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1- The mtb biker fled the scene and only called ER when he was in serious decline.
I drove home with a broken leg and went to the ER later. And if someone stabs you, getting out of there sounds like the smart thing to do (if you are not risking getting stabbed again).

Maybe the guy had a horrible health insurance and did not want to risk a high ER premium, thought he can go to the doctor tomorrow. I have seen many people delay healthcare because of cost, until they really have to.

We don't know enough to say he "fled".
 

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Sure. Here is the WAC for the State of Washington where this happened. Basically bikers have to yield to hikers, but hikers can't power trip and use that as an excuse to block everybody else.

WAC 332-52-410
"
(2) What are the responsibilities of persons operating motorized or nonmotorized vehicles on department-managed roads and trails?
(a) Persons operating motorized or nonmotorized vehicles shall:
(i) Use due care and control speed to avoid colliding with any person, animal, motorized or nonmotorized vehicle or other conveyance on or entering the roadway;


"(3) While operating a motorized or nonmotorized vehicle, who has the right of way?
(c) Pedestrians.
(i) Persons operating a motorized or nonmotorized vehicle shall yield the right of way to pedestrians.
(ii) Pedestrians must leave the road as soon as possible to allow the vehicle to pass.
"
"
(5) Any violation of this section is a traffic infraction under chapter 46.63 RCW except a violation of subsection (2)(b)(iii) of this section is a misdemeanor.
[Statutory Authority: Chapter 43.30 RCW and RCW 43.12.065. WSR 09-05-034, § 332-52-410, filed 2/11/09, effective 3/14/09.]



Yeah, but that isn't what you said in your original post. And this is about roads, not trails.
 

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Yeah, but that isn't what you said in your original post. And this is about roads, not trails.
Are you talking about the stabbing incident or something else? The articles say that the stabbing incident was on a trail.
 

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Did anyone bring up the point about the knife in the altercation being an illegal “spring blade knife?” That doesn’t look good for the defendant either.
 

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I think someone did bring up the type of knife earlier in the thread. There is a Kershaw spring loaded and a Microtech spring loaded.
 

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Did anyone bring up the point about the knife in the altercation being an illegal “spring blade knife?” That doesn’t look good for the defendant either.
Mentioned it briefly before, but have a bit more info now.

In Washington state "spring blade knives" are illegal. Originally I wasn't finding the definition for what was considered "spring blade knives" in the legal code. I wasn't sure if an assisted knife counted. But I poked around more and found it.

Here it is if anyone is wondering.

From THIS link (RCW 9.41.250).

(2) “Spring blade knife” means any knife, including a prototype, model, or other sample, with a blade that is automatically released by a spring mechanism or other mechanical device, or any knife having a blade which opens, or falls, or is ejected into position by the force of gravity, or by an outward, downward, or centrifugal thrust or movement.

A knife that contains a spring, detent, or other mechanism designed to create a bias toward closure of the blade and that requires physical exertion applied to the blade by hand, wrist, or arm to overcome the bias toward closure to assist in opening the knife is not a spring blade knife.


This should mean that Kershaw Speedsafe knives (and similar, with a bias towards closure) should be legal. Which means then that the knife used was likely some sort of out the front design (aka, a "full auto", or "OTF", or more commonly just called a "switchblade"). And, it looks like in WA, those are not just illegal to carry, but even to own (some states let you collect them, but not carry them).
 

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A few months ago, I was hiking my local trail that I ride every day when I came upon a group of guys on E-bikes resting (from what?) with their bikes lying right across the trail.

I told them they shouldn’t leave their bikes in the middle of the trail because a lot of people ride pretty fast through that section. They started getting in my face and made some insulting remarks about me being a hiker.

There were four of them and I had my arm in a sling from a crash and trip to the ER the week before so I just moved on. There was probably not much point in further discussion.


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I drove home with a broken leg and went to the ER later. And if someone stabs you, getting out of there sounds like the smart thing to do (if you are not risking getting stabbed again).

Maybe the guy had a horrible health insurance and did not want to risk a high ER premium, thought he can go to the doctor tomorrow. I have seen many people delay healthcare because of cost, until they really have to.

We don't know enough to say he "fled".
Fair points.
I once powered through a sprained corpus cavernosum. I did "leave" immediately afterwards though.

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Maybe it's me but I suspect a guy who spends a sh1t ton of time in the backcountry ripe with grizzlies might have a pretty good perspective on wildlife encounters vs some weekender in Central FL. But you go dude!

LULZ:
The lower 48 has no monopoly on morons.
Lulz.
 

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A few months ago, I was hiking my local trail that I ride every day when I came upon a group of guys on E-bikes resting (from what?) with their bikes lying right across the trail.

I told them they shouldn’t leave their bikes in the middle of the trail because a lot of people ride pretty fast through that section. They started getting in my face and made some insulting remarks about me being a hiker.

There were four of them and I had my arm in a sling from a crash and trip to the ER the week before so I just moved on. There was probably not much point in further discussion.


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Just curious, but the last paragraph makes it
sound like had you been more up to it, you might have thrown down??
 

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nah, they may look tough, but they're just sweetie pies in the end.
Turns out you are right. The National Park Service's advice is to stay calm and just talk to Bears.

"Identify yourself by talking calmly so the bear knows you"
"Stay calm and remember that most bears do not want to attack you; they usually just want to be left alone "
"Continue to talk to the bear in low tones; this will help you stay calmer"


Not sure how this is supposed to work though:
"Make yourselves look as large as possible "
 

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Not sure how this is supposed to work though:
"Make yourselves look as large as possible "
It simply means eat all the donuts in your backpack all the while making "MMMMMmmmmm, this is soooooo good" sounds.
 
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I find it interesting that if you walk down the sidewalk in a busy city people can manage to go around one another without getting all puffed up. Same goes for walking through a busy market in many foreign countries. People just flow around one another without giving it a second thought. Personal space becomes a matter of territoriality on trails for some reason. Is it only an American thing?
In my experience hikers have no problem walking past one another. When I’ve hiked I’ve never had issues with other trail users. What I have found is that there are some people who feel like bikes should not be on trails, or that bikers should dismount to pass them and get quite angry and rude about it.
 

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Good points Carl. I’m a wildlife buff and have learned to look for different body languages and what they mean in all wildlife I’m viewing. After seeing numerous Black Bears in the wild sleeping in trees I’ve come accustomed to looking for them up high in forested areas. They always pick the largest tree around that have a nice horizontal well covered canopy.

I’ve seen three bears sleeping in this tree at the same time. This day a month later there was one. A HUGE male boar. I gave him his space and peace and quiet and moved along.

1923270



This day I spotted a Sow female and her three Cubs.
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They were traveling on a mountain ridge about 200’ above a river. I was walking at a fast pace [almost running] on the other side of the river just trying to keep up with them to get some photos. I managed a couple of photos of the group as they entered a clearing. Suddenly the mother stopped looked at me then headed straight downhill towards me. I froze, 45 seconds later she emerged 75-100’ max out of the tall grass on the other side of the river directly across from me. I could have been easily taken had she kept coming. I was frozen still as she stopped at the rivers edge, our eyes met, I was frozen [scared as hell] for two minutes which seemed like 20, we were at a standoff. After I was convinced she knew I met no threat to her babies, I then turned slowly and walked away very slowly [in the opposite direction] looking over my shoulder the whole time. She watched me for a few seconds walk away slowly, she then turned and disappeared into the tall weeds behind her and headed up the mountain side back to her cubs.

Respect their space and read body language. Know how to act with the species you’re dealing with.
 

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Thanks for sharing DJ. I always groove on a bear sighting. Amongst my favorite creatures to observe. Grateful for the privilege of seeing a massive critter go about its business - the confidence & curiosity.

Really tuned to their scent. I know it's weird but they leave so much scat in my yard that I'm like a PI inspecting what the current food sources are.
 

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Good points Carl. I’m a wildlife buff and have learned to look for different body languages and what they mean in all wildlife I’m viewing. After seeing numerous Black Bears in the wild sleeping in trees I’ve come accustomed to looking for them up high in forested areas. They always pick the largest tree around that have a nice horizontal well covered canopy.
With your outdoors experience, do you have tips about reading the body language of hikers? 😀
 
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