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I confess to not reading this entire thread but I read enough of it to come to the conclusion that there are a lot of confused riders out there.

While anyone can replace a 29” rear wheel with a 27.5” rear wheel and call it a mullet, it seems many participants to this thread don’t understand that an actual mullet bike is designed as such. Simply replacing a larger wheel with a smaller one on a bike that wasn’t designed around the smaller wheel will change geometry in unintended ways.

A proper mullet bike is designed as such. Period.

To illustrate this argument, consider a rider who buys a 29er — that’s 29” wheels front and rear. Then they buy a second set of wheels, this time 27.5” F&R. The rider installs the smaller wheels to see if s/he likes 27.5” wheels better than 29” wheels and ends the ride claiming 27.5” wheels are a bad design because they cause too many pedal strikes.

No they don’t. Think about it.

We can’t just install a smaller rear wheel and claim we do or don’t like a genuine mullet bike. We F up the manufacturer’s geometry if we do that. Want to actually try a mullet bike? Then buy a frame designed for a small rear wheel and a larger front wheel. This is the only way to maintain intended geometry.

Tangential story (TLDRers skip this paragraph): I ride 29” wheels. I‘ve had riders ask me, “Doesn’t a 29” frame make the bottom bracket too high?” Seems there are a lot of people out there who don’t understand that a frame designer can place the bottom bracket anywhere s/he wants it regardless of wheel size. Why mention this? Because the same rules apply to a bike with diverse size wheels — it’s gotta be designed for diverse wheel sizes — front & rear. And it can be designed that way. But we can’t just mix or match wheels in a frame not specifically designed for different size wheels simply because we we want to experiment with an oddball wheel. Not and maintain the manufacturer’s intended handling, anyway.

As for why mullet bikes keep coming around, that’s because it’s a viable concept. Meanwhile many comments within this thread illustrate the bike buying public’s lack of understanding as to why the concept is viable. If it’s not accepted by the public, it won’t fly — regardless how awesome it actually is.
=sParty
 

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OOOOOOOh Gee Are Eee
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To illustrate this argument, consider a rider who buys a 29er — that’s 29” wheels front and rear. Then they buy a second set of wheels, this time 27.5” F&R. The rider installs the smaller wheels to see if s/he likes 27.5” wheels better than 29” wheels and ends the ride claiming 27.5” wheels are a bad design because they cause too many pedal strikes.
Yeah, I was thinking about doing this with my Honzo but realized quickly it would lower the BB and "Fixing" that would require either welding skills or some kind of jiggery which I don't understand.

I think you might be able to get a 27.5 bike and with the correct fork put a 29" wheel up front, but even that is suspect.

As for why mullet bikes keep coming around, that’s because it’s a viable concept. Meanwhile many comments within this thread illustrate the bike buying public’s lack of understanding as to why the concept is viable. If it’s not accepted by the public, it won’t fly — regardless how awesome it actually is.
I think the idea is coming around. Pros and big bike brands adopting it helps a lot.

I've never cared a whole lot about whether something is accepted by the public or not. If it works well and I can get parts for it, I'll ride it. While mullet bikes geometry might be less common, the wheels and tires are all commonly available.
 

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2021 Hightower CC
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I confess to not reading this entire thread but I read enough of it to come to the conclusion that there are a lot of confused riders out there.

While anyone can replace a 29” rear wheel with a 27.5” rear wheel and call it a mullet, it seems many participants to this thread don’t understand that an actual mullet bike is designed as such. Simply replacing a larger wheel with a smaller one on a bike that wasn’t designed around the smaller wheel will change geometry in unintended ways.

A proper mullet bike is designed as such. Period.

To illustrate this argument, consider a rider who buys a 29er — that’s 29” wheels front and rear. Then they buy a second set of wheels, this time 27.5” F&R. The rider installs the smaller wheels to see if s/he likes 27.5” wheels better than 29” wheels and ends the ride claiming 27.5” wheels are a bad design because they cause too many pedal strikes.

No they don’t. Think about it.

We can’t just install a smaller rear wheel and claim we do or don’t like a genuine mullet bike. We F up the manufacturer’s geometry if we do that. Want to actually try a mullet bike? Then buy a frame designed for a small rear wheel and a larger front wheel. This is the only way to maintain intended geometry.

Tangential story (TLDRers skip this paragraph): I ride 29” wheels. I‘ve had riders ask me, “Doesn’t a 29” frame make the bottom bracket too high?” Seems there are a lot of people out there who don’t understand that a frame designer can place the bottom bracket anywhere s/he wants it regardless of wheel size. Why mention this? Because the same rules apply to a bike with diverse size wheels — it’s gotta be designed for diverse wheel sizes — front & rear. And it can be designed that way. But we can’t just mix or match wheels in a frame not specifically designed for different size wheels simply because we we want to experiment with an oddball wheel. Not and maintain the manufacturer’s intended handling, anyway.

As for why mullet bikes keep coming around, that’s because it’s a viable concept. Meanwhile many comments within this thread illustrate the bike buying public’s lack of understanding as to why the concept is viable. If it’s not accepted by the public, it won’t fly — regardless how awesome it actually is.
=sParty
Or you can just not even give a fly about what the manufacturer intended and change elements of the bike that matter to you most. The Hightower V2 has been sold with two different shock stroke lengths and is approved for a range of fork lengths and wheel sizes. If you ride a lot of steep flow trail and jump lines then maybe a slack front end and rear tire clearance are way more important than pedal strikes. I haven’t had a motorcycle with stock geometry in over 40 years.

It is your bike. Make it what you want.
 

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People don't still ask that question I hope. 29" wheels have been around awhile now.
I don’t recall when the last time was but personally I can’t believe the question was ever asked.
It seems people either understand frame design or they don’t.
=sParty
 

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Out spokin'
In cog? Neato!
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Or you can just not even give a fly about what the manufacturer intended and change elements of the bike that matter to you most. The Hightower V2 has been sold with two different shock stroke lengths and is approved for a range of fork lengths and wheel sizes. If you ride a lot of steep flow trail and jump lines then maybe a slack front end and rear tire clearance are way more important than pedal strikes. I haven’t had a motorcycle with stock geometry in over 40 years.

It is your bike. Make it what you want.
Agreed. I do likewise. All I’m suggesting is that people know what they’re doing before they start modifying.
=sParty
 

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I was watching a Santa Cruz Bronson review video and heard them reference the new mullet bike as their MX design. That makes sense to me as most modern dirt bikes have a 21" front wheel and either a 18 or 19" in the rear. There has to be something to that. I have never ridden a mullet but I have had the haircut and it was a good time. I hope I get a chance to demo one.
 

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The new Insurgent can run both a 27.5 and 29 on the front. You just need a 10mm longer 27.5 fork to run the 27.5 wheel...which still has a lower front end than running a 29r fork and 29r wheel.
 

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My 27.5 bike already came with mulleted suspension (160 f/ 140 r). I think my summer project will be to find a cheap, used 29 140 fork and 29 wheel.

My theory is changing from a 160 fork 27.5 wheel to a 140 fork 29 wheel will preserve the original geometry.
 

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My 27.5 bike already came with mulleted suspension (160 f/ 140 r). I think my summer project will be to find a cheap, used 29 140 fork and 29 wheel.

My theory is changing from a 160 fork 27.5 wheel to a 140 fork 29 wheel will preserve the original geometry.
I was actually thinking about just getting new fork lowers. I already have the shorter air spring.
 
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