without feeling the transmission slip or dealing with gear changes before every little section. Heck, I've never been so proud of making it to the top of the local canyon without dabbing or resting!

It seems to go through rough stuff just as well as my FS 26" geared bike, but in a more 'graceful'(?) way. Those 29" tires take 18-24" dropoffs in stride! Also enjoying the clearance in the middle for riding over logs and up steps, it just seems so much easier than on the old bike, which is about to become a 1x9.
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top