Mountain Bike Reviews Forum banner
1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am an intermediate MT biker, crossed over from BMX, who never really thinks about safety. It wasn't until I was blasting down a boulder filled riverbed, by myself, on a local trail that I thought maybe I should.

From that I have been working on a design project focused less on prevention, and more on after-the-fact, such as communication to receive help, or better information to stabilize and injured biker.

I typically ride with my helmet, camel-bak, and cell phone (which usually doesn't have service), and that's about it. I am interested to hear others thoughts on what you typically take with you and how you think you would get out of a situation where you needed medical assistance (actual stories if you have any).

Thanks for your input!

(Keep the discussion here, but a few questions to help me organize: https://survey.vt.edu/survey/entry.jsp?id=1280103995204)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,751 Posts
Besides the obvious helmet (and a phone with a signal), I take a little first aid kit with a bandage/sling, foil blanket, gauze/tape and some antiseptic spray in it, It's not huge but enough to keep someone warm and stop them bleeding in an emergency. That and some tubes, puncture kit, mech hanger and some power links.

Only needed the first aid kit once, sliced my calf open good and proper with a chain ring. Taped it up and rode home, then drove to hospital. Never given much consideration to getting knocked out.
 

·
Sheffield,South Yorkshire
Joined
·
425 Posts
As Fix the spade but I always carry a whistle and small LED light.Mobile phone signals in the Hills in the UK(as elsewhere) are sporadic at best so if the worse happens I have the whistle in daylight(six short blasts pause then repeat every minute in the UK)and the whistle/LED if it gets dark.
I've only ever had to call Mountain Rescue once in over 30 years of doing out door stuff and that was last year for an elderly ill equipt couple.The lady had fallen and badly cut her head and was dis-orientated due to this and the lack of water on an untypically hot English summers day.Luckily as we weren't too far from civilisation(but far enough to need the helicopter)I had a phone signal.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the feedback!

Where do you all typically store your extra equipment and first aid supplies? In a pack, on the bike,...? What about water? And where did you get most of your first aid information (internet, classes,...)?
ibbo said:
The lady had fallen and badly cut her head and was dis-orientated due to this and the lack of water on an untypically hot English summers day.
ibbo, was the elderly lady wearing a helmet? How crowded was the trail?

Again, thanks for the feedback!
(survey still open to help me organize: https://survey.vt.edu/survey/entry.jsp?id=1280103995204)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,083 Posts
The Bail out plan.....

Need to have a Bail out plan for every ride....

Sometimes it is has simple has, remain unconcious until somebody comes along.
 

·
It's about showing up.
Joined
·
12,738 Posts
Not riding alone helps.

I know that can cramp one's stye but there it is. Pride cometh before a fall, and all that. I don't think that falls into the "prevention" category as no phone, no consciousness, leaves you in a real mess after the event.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
812 Posts
A couple of weeks ago I found somebody disoriented after a crash, he was hurt and I had to call the paramedics. He did not have ID or a cell phone. His excuse after he came around? He lived half a mile from the trail...
 

·
Sheffield,South Yorkshire
Joined
·
425 Posts
sallf said:
Thanks for the feedback!

Where do you all typically store your extra equipment and first aid supplies? In a pack, on the bike,...? What about water? And where did you get most of your first aid information (internet, classes,...)?

ibbo, was the elderly lady wearing a helmet? How crowded was the trail?

Again, thanks for the feedback!
(survey still open to help me organize: https://survey.vt.edu/survey/entry.jsp?id=1280103995204)
The lady in question was a walker/hiker.They'd set out on what they thought was a pleasant stroll without maps or knowledge of the terrain.Also instead of going back down the hill to where there were more people they carried on up as they thought it would be the quicker route:rolleyes:
RE equipment.Camelbak hydration pack and all tools/spares/first aid kit etc stored in the compartments of the pack.
 

·
29 and Single
Joined
·
160 Posts
There are lots of preventative measures that can be taken that will only benefit you after the fact. Carrying a first aid kit is a preventative measure that does nothing to help you before an accident. Same with a cell phone. And wearing a helmet should be a constant. I've never had a crash where I was expecting it. And those unexpected crashes were the ones where it took me a few minutes to clear the cobwebs.

One doesn't have to carry an entire Emergency Department stock room out into the woods either. A few large bandages and gauze rolls can fix most of the problems one will encounter after a crash. The most important things are the prevention measures.

1. Let someone know where you are going and around when you should be back
2. Carry some form of ID. Black and White photocopy of an Operators License or one of the commercial ID bands, Like RoadID. www.roadid.com Write pertinent information down as well. Allergies, medications, contact numbers for family, etc...
3. Know the trail. Look it up online or on a map. Have a general idea of what the trail runs near (neighborhoods, parks, railroad tracks, etc...) and if there are any places to get off other than the beginning or end. Then pay attention to where you are on the trail and see what you can notice in case you ever have to use these things.
4. Know what trail you are on. I have had people tell me about riding trail A and upon their description realized they were riding trail B. It does you no good to call EMS and not be able to tell them where you are.
5. Cell Phone. Carry one that works. Put it in a plastic bag and carry it in a way that it will be more difficult to destroy in a crash. Needing it and it being soaked or broken doesn't help. If you are in an area with no cell service: see #1.
6. Be nice to people you pass. You don't want to be a ****** to a hiker only to wreck a half mile later and have them be the first to happen upon you.
7. Use your head. On a new trail go slow until you know what is coming. Don't ride beyond your limits. You have to crawl before you walk. You probably aren't a racer and there is probably not prize money to be won at the end of most of your rides.
8. Carry a whistle and a light. A whistle is a very piercing noise and isn't normally heard in the woods. Words get lost in the wind and you may not be able to yell as loud as a whistle. Fox 40's are great. They are small and weight almost nothing. Clip it where it can easily be reached. Having it buried in your camelbak doesn't help.
9. Do this EVERY time you ride. Be it around the block or on an all day epic.

Be safe.
 

·
Trail Ninja
Joined
·
6,196 Posts
I honestly ride without much of a disaster plan. I check the weather and then I just put on my shoes, helmet, gloves, and hydration pack with tools to change a flat, keys, and wallet. I then ride to the trail and ride a loop or two through and ride back before it's totally dark.

I've gotten beat up a bit recently (scraps from brush, pedals bashing against my shin from slips, and a roll from going over the bars trying to ride down a steep 3 ft drop) and just ordered some pads off Pricepoint.com (Roach Knee/Shin, THE Storm Elbow, and some wrist supports). I figure this bit of preventative planning would be better than a disaster plan. If I get bloodied, I just splash it with water and fix it when I get home.

I've only recently become worried about breaking/fracturing bones since my bro fractured his wrist simply riding on the road and slipping in the night on some slick road (sprinkler overspray he says).
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top