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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
"The High Plains Trail survey, which took place over a month-long period in May and June of 2007, found that mountain bikers made up 85 percent of the trail's visitors, followed by runners, who made up 9 percent of visitors, and hikers, who made up 5 percent of visitors.

Bikers were the most likely to follow the rules - 99 percent of them stayed on the trail, according to the study. Hikers weren't as good at following the rules - 36 percent strayed beyond the trail. And most - 62 percent - of the 13 visiting parties with dogs in tow didn't follow the on-trail rules, the study found."

http://www.dailycamera.com/news/2008/jun/16/staying-on-the-trail-study-most-open-space-obey/
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Although I'm perfectly happy sharing a multi-use trail and have no real beef with hikers, horse riders or any other trail users I gotta admit, I like the fact that we're (for once) the "good guys". :eekster: :D
 

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jugdish said:
Although I'm perfectly happy sharing a multi-use trail and have no real beef with hikers, horse riders or any other trail users I gotta admit, I like the fact that we're (for once) the "good guys". :eekster: :D
I second that.
 

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I am curious to know if it was a survey or some one on watch looking at behavior. Like Nomit said, mtb bikers ARE actually more likely to lie--as well as stay on the trail. The reason? They are more aware in general and at the bottom of the chain in the access issue. All the advocacy groups communicate about this and stress staying on the trail in the bike community. I think there is an underlying tension for bikers to remain on the trail both since it's beaten into our heads and for our sense of accomplishment in the no-dabbing ideal of mountain biking.

I believe in the hiking community, there is no such awareness and in fact, hikers find it completely acceptable to jaunt off the trail. It goes way back to the sense of being able to approach plants and things that you see along a hike.

But If everyone always stood on the trail, you would never get around anyone (hikers, bikers, whoever) on the lunch breaks.

Horse riders regularly ride off trail. In fact, I have seen them free range the open space all the time. Ironically, I welcome it since it lets me avoid conflict and horsepoo.

This whole on or off trail issue is a gray area that seems to get a lot of needless energy spent.

As long as people are respecting the trails; not riding off trails in desert crypto, skidding off the trail out of control (leaving a gouge), riding around big puddles in the early spring (forming a new trail), cutting switchbacks, or other blatant acts of disregard, I'm ok with a little grass under the tread or feet once in a while.
 

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lidarman said:
This whole on or off trail issue is a gray area that seems to get a lot of needless energy spent.

As long as people are respecting the trails; not riding off trails in desert crypto, skidding off the trail out of control (leaving a gouge), riding around big puddles in the early spring (forming a new trail), cutting switchbacks, or other blatant acts of disregard, I'm ok with a little grass under the tread or feet once in a while.
High Plains Trail was surveyed (whatever that means, I'm not 100% sure, but pretty sure it was observed as opposed to polled) becasue it's in a Habitat Conservation Area. As I understand it, HCA's are there primarily to preserve the area as opposed to being an area that's more available for recreation.

This particular information indicates that we mountainbikers follow the rules of the trail more than other users. It should help us in the future.
 
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