Mountain Bike Reviews Forum banner
1 - 20 of 20 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
71 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was wondering what type of safety gear I should get since I am new at this.

Today I hit a small course and thought if i went slow I wouldnt pop into the air on the ramp.....Wrong I went a good 3 feet in the air. I was scared as hell but I want to do it again.

I ride a fuji tahoe comp hardatil with full xt, bb7's and rock shox 2010 tora 318

Any sugggestions for bike mods or equipment would be greatly appreciated :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
71 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I have a fullface already but I have a torn rotater cuff I never got repaired and im not trying to add more injury

anyone use pressure suits? 661 evo pressure suit? do knee pads restrict movement? I currently have clip in pedals but I think i should get flats so i can bail easier. How about frames, what frames do you guys use/recommend?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
141 Posts
If you get knee pads that fit well then they shouldn't have a big impact on movement. As for the shoulder, I strain my shoulders often, but I haven't gotten to test a pressure suit. Personally I use a Rockgardn Flak jacket.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
427 Posts
knee pads and a good fullface helmet goes a long way.

if your good at unclipping, then its ok to stick with those, but do try flats also.

try and search the forum also, there are countless other threads with lots of really good advice for beginners.

DH/freeride is fun and as safe as other sports if you take the right precautions.

welcome :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
884 Posts
Protect your joints especially your knees. Full body armor is usually unnecessary at your level unless your really don't want to get scrapes. Just remember pads won't protect you from the worst of it (dislocations, fractures, etc). That's usually up to the "falling with style" skill set.

I think neck braces are worth it. Just so damned expensive.

90% of the time a fall is going to get you the worst at your palms/knees/elbows. Just tuck and roll and you'll (hopefully) never have to use the rest of it.

Going to the gym will also give you better protection on many levels! :thumbsup:
 

·
Underskilled
Joined
·
4,809 Posts
Although breaking from the norm, I think it is a good idea to wear lots of armour from early on.
Most people wait until they hurt themselves before deciding, hmm if only I was wearing pads I would not be in pain for the next months.

Even on my commute, if icy out I wear full face, elbow, hip and gloves.
Seems overkill but I lost my front wheel on some ice, skidded the whole way across the road and hit a car.

The main thought running through my mind " WWWEEEEEeeeee"

I hit a car at over 20 mph and really enjoyed it.


I am the only one of my biking friends not to have been in an air ambulance.

An absolute minimum when riding XC is a well fitting helmet (stressing the good fit), gloves and knee pads.

When riding DH get a DH helmet (You really should not be wearing a FF helmet without a neck brace as it stresses your neck and can paralyse you, this is why FF have been banned for kids and in ski racing). an open face DH helmet will still provide a lot of protectin. You will also need hip and elbow pads.


The simple rule of thumb is, if you can live without that body pads for a few weeks then armour is not necessary, otherwise it is.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
884 Posts
CaveGiant said:
Although breaking from the norm, I think it is a good idea to wear lots of armour from early on.
Most people wait until they hurt themselves before deciding, hmm if only I was wearing pads I would not be in pain for the next months.

Even on my commute, if icy out I wear full face, elbow, hip and gloves.
Seems overkill but I lost my front wheel on some ice, skidded the whole way across the road and hit a car.

The main thought running through my mind " WWWEEEEEeeeee"

I hit a car at over 20 mph and really enjoyed it.

I am the only one of my biking friends not to have been in an air ambulance.

An absolute minimum when riding XC is a well fitting helmet (stressing the good fit), gloves and knee pads.

When riding DH get a DH helmet (You really should not be wearing a FF helmet without a neck brace as it stresses your neck and can paralyse you, this is why FF have been banned for kids and in ski racing). an open face DH helmet will still provide a lot of protectin. You will also need hip and elbow pads.

The simple rule of thumb is, if you can live without that body pads for a few weeks then armour is not necessary, otherwise it is.
I wonder how much it costs to make a mid ranged neck brace? It really is ridiculous. Come to think of it so is $400+ helmets but at least they have cheaper alternatives. Curious as to why these have only caught on just recently also, in the MTB world at least.
 

·
Bullit Rider
Joined
·
328 Posts
Not meaning to hijack at all here, just some input :)

I'm nowhere near an experienced DH/FR rider yet. I'm working on it myself! I do however get some great speeds through the corners & rock gardens where I ride. Because of the rocks, I went with some Fox gear that happened to be on sale at Cambria bike (they are local to me in Santa Rosa, CA). Picked up the forearm/elbow guards, as well as knee/shin guards. Because of the rocks here, I wanted something with the hard outer plastic, which although I have not "needed" yet sure does give me a better sense of protection from the rocks. The elbow/forearm guards help with pushing through overgrown bushes as well!

Next though is some sort of upper body protection, like a pressure suit or flak jacket. I have hit a tree while cornering... my handlebar hooked the tree (redwood by the way), and turned me right into it at some speed. My right shoulder took the grunt of the hit. Thankfully, I didn't break my collarbone, but I sure was in pain for a while! Some sort of shoulder protection would have helped me on that one. The next week I went flying off my bike and landed on the same shoulder, skidding across the (non-rocky) trail. Thankfully I hopped back up and got back on the bike :)

Anyway, good luck on your decisions! Most important: have fun!
Clay
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
358 Posts
I know what it is like to get your first taste of FR/DH and immediately get hooked.

As someone who has spent more money than I'd like to admitt in the past year on bikes (going on my 4th new bike since last April) and bike related gear, I know exactly what you are getting yourself into. From my own experience, most people are going to try and steer you down what they think is the cheap road. Used bikes, lower end gear, swapping components from one bike to another to make things "work", etc. While I think these people have good intentions, this isn't always the best approach to the sport even for a beginner.

In retrospect, some of this advice is useful since I would not have figured out exactly what and how I like to ride without trying an XC hardtail, AM full-suspension bike, a DH tank, and now I'm finally on to building a light DH race bike. However, if I had known a little bit more about DH/FR before buying my first bike last year I would have definately skipped a few steps.

People are going to tell you that you don't know what kind of bike you'll want until you've ridden more. While this is partially true, you can narrow your focus pretty quick. Now that you've got a small taste of FR, watch some DH race videos, some FR videos, DJ videos, XC videos (is there such a thing) until you can point at something and say "I want to do THAT!" This is how I would approach your situation. I'm not saying that a particular bike will make you a racing superstar, but it will give you an idea on where you want to be with your riding and which type of bike you should build to get you there.

Any article I've ever read from a pro rider or coach, emphazies buying the best you can afford. I have never heard a professional advise buying one component over another because it is cheaper. Keep that in mind.

With that said, you need to know your budget and then buy the best you can afford. Although it is fun to debate which $100 component is better than another $100 component, in general price does indicate quality. Despite personal prefferences, Shimano XTR is comparable to Sram XO, a Fox 40 is comparable to a RS Boxxer WC, etc. If your budget does not match the bike you want/need to build my advice would be to save your money until it does. In the long run this is actually cheaper than swapping/upgrading parts as time goes by.

I would never skimp on protective gear. The obvious reason is you've only got one body, and you need to keep it healthy to ride. You are also unlikely to outgrow a good set of gear (depending on age) and it will last you a long time. Get the best helmet, knee/elbow pads, riding shorts, and shoes you can afford. Core protection is probably optional to start out, but never a bad idea. With gear, a lot will also depend on your size and body type to determine how it fits. My only point is, do not buy cheap protective gear just because it is cheap. There is a reason an entry level help costs $65 and the higher end helmets are $200+.

Sorry so long...I could probably go on and on. I hope this helps. If you have any specific questions on gear please PM me. I don't know it all, but would be happy to give you my opinion.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
71 Posts
Discussion Starter · #20 ·
charvey9 said:
I know what it is like to get your first taste of FR/DH and immediately get hooked.

As someone who has spent more money than I'd like to admitt in the past year on bikes (going on my 4th new bike since last April) and bike related gear, I know exactly what you are getting yourself into. From my own experience, most people are going to try and steer you down what they think is the cheap road. Used bikes, lower end gear, swapping components from one bike to another to make things "work", etc. While I think these people have good intentions, this isn't always the best approach to the sport even for a beginner.

In retrospect, some of this advice is useful since I would not have figured out exactly what and how I like to ride without trying an XC hardtail, AM full-suspension bike, a DH tank, and now I'm finally on to building a light DH race bike. However, if I had known a little bit more about DH/FR before buying my first bike last year I would have definately skipped a few steps.

People are going to tell you that you don't know what kind of bike you'll want until you've ridden more. While this is partially true, you can narrow your focus pretty quick. Now that you've got a small taste of FR, watch some DH race videos, some FR videos, DJ videos, XC videos (is there such a thing) until you can point at something and say "I want to do THAT!" This is how I would approach your situation. I'm not saying that a particular bike will make you a racing superstar, but it will give you an idea on where you want to be with your riding and which type of bike you should build to get you there.

Any article I've ever read from a pro rider or coach, emphazies buying the best you can afford. I have never heard a professional advise buying one component over another because it is cheaper. Keep that in mind.

With that said, you need to know your budget and then buy the best you can afford. Although it is fun to debate which $100 component is better than another $100 component, in general price does indicate quality. Despite personal prefferences, Shimano XTR is comparable to Sram XO, a Fox 40 is comparable to a RS Boxxer WC, etc. If your budget does not match the bike you want/need to build my advice would be to save your money until it does. In the long run this is actually cheaper than swapping/upgrading parts as time goes by.

I would never skimp on protective gear. The obvious reason is you've only got one body, and you need to keep it healthy to ride. You are also unlikely to outgrow a good set of gear (depending on age) and it will last you a long time. Get the best helmet, knee/elbow pads, riding shorts, and shoes you can afford. Core protection is probably optional to start out, but never a bad idea. With gear, a lot will also depend on your size and body type to determine how it fits. My only point is, do not buy cheap protective gear just because it is cheap. There is a reason an entry level help costs $65 and the higher end helmets are $200+.

Sorry so long...I could probably go on and on. I hope this helps. If you have any specific questions on gear please PM me. I don't know it all, but would be happy to give you my opinion.
Thanks Here is my current setup
2006 Fuji tahoe comp frame getting a jackal later this year
2010 RockShox tora 318 UTURN with poplock (set at 130mm travel)
alex rims :/ I'll be upgrading to some azonic outlaws next month
deore rear derailer (I'm not french so I'm not spelling it proper)
xt front derailer
fsa gravity light crank
shimano deore sti shifters
185/185 bb7's with flack jackets
I'm looking at getting the sram 2x10 "X9" drivetrain to replace shimano
and looking at elixer cr's to replace bb7's
shimano clip ins (looking at some grabby flats, any suggestions?)
 
1 - 20 of 20 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top