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steezy as 123
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23 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My bike is clinically obese and I'd like to do something about it. Ideally I'd like to shave off 8 pounds, but that is a hefty (haha) goal. I knew my bike was heavy, but this is pretty embarrassing. I ride XC with small jumps (1-2 ft) and hills, been riding for one season.

Current Upgrades in BOLD. Everything else is stock.

Where will I see the most weight loss? New tires? New wheels? New frame?

Please tell me there's hope...

2007 Specialized Hardrock Sport Disc

Fork: RST Gila POS
Brakes: (REAR)Shimano BR-M415 w/6" rotor brakes, Avid Speed Dial 7 Levers
(FRONT) Avid BB7, Avid Speed Dial 7 Levers
Shift Levers: Shimano Alivio
Front Derailleur: Shimano Acera
Rear Derailleur: Shimano Acera
Crankset: TruVativ ISO Flow 3.0, 22/32/42 teeth
Pedals: Crankbros Eggbeater 3
Bottom Bracket: TruVativ Power Spline, 113mm spindle
BB Shell Width: 68mm
Rear Cogs: 8-speed, 11 - 32 teeth
Chain: Shimano CN-HG50
Seatpost: Alloy micro adjust, 30.9mm diameter
Saddle: Specialized Body Geometry ATB
Handlebar: Alloy riser
Handlebar Stem: Specialized

Wheels
Hubs: Front: Shimano HB-M65L Centerlock disc, Rear: Shimano FH-M65L Centerlock
Rims: Specialized/Alex HRD 26, 36-hole
Tires: 26 x 2.10" Specialized Resolution
 

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R.I.P. DogFriend
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6,891 Posts
First of all, you need to realize that this could get ugly, as it is likely the cumulative weight of all the components along with the frame. Second, it will make some difference, but it won't suddenly make you king of the hill if you're not damn close to that already. Third, this could be a spendy, slippery slope on which for you to read.

How far will you go to make a silk purse from a relative sow's ear? What often happens is that you will literally replace everything on the bike except the frame, and maybe the front derailleur. Seen it happen many, many times.

Eight pounds is radical surgery. Do you love this frame so much that you are willing to spend two or three times what you paid for the bike to drop eight pounds from it? How much budget are you willing to committ to this project?

I honestly don't see how you could lose that much without spending at least $1,000 and that would take some real bargain hunting.

The most weight loss will occur in a new wheel set, and a new fork. ( air fork ).
True in most cases, and rotating weight is a great thing to ga after, but there could be some other 'boat anchor' type parts that are relatively cheap to replace first. Some 'low hanging fruit' so to speak.

You already have 'legbeaters'. . . . . . I mean eggbeater pedals and those are pretty light, but that is the first thing I would check. No low hanging fruit there, bummer.

The stem and seatpost are the next things I would check. Then, the handlebar.

As for the fork, your stock fork is around 5.5lbs or so. You could drop 1.5lbs to a little over 2lbs off that for around $300 to $400 (or possibly more coin if you're sloppy about shopping). Right now, you can get some pretty good deals on a Manitou R7 and those forks weigh well under 4lbs.

My guess is that your wheels weigh around 2200 to 2400g. It will likely cost you at least $400 to get that down into the sub-1700g range (not including skewers).

So, let's be optimistic and say you took 2 pounds off the fork, and 1.5lbs from the wheels, and by the time you pay shipping (cuz the LBS isn't going to be cheaper in this journey), you're likely going to be around at least $800 and you've taken 3.5lbs off the bike :eek:

Next thing would be the tires. The Specialized Resolution Sport with wire beads weigh 735g each. If you went with a Specialized 26" x 2.2" LK Control (reasonable sidewall strength, and not outrageously expensive - about $45 to $50 each), they are supposedly around 515g each, so you could shed close to another pound for another $100.

So, we're now up around $900 +/- and we've taken 4.5lbs off the bike. Oh yeah, that fancy wheelset? A large part of the weight savings is going to come from no longer having a steel freehub body and now having an aluminum freehub body. And, you have a cassette that has individual cogs. Some of that type have pins keeping them somewhat aligned together, but you will still need to get a cassette with an aluminum carrier that holds most of the cogs, and that will be another $75 for aShimano XT or a SRAM 990 (the Shimano SLX ony holds the first three cogs, and I would spend the extra for the XT or SRAM 990).

Now, you might be a world class shopper and find an outrageous deal here and there, but that is going to take even more time and patience than it will to get the deals I am already figuring on here, and this is where things start to make the cash register really sing. Are you ready to keep going?
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BTW: You can get one of these that supposedly weighs 21.1lbs (w/o pedals) for $1499:

http://www.bikesdirect.com/products/motobecane/fly_9357_x.htm
 

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1/2 fast or 1/2 assed?
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641 Posts
^^^What he said. Jeffj, you go above and beyond the call of duty. :D

My thoughts on this- Pulling that extra weight will only help you while exercising. The HardRock is designed as an entry level trailbike. XC bikes are designed for a more experienced rider.

Upgradeitis is a common disease that plagues us as men. We love all those numbers and carbon fiber and shiny metal ugh, ugh, UGH! I have already picked out all sorts of upgrades myself (but havent bought them yet) and am waiting for those parts to break so I can justify (Yes, Im married) spending lots and lots of money on them. Good luck and do post which items you choose.
 

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Class Clown
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3,403 Posts
I've upgraded most of my rockhopper, and tried to save weight where I can but kept the upgrades mid-range. I would upgrade as you see fit but don't go crazy on that frame. When I want an ultralight bike I'll spend the $ on a real nice frame.
 

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Registered
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431 Posts
I agree with the above posts. Your bike is what it is. When you can afford it buy another bike if you want, until then rock your current bike and be stronger for it. My bike weighs around the same and it's a very nice and expensive bike but the frame size and style make it on the heavy side, it's my only bike and is used for lots of XC riding. Spend your money on a skills camp, you'll get way more benefit for your $$.
 

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Fat-tired Roadie
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18,453 Posts
OP - I have the '07 Hardrock Comp. I've actually done a lot of the upgrades jeffj mentions, although I haven't been trying to weight weenie it. I'm trying to be disciplined about that - if I'm going to get into that, I'd rather cannibalize it building up a race frame, and maybe borrow a food scale and bust out a spreadsheet while I'm at it, so I can be intelligent about it. But, I'm at 152 lb, and I think my best racing weight is at 145 - a little silly to worry about the bike until I hit that weight, and even then, maybe not until I move up another class. I have heavy-ass pedals, a heavy-ass stem and a heavy-ass seat post. That's all okay, though, they do the jobs I want them to, and I doubt that I'd see a swing of more than a pound if I replaced them.

Switching from a RST Gila to a Manitou R7 made a shocking amount of difference. People trash-talk it for its flexiness, but it's a lot stiffer than the Gila. And I did notice the weight loss from the front end - it became a lot easier to pop up the front wheel.

The Shimano crankset on mine was a real boat anchor. Since yours is a model down, I'd speculate that it's worse. Cranks can be a relatively expensive upgrade, though, especially if you want a weight weenie model. I swapped for an SLX for a different reason, and it's a lot lighter. I don't know that I notice a difference there, though, and if I had to pick a place not to care, it would be around the bottom bracket.

I did replace the handlebars, the weight change was pretty big, and I can't say I noticed it in riding. I did notice the change I was trying for, though. :D

The Specialized Resolution, at least in the cheapo version on a Hardrock, is a POS. Replace the tires because they suck, take weight loss as a side benefit. Replacing the wheels hasn't made as big a difference, but I replaced the front wheel for a different reason a couple years ago, and mine were 32-hole models, not 36-hole models. So, it could be a bigger change for you.

Late last season I was doing a really masochistic fire road climb on the back side of one of my favorite mountains and some dude in gym shorts, on a mostly stock Hardrock Sport (he'd put on a really fat rear tire and a gel saddle cover, but I think those were the only tweaks) came huffing, puffing and grunting past me. I caught up to him when he took a break at the top and found out he was a mountaineering guide, so I felt better about that. Also that his big back pack just contained a helmet, so lots of volume and no weight. I'm used to being the annoying guy on the inexpensive bike in those situations, so it was a little startling to have someone else climb faster than me on an even cheaper setup. Leave the embarrassment about your bike's weight to the dudes you pass. ;)
 

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T.W.O
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1,730 Posts
I agree with what Andrew is saying. And andrew, he killed you on a fire road climb I wouldn't worry too much about it. People like that really make laugh; blazing on flat two track like wtfbbqsauce?
 

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Fat-tired Roadie
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18,453 Posts
Actually, one of the funnier parts of that story is that I was on my way to the singletrack descent that makes that my favorite place to ride. I first saw the guy when he was on the way down the doubletrack. I assumed he was lost - wtf would someone ride down that doubletrack when another several minutes up, there's some beautiful mountain biking to be done!? Often, I get mine back when the miles start to add up anyway. :)
 

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R.I.P. DogFriend
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6,891 Posts
wheels and tires will make the biggest difference. 36 is a lot of spokes for an XC wheel.
A friend of my sons had the 36 spoke wheels on one of those bikes (and the wonderful, no make that 'woeful' Gila too). I think the build quality could be suspect on those. In spite of weighing under 150lbs, he still managed to mangle the front wheel hitting a pothole in the street. I happened to have an old 36h Tioga rim in the garage I used to rebuild the for him and it's still going strong a few years later.

I'd at least get them checked for even spoke tension.
 

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R.I.P. DogFriend
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6,891 Posts
I took over 5lbs off my bike for under $500

new epicon fork
new lx crankset
used mavic crossmax sl
tubeless
Regardless of exactly how it's divided up, you did very well. The new LX crankset can be had for $89 plus shipping. I see new Epicon forks for about $200+ including shipping (or more), but maybe you found one for a little less. That doesn't leave much for CrossMax SL wheels and tubeless. I would have to imagine you got a VERY good price on that wheelset.

Now that most of the low hanging fruit has been plucked for $100 per pound, do you think you could remove another 3lbs from your bike for less than $500? Maybe, but you're still going to be up there in the $800-$1,000 range and you got a steal of a price on the CrossMax SL wheelset.
 

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Registered
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254 Posts
Best to scan for deals on CL.

Some guy had a GT Avalanche frame with rigid fork..22 lbs for $200. Just missed it.

Someone else had a Cannondale F1000 (yellow, fairly recent)..24 lbs for $200. Just missed it.

Someone had a 2006 Cannondale F600 for $549 (disk brakes, no offroad use..only city, bought new for $1200). Looks brand-new. weight=? See attached image.

Original owner - bought brand new for $1200
Mint condition - very lightly used as urban commuter - never ridden offroad
A real high quality machine - frame handmade in USA
This bike looks Brand new put an extra couple hindred in extras new tires, New grips, New Pedals, New tires, Just had it tuned up!
I just got a Cannondale F600 ('95, Headshock front fork..lockout doesn't work) with everything except brake-levers, ~26-26 lbs (with heavy 20oz platform pedals)..$130. LX hubs, LX cantilevers, LX crank, LX & XT front/rear derailleurs. Wheelset ~4.25 lbs (1912g) I'm starting a build, & we'll see how low I can go.
 

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Registered
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744 Posts
Now that most of the low hanging fruit has been plucked for $100 per pound, do you think you could remove another 3lbs from your bike for less than $500? Maybe, but you're still going to be up there in the $800-$1,000 range and you got a steal of a price on the CrossMax SL wheelset.
I've found a lot of nice used wheel sets on ebay but I guess it just takes patience. I do agree past the first 4-5lbs it gets really hard. Unless you want to cheat and do something like a 1x9 then you can get rid of quite a bit of weight for free.
 

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SSOD
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826 Posts
My brother had this same bike, XL frame, and it was a boat anchor. I got it down to 25 lbs for under 500 bucks for his birthday last year.

Bought new set of LX cranks for under 100 from Jensonusa
Bought used set of Mavic Crossrides with tires for 100 on CL
Bought new set of Elixir 5's for 200
Bought new closeout Easton EA70 bars stem seatpost under 60
Bought a surly singlanator and spacer kit 40

Took off all the crap components, and replaced them while converting to single speed. Not very light for a ss but with 200-250 for a decent used fork on CL probably could get it down another pound or pound and half and then it's pretty respectable. One gear is all you really need anyway.
 

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Picture Unrelated
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5,123 Posts
I didn't realize that there was something wrong with a 33lb bike, should I be worried about mine?

You'll be spending money hand over fist to drop weight on that bike. It's fine if you really like it but you've reached a point where it would be time to consider picking up a complete bike on the new or used market that might serve your light weight fantasies better. A 25lb Hardrock is a bold goal and you have to remember that old bike adage from Keith Bontrager "Strong. Light. Cheap. Pick Two.". You will be sacrificing strength for your jumps if you go cheap and light, if you want strong and light well it's not going to be cheap.

I thought jeffj made the point quite well, but if you're insistent on upgrades then I'll throw out a couple suggestions also. Wheels probably won't make the greatest difference in scale weight but they will probably add a difference in the weight you feel while you ride the bike. Tires are cheap and easy to upgrade to something lighter than those wire beads. That fork can be expensive to replace but you can loose some serious weight up there too.

Things I wouldn't bother upgrading for weight are items like the shifters and derailleurs. Upgrade those when they break. Shopping is going to be your friend so good luck!
 

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Premium Member
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6,709 Posts
Have a few bikes. As well laid out by jeff and others, it'd cost you more than twice what a good used bike would cost. Plus it's good to have more than 1 set up. I for speed with clipless, 1 for tecnical with platform. 1 for the corner store, 1 for a freind, 1 for the road, xc, dh, ect.
Any decent bike that you like, and fits you well, is worth maintaining so save the upgrades for when something breaks.
Ride upgrades, don't buy upgrades.
BTW, Whether I ride my lighter or heavier bikes, I have just as much fun.
 
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