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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
He pukes every time we go for a ride. But its only when we stop for a rest, after stopping for about 1 min he starts getting very nauseated, and pukes. Give him another min and hes ready to ride another 10 miles or whatever. He has tryed eating well before the ride, not eating, taking fluids a few hours before, just before the ride. At first we thought it was just that he was out of shape, but now that hes in much better shape he still gets sick if we stop after just 2 or 3 miles into a 15+ mile ride.

Anyone had this problem before and find a way to over come it?

thanks,

Eric
 

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Yeah I've seen this before. His body is not prepared for the exertion. Too much too soon. He needs some time to warm up before working so hard. Start slower and build up slowly.
 

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Wedgy said:
He pukes every time we go for a ride. But its only when we stop for a rest, after stopping for about 1 min he starts getting very nauseated, and pukes. Give him another min and hes ready to ride another 10 miles or whatever. He has tryed eating well before the ride, not eating, taking fluids a few hours before, just before the ride. At first we thought it was just that he was out of shape, but now that hes in much better shape he still gets sick if we stop after just 2 or 3 miles into a 15+ mile ride.

Anyone had this problem before and find a way to over come it?

thanks,

Eric
I have had this happen to me too. It may have been the heat and having excessive water in my stomach. Maybe a motion sickness kind of thing. I seem to feel a lot better when I mix about 50% gatorade in with the water though.

If it is motion sickness because of the equalibrim or something you might suggest he take a ginger pill before the ride. Any health food store will have them. It may help.
 

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Wedgy said:
He pukes every time we go for a ride. But its only when we stop for a rest, after stopping for about 1 min he starts getting very nauseated, and pukes. Give him another min and hes ready to ride another 10 miles or whatever. He has tryed eating well before the ride, not eating, taking fluids a few hours before, just before the ride. At first we thought it was just that he was out of shape, but now that hes in much better shape he still gets sick if we stop after just 2 or 3 miles into a 15+ mile ride.

Anyone had this problem before and find a way to over come it?

thanks,

Eric
He should see his doctor...may be just "acid reflux"

http://www.medicinenet.com/gastroesophageal_reflux_disease_gerd/page3.htm

or something more serious...it should be looked at
 

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Wedgy said:
He pukes every time we go for a ride. But its only when we stop for a rest, after stopping for about 1 min he starts getting very nauseated, and pukes. Give him another min and hes ready to ride another 10 miles or whatever. He has tryed eating well before the ride, not eating, taking fluids a few hours before, just before the ride. At first we thought it was just that he was out of shape, but now that hes in much better shape he still gets sick if we stop after just 2 or 3 miles into a 15+ mile ride.

Anyone had this problem before and find a way to over come it?

thanks,

Eric
don't eat bananas try Endurolytes instead. Also start real slow, warm up for a few miles before you push hard.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
cool, thanks for the Ideas, Ill have him try some of that stuff.

Im also thinking that it may not be the warm up, but more the cool down, as we tend to stop at the top of long hills when we are winded. May be stop before the hills, or keep going for a bit after the hill to cool down.
 

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This used to happen to me all the time...

years ago, when I first started riding seriously. After just a short while on the trail (usually after a climb), I'd be overwhelmed with nausea and have to lie down. My riding buddies got used to casually looking the other way while I heaved. It usually passed in a minute or two, and then I'd be fine for the rest of the day.

I asked my Dad, who's a doc, about it. He told me it'd probably go away as I developed better bike specific fitness. But in the meantime, he gave me a tip to help with the nausea. He told me to fill a water bottle with flat Coca Cola and take a swig from time to time on the trail, to keep my blood sugar balanced and ward off the dizziness that came in part from my body's rushing to burn fuel to meet the demand. Sounded weird to me, but lo and behold, it worked. Eventually, the problem cleared up on its own, as my body got used to the sport. Haven't had a problem since.

Might be worth a try. I'd guess any sugary soft drink would do. But even so, good advice above. If he's concerned, he should ask his doc.
 

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zasky said:
years ago, when I first started riding seriously. After just a short while on the trail (usually after a climb), I'd be overwhelmed with nausea and have to lie down. My riding buddies got used to casually looking the other way while I heaved. It usually passed in a minute or two, and then I'd be fine for the rest of the day.

I asked my Dad, who's a doc, about it. He told me it'd probably go away as I developed better bike specific fitness. But in the meantime, he gave me a tip to help with the nausea. He told me to fill a water bottle with flat Coca Cola and take a swig from time to time on the trail, to keep my blood sugar balanced and ward off the dizziness that came in part from my body's rushing to burn fuel to meet the demand. Sounded weird to me, but lo and behold, it worked. Eventually, the problem cleared up on its own, as my body got used to the sport. Haven't had a problem since.

Might be worth a try. I'd guess any sugary soft drink would do. But even so, good advice above. If he's concerned, he should ask his doc.
Good advice.. Flat cola really does act as a blood sugar regulator. I had this happen to me before, sure enough though, in time it simply went away as my endurance level increased.
 

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Heres another idea. Don't stop. Once you stop lactic acid will start to build up in your muscles immediatley, after the first 30 seconds things can start going bad, could result in vomiting.

I learned this when I started backpacking years ago and we would head up into the mountains, as a KS kid the physical exertion would be awful. So it was either no stopping unless you were tightening a strap for less than 30 seconds or you planned to stop for more than 10 minutes.
 

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It is the warm up

Or the lack thereof. Are you guys warming at all and bringing your heart rate up slowly or do you jump right in fast and hard climbing the hills? If his heart rate is increasing too fast to a level beyond his aerobic level then I would bet this is what is causing him to puke. It happens to every beginner we bring on our normal ride, the guys who are in really good shape have no problem.
 

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I can be a bit prone to this on hot days, but have easily adapted. Most key thing is to not immediately stop at the top of a hard climb on a warm day, but instead do little circles to cool down better. Also start off well hydrated. I also have extra problems if I do a morning ride on a hot day after having coffee -- not sure it it's more the dehyrating effect, the extra heart rate or how it affects my stomach. Also avoid any fat or too much protien in the stomach on hot and hard pushing rides since they require more water in the stomach to digest... keep to complex carbs instead.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Ill have him try that cola thing, see if that helps.

As for a warm up, we normaly just start off on the trail after a few min of streching, going easy for maybe a mile give or take. thats when I normaly "feel" ready to kick it up a bit.
What do you guys do for a warm up? more, less?
 

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If it's just after a long hill climb or prolonged heavy exertion, it might just be lactic acid build up in his legs. The build up of lactic acid makes you sick to your stomach. I use to lift using a high intensity workout program. The program requires you to max out reps. After a while your arms and legs built up so much lactic acid that your body doesn't buffer it fast enough thus people get sick and often puke. Puke buckets were a standard in the weight room that year. I get the same thing during some of the longer hill climbs or back to back climbing without any chance to recover. The body tends to adapt and increase your lactic threshold the fitter you become. However, if you don't hit the lactic threshold that often it doesn't increase. Google lactic acid threshold pertaining to basic exercise physiology. Some people have a higher lactic acid threshold than others due to fitness or genetics.
 

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Do a search on "AT levels". This might be th' prob.
Anaerobic Threshold
"The anaerobic threshold occurs during exercise and is the point at which your muscles are using more oxygen than your heart and lungs can deliver. When you reach the anaerobic threshold you generally feel tired, short of breath, and your heartbeat is rapid. Be sure to CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN to be sure it's safe for you to exercise to this level."

"The anaerobic threshold generally occurs at 80 to 85 percent of your maximum heart rate."

This used to plague the crap out of me. I would get so hot so quick I felt like I was gonna blow chunks too. Fitness level coming up made th' difference. Sounds like the other posts concerning lactic acid are probably the issue considering the symptoms you discribe. A man lactating is just not right.:ciappa:
As someone else mentioned, it's best not to stop. You should keep "spinning" the cranks in a low enough gear combo that doesn't require any effort, until the burn subsides, then resume riding, climbing, .etc. The light spinning burns off the lactic acid. This technique was developed, I believe by the olympic trainers. Correct me if I'm wrong. Anyways it works for me & my 43lb. Bullit, (black), after an extended climb. A roadie bud of mine told me about it.
 

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All the responses seem reasonable...

...especially from the poster's doctor dad, but I think it comes down to plain physical fitness. It's just the combination of your friend's level of fitness and the difficulty of the climbs/rides. I'm getting the impression that you are taking him to rides that you normally do, and he's never done before. Although he is getting "better", as compared to his weeks before, it is still not close to something that he can complete. There's nothing normal about his vomiting.

Of course, it MAY help if he prepares himself. Most people in life know nothing about conditioning, and think that if they just keep pushing each week, it'll get better. In some cases, it's true. But if you are constantly pushing yourself beyond what your body can endure, you are not progressing.

Some riders are naturally gifted with good cardio endurance, some are not. He seems to be very poorly conditioned. Proper nutrition, rest, hydration, warm-up, and active strength/circuit training during the week, that will surely help in the long run. In the end though, it seems like that he is not ready for tough rides and should ease up to it.
 

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Have your friend slow down for a little bit before stopping completely. I had to stop completely in the middle of a run and thought I was going to blow chunks. I don't think it is natural for your body to be at full exertion and then come to a complete stop. Distance runners will jog and then walk at the end of a run.
 

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Re warm up times, i live in a very hilly area and find on both the Mtb and road bike that to be fully warmed up takes about 15 mins.

I define "fully warmed up" as when my breathing settles down to a steady rate which is maintained ( further big hills not withstanding) for the rest of the 2hr or so run.

I do have asthma, but my riding mates also find it takes 15 mins on our very local (starts at the end of our housing estate) Mtb route to get into the "groove".

Keeping going after a long hard climb, even at a slow rate, seems like the best idea. In warm weather, you tend to get very hot if you stop immediately at the top of a climb. Best to maintain a cooling flow of wind if possible.

Throwing up during or after every run will just discourage the person from going out again.
 

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stucol said:
Re warm up times, i live in a very hilly area and find on both the Mtb and road bike that to be fully warmed up takes about 15 mins.
I second that - I feel much better after 15-20 min of warmup. Big anerobic climbs before I get warmed up are hideous.
 
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