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I like travel; the more the better, but I'm building a race hardtail and don't want to end up regretting the extra 40mm over the original ~63mm SID XC. Geometry changes don't worry me and I'm thinking about a Scareb 100. Do you really need SPV and/or a lockout with 100mm or would an 80mm fork be better? (Hardly ever lock out my Fox on the dualie...).
 

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My experience...

Haggis said:
I like travel; the more the better, but I'm building a race hardtail and don't want to end up regretting the extra 40mm over the original ~63mm SID XC. Geometry changes don't worry me and I'm thinking about a Scareb 100. Do you really need SPV and/or a lockout with 100mm or would an 80mm fork be better? (Hardly ever lock out my Fox on the dualie...).
Based on my own experience, consider all the factors separately. In other words:

--Geometry is one issue. If 100 will throw your bike off, SPV or not is irrelevant.

--Bob is another issue. If you find it bugs you out of the saddle with whatever travel you have now, it will still bug you with more travel. It won't likely be worse if you have the sag dialed in right.

I don't notice a lot more bob going from my old 80 to my current 100, but I do notice a plusher ride with the extra travel.

Maybe your frame was designed for 63/80 and going to 100 will be OK. If it was specifically designed for 63, the change might be a bit radical.

Hope this helps.

-Chris
http://www.enduroforkseals.com/
 

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Thanks Chris...

Chris2fur said:
I don't notice a lot more bob going from my old 80 to my current 100, but I do notice a plusher ride with the extra travel.

Maybe your frame was designed for 63/80 and going to 100 will be OK. If it was specifically designed for 63, the change might be a bit radical.

http://www.enduroforkseals.com/
It's a Homegrown Factory frame. I vaguely recall you had one of these frames?

I'm going to shorten the stem from 130mm to 110mm which will help compensate for the slower steering due to longer fork...
As far as bob goes; it's just been along time since i rode a hardtail in anger and 100mm forks were not de rigeur back then.
 

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bob is dependant on low-speed compression. It is a tradeoff though, the forks that "bob" are the plushest forks that respond the best, especially to lower-speed stuff. A fork with more compression damping, will not be as responsive and not feel as plush, but it will not bob as much either.

This "compression damping" can come in several forms, SPV, low-speed compression adjustment (currently this is not available on most forks), stiction from bushings that are too tight, stiction from seals on air-forks, elastomers, etc. This "resistance to movement" is what causes them to not bob as much, and racers usually pump their air-forks up to some pretty insane pressures and the ride is not very "compliant", but they will obviously bob even less.

It really depends on your goals here, an air-marzocchi probably wont be bad, a coil marzocchi (like the marathon S or Z1FR) will have more bobbing. Manitou forks usually don't bob very much because they do not have as good an oil-bath as marzocchis and hence, they are somewhat more "sticky", some of the TPC+ forks have adjustable shim stacks as well that would allow you to tune the low-speed damping. The Rockshox SIDs will not bob again because they are also air forks with more "stiction", also the more progressive nature of air-forks helps a tiny bit to reduce bobbing as well (in addition to the stiction). If you want the hands-down best ride and best performing suspension, you are going to want the coil marzocchi.

There is no product currently that allows you to adjust the low-speed compression damping with the "turn of a knob". Rockshox might have this with "motion control", although it seems they are using the "hydracoil" damping system with this fork and if that is the case, it may not be a great performer compared to better damping systems. The product that lets you adjust the low-speed compression "on the fly" without affecting any other adjustments or traits is the "holy grail" IMO. Then you can ride on level ground or climb with more low speed compression and reduce bobbing, and then "turn it off" for the best suspension performance going downhill or whatever.
 

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Hey, same frame!

Haggis said:
It's a Homegrown Factory frame. I vaguely recall you had one of these frames?

I'm going to shorten the stem from 130mm to 110mm which will help compensate for the slower steering due to longer fork...
As far as bob goes; it's just been along time since i rode a hardtail in anger and 100mm forks were not de rigeur back then.
Yeah, I was referring to my '01 Homegrown Pro frame. If yours is the same year, it's the exact same frame except you have black anodizing and I've got Bass-Boat Blue Mini-Metallic powder coat (whew!). I was leery about using a 100mm fork because I tried out a customer's Marathon (105mm) once and found it too tall in front. The Skareb (100mm) has a shorter axel-to-crown height and I quite like it.

I'm not sure about the stem change. That may change your weight distribution. I left mine alone. Maybe you should try it first and save the money if you decide your current stem is OK.

-Chris
 

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Jm., Have you tried on '04 Manitou?

Jm. said:
Manitou forks usually don't bob very much because they do not have as good an oil-bath as marzocchis and hence, they are somewhat more "sticky", some of the TPC+ forks have adjustable shim stacks as well that would allow you to tune the low-speed damping.
Good info in your post, but I beg to differ on the section in quotes here. My Skareb Super is not "sticky" at all. It's very smooth. In fact, my wife's X-Fly 80 could only hope to be as smooth and stiction free--that's even after putting a coil spring in one leg.

-Chris
http://www.enduroforkseals.com/
 

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Fox

Jm said:
There is no product currently that allows you to adjust the low-speed compression damping with the "turn of a knob". Rockshox might have this with "motion control", although it seems they are using the "hydracoil" damping system with this fork and if that is the case, it may not be a great performer compared to better damping systems. The product that lets you adjust the low-speed compression "on the fly" without affecting any other adjustments or traits is the "holy grail" IMO. Then you can ride on level ground or climb with more low speed compression and reduce bobbing, and then "turn it off" for the best suspension performance going downhill or whatever
The Fox F***X series allows anit-bob threashold adjustment, with the inertia valve breakaway threashhold adjustment on the bottom of the leg. The rest of the travel is smooth and plush.
 

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Chris2fur said:
Good info in your post, but I beg to differ on the section in quotes here. My Skareb Super is not "sticky" at all. It's very smooth. In fact, my wife's X-Fly 80 could only hope to be as smooth and stiction free--that's even after putting a coil spring in one leg.

-Chris
You misunderstand, the "stiction" i am referring to is very very subtle, it doesn't make the fork ride like crap or anything necessarily...still, there is still a difference between coil marzocchis and coil manitous. The low-speed compression is the issue/culprit here.
 
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