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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I bought myself a 2004 cannondale jekyll 600 lefty. I live about 15 minutes from Annadel so I plan to ride every inch of it. Anyway, I'm a total newb, so I'll have lots of questions. I notice in all the pics, you guys have camelbaks, and no water bottles right? It looks like most of you have the backpack type? Is that to carry more clothes? Is that for winter only? Do you use the bladder only type in summer ? How many use clipless pedals? Is it true that I have to bleed my air shocks yearly? Anyone have a how to on that? I don't really have anyone to ride with. Can I remove and re-use grips, or is it easier to cut them off and replace them? Thanks in advance.
 

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Lots of questions, ill answer as many as within my capabilities hehe.

About the camelbacks, unless you pick up a decent one they can turn out to be more of a hindrance than a utility. I just use a normal backpack and a waterbottle.
I carry a jacket and some food so a bigger pack is definitely the way to go in the winter.

Clipless pedals are really a matter of preference. I also recently started to mtb but was put off by the learning curve involved with clipless. Flat pedals and 5.10's were what I found to be the most all-round effective method. Although this pedal/shoe combination is strange for xc, it seems to work and allows me to have more confidence in the downhills.
If you plan on riding a lot of XC, clipless would probably be advisable.
Hope it helped a bit, not too sure about the rest of the q's.
-Sentiment
 

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Nature Rider, Not MTBer
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Hah! Lots of questions.

I wear a Camelbak on every ride, year-round. It has a bladder for water. It also has room for:
1) Spare tube
2) Tire levers
3) Patch kit
4) Tire pump
5) Multi-tool (hex keys, wrenches, chain tool, etc.)
6) Chain lube
7) Shock pump
8) Spare brake pads
9) Spare derailleur hanger
10) Powerlinks (to repair a chain)
11) Spare clothes I might need
12) Map for the area in which I'll be riding
etc., etc.

I sometimes bring a water bottle as well, if I want Cytomax or other non-water drink, or expect to need more fluids than will fit in my Camelbak bladder.

Most people I ride with use clipless pedals. Yet there are many highly skilled riders that ride flat pedals. There are advantages to each. A search of the forums should provide you with hours of amusing reading on this subject.

You bleed hydraulic disc brakes, not air shocks. How often you need to do that depends on your brakes. If they feel spongy, they probably should be bled. I have brakes that received heavy use for over three years and have never been bled. YMMV.

Air shocks do need maintenance from time to time. But you should be able to get a lot of use and learn a lot by talking to other riders before you need to do that.

Grips: It's possible to get them off. With my non-lock-on grips, I stick a screw driver between grip and bar. Pour a little rubbing alcohol in there. Rotate the screw driver all the way around handlebars, allowing alcohol to get everywhere. Grip slides off. Fairly easy and a lot cheaper than new grips. I use lock-on grips, which are held in place by clamps and are made to be easily removed by loosening the clamps.

You missed a good ride at Annadel today. http://forums.mtbr.com/showthread.php?t=475380
 

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Uncle
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Plim said:
Hah! Lots of questions.

Grips: ..stick a screw driver between grip and bar. Pour a little rubbing alcohol in there. Rotate the screw driver all the way around handlebars, allowing alcohol to get everywhere. Grip slides off. Fairly easy and a lot cheaper than new grips. I use lock-on grips, which are held in place by clamps and are made to be easily removed by loosening the clamps.
http://forums.mtbr.com/showthread.php?t=475380
I use a screwdriver or spoon handle if the bars are aluminum, & I if I'm not too concerned about the surface of the bar. With carbon bars or fancier alloy ones, consider using the male end of a thick/wide plastic zip tie -- dip in the alcohol first, and the little notches will retain some alcohol, and when you feed the ziptie end between the bar and the grip, that alcohol will reach the stuck parts and free the grips. Try twisting it off, and if it's still stuck, do it again but from a different angle. Works for me usually on the first try, and I no longer scratch up my bars -- even where the grips cover it up.:thumbsup:
 

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NedwannaB
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12,792 Posts
Hardcorish.....

Dan Theman said:
Looks like it was a good ride. I had to work. Might be able to go for a little while on thursday. Would you rate annadel as a fairly mild park? What are some more hardcore places around sonoma county?
....to name a few. Hardcore is relative to the individual rider:

-Skyline Park in Napa
-Oat Hill Mine Tr. in Calistoga
-Rockville in Fairfield
 

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Fat Skis/Fat Tires
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Plim said:
Grips: It's possible to get them off. With my non-lock-on grips, I stick a screw driver between grip and bar. Pour a little rubbing alcohol in there. Rotate the screw driver all the way around handlebars, allowing alcohol to get everywhere. Grip slides off. Fairly easy and a lot cheaper than new grips. I use lock-on grips, which are held in place by clamps and are made to be easily removed by loosening the clamps.
I've had great results with using a little dish soap/water solution to remove grips. All that's required is to get the inboard edge of the grip pried up slightly to allow a few drops to enter, and the detergent does the rest magically (yes, I checked: it is indeed magic). A little side to side English, and they're off. Be sure to clean the soap from the bars before reinstallation, unless you're prepared to ride your bike "with no handlebars." Alcohol works great as a lube in this application, as it disipates shortly after it's used.

+1 for lock-on grips; they're the bee's knees.
 

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(Ali)
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782 Posts
I use my Camelback as a backpack. I don't do bladder! Too much work to clean and keep clean. :) I carry as many water bottles as needed: 2 on the bike, more in the backpack.

I use clipless and can't imagine riding without them. Lots of other riders think the opposite.

Find out about group rides here and join them. But make sure that the group won't be too much above your skill and endurance levels.

If the grips have little holes at the ends; cover one with a finger and pump air through the other grip. Easy! :)

Ali
 

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Registered
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695 Posts
Yeah, what he said

I wear a Camelbak on every ride, year-round. It has a bladder for water. It also has room for:
1) Spare tube
2) Tire levers
3) Patch kit
4) Tire pump
5) Multi-tool (hex keys, wrenches, chain tool, etc.)
6) Chain lube
7) Shock pump
8) Spare brake pads
9) Spare derailleur hanger
10) Powerlinks (to repair a chain)
11) Spare clothes I might need
12) Map for the area in which I'll be riding
etc., etc.

This is a well prepared smart person here. I carry almost as much but one thing that I don't see here is a snake bite kit for real snakes not the tube meets the rim pinch type. I'm in the Mojave Desert 2 weeks a month and the snake population there is larger that the human population and since it's so small I just leave it in my pack for when I'm home in NORCAL. You will find there are many folks on this site with lots of great information about everything bike related. Have fun on your new bike.
 

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I like mtn biking, too
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3,267 Posts
I prefer carrying a water bladder in a backpack better than bottles because it's really easy to take swigs of water without having to stop, or ride with one hand while futzing with a bottle. Plus, it's nice to be able to carry food, tools for flats & breakdowns, first aid, extra layers, or room to store discarded layers, etc. It's all about what is comfortable, and works for you. That being said, if I needed to shed some weight for a time trial, or race or something, I'd go for a bottle. You could alternatively store tools & stuff in a bag under the seat.

I can ride just fine without the clipless pedals - it's nice to not have to worry about clipping/unclipping. There is research done on the actual pedaling technique of elite-level riders that shows that they don't actually "pull up" on the pedals - they just ease off on the pressure of the upward stroke. Also, the learning curve is, well, painful. But once you get used to them, that becomes second nature, from what I hear. Some people feel powerless without them.

Yeah, there are plenty of forums here with all the info you are asking about. Enjoy the trails!
 

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I like mtn biking, too
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3,267 Posts
Dan Theman said:
Would you rate annadel as a fairly mild park?
My limited impression of Anadel based on maybe 3 rides there, (on the same route), is that it is about medium compared to other places. It depends on which trails you are riding on - there is a good mix of easy, swoopy smooth singletrack and rocky technical stuff. But the rocky stuff in Anadel is not as intense as the rocky stuff at Rockville, or Oat Hill Mine.
 

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Nature Rider, Not MTBer
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2,695 Posts
lawndale said:
lock on gribs are the best thing ever

plim also carriess ice cream to from what i hear in his camel back
S'right! Little known fact that melted ice cream in the Camelbak bladder is nature's perfect hydration and energy beverage.

Annadel is not super-easy, and is not where I'd recommend a newb go. It's a bit too rocky for that. But it's not super-hard either.
 

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Uncle
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4,390 Posts
Cleaning your bladder?

pisket said:
I use my Camelback as a backpack. I don't do bladder! Too much work to clean and keep clean. :)
No joke here. They can be a real PITA to clean if you put special drinks or mixes in your bladder. In my case, aside from after purchase, I've never cleaned my camelbak bladder. I put only ebmud water in it, and usually use ~ 2/3 of the 100oz or so of water during a given ride. When I finish my ride, I leave the other 1/3 in there -- sometimes for a few weeks. Just before going for a ride, I'll dump the dregs, rinse it once with clean water, and then refill it. Tastes fine, and there's nothing floating or growing inside. 18months and going strong; perhaps my immune system is getting a rigorous workout? Sometime soon, I will fill it and add a few drops of bleach, leave it over night, and then rinse thoroughly, but only as a precaution.

As for the bottle, I might add one to the bike for flavored GoGoHydrolectroJuice (or whatever you kids are drinkin' these days), but as of yet, I've not done this.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Dan Theman said:
Looks like it was a good ride. I had to work. Might be able to go for a little while on thursday. Would you rate annadel as a fairly mild park? What are some more hardcore places around sonoma county?
went solo today. Lots of mud. I decided annadel is plenty hardcore for me for a while. I like rough go. Going to go again tuesday, depending on how much it rains tomorrow. I had a good time. Full suspension is nice. I bent the outside (high) gear on a rock, but I won't be using that one anyway. I only went for two hours. I should have stayed longer.
 
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