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meow
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Stonegate residents in Scottsdale got an email notification today about a mountian lion sighting on the northern border of the Pima Indian res. I do training rides there a couple of times a week in the early evening...it made my hair stand straight up. If you ride in Lost Dog area you should be VERY careful, and don't ride alone.... :eek:

Stonegate E-Mail News of 5-05-05 - Extra!
Community Alert!

A mountain lion was sighted yesterday evening at about 6PM in the back yard of a Windcrest home adjacent to the wash. Two resident families got a good view of the animal as he walked the back wall -- possibly hunting, since dawn and dusk are prime hunting hours for these animals. The residents used the internet to confirm the description as a mountain lion, not a bobcat.

We border on a large expanse of undeveloped land. Our community is criss-crossed by trails and washes which serve as pathways for wildlife, as well as hikers and pet owners. In October and November of 2000, we were visited by a mountain lion which was eventually shot in Mesa, at the southern end of the same Pima reservation which borders Stonegate.

Bobcats and mountain lions are very different cats. Mountain lions do pose a danger to humans. Large, long-tailed and tawny colored (not spotted), they are wanderers, patrolling a territory which may be 40 square miles. If we are on this cat's territorial route, we will be visited again, possibly in a week or two.

We've talked to Joe Yarchin, urban wildlife specialist at the Mesa office of Arizona Game and Fish (480-981-9400). They will follow up. This is not a time to panic, but it is a good opportunity to become aware of the possibility of a return visit, and share the information with neighbors who may not get Stonegate E-Mail News. If you do see a mountain lion, please report the sighting, including the time and circumstances, to the Community Center - (480) 391-9760.

Food and water left out are attractants to many types of desert wildlife, and should be eliminated in any case. As a precaution, you may also want to adjust your dog-walking schedule to avoid being out at dawn and dusk.

The following excerpts from www.desertusa.com are aimed at hikers, but are worth thinking about:

How to reduce the chances of an encounter with a Mountain Lion:

Avoid hiking alone, especially between dusk and dawn, when lions normally do their hunting. Make plenty of noise while you hike so as to reduce the chances of surprising a lion.
Always keep children in sight while hiking and within arm's reach in areas that can conceal a lion. Mountain Lions seem to be drawn to children.
Hike with a good walking stick; this can be useful in warding off a lion.

How to reduce the chances of an attack when encountering a Mountain Lion:

Do not approach a lion, especially if it is feeding or with its young. Most lions will avoid confrontation. Give them a way to escape.
Stay calm and face the lion. Do not run because this may trigger the lion's instinct to attack. Try to appear larger by raising your hands.
Pick up small children so they don't panic and run. This will also make you appear larger. Avoid bending over or crouching.
If the lion acts aggressively, throw rocks, branches, or whatever can be obtained without turning your back or bending over.
Fight back if attacked. Since a mountain lion usually tries to bite the head or neck, try to remain standing and face the attacking animal. People have successfully fought back with rocks, sticks, or bare hands.
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I am Walt
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Cato said:
Stonegate residents in Scottsdale got an email notification today about a mountian lion sighting on the northern border of the Pima Indian res. I do training rides there a couple of times a week in the early evening...it made my hair stand straight up. If you ride in Lost Dog area you should be VERY careful, and don't ride alone.... :eek:
Yikes...I often ride the Lost Dog/Sunrise area alone, including at night. In fact, I very nearly went up Sunrise alone this past Weds. night, but was ultimately too tired.

I don't want to overreact, but it is spooky back in there at night, particularly going up Sunrise.
 

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Cato said:
Stonegate residents in Scottsdale got an email notification today about a mountian lion sighting on the northern border of the Pima Indian res. I do training rides there a couple of times a week in the early evening...it made my hair stand straight up. If you ride in Lost Dog area you should be VERY careful, and don't ride alone.... :eek:

Stonegate E-Mail News of 5-05-05 - Extra!
Community Alert!

A mountain lion was sighted yesterday evening at about 6PM in the back yard of a Windcrest home adjacent to the wash. Two resident families got a good view of the animal as he walked the back wall -- possibly hunting, since dawn and dusk are prime hunting hours for these animals. The residents used the internet to confirm the description as a mountain lion, not a bobcat.

We border on a large expanse of undeveloped land. Our community is criss-crossed by trails and washes which serve as pathways for wildlife, as well as hikers and pet owners. In October and November of 2000, we were visited by a mountain lion which was eventually shot in Mesa, at the southern end of the same Pima reservation which borders Stonegate.

Bobcats and mountain lions are very different cats. Mountain lions do pose a danger to humans. Large, long-tailed and tawny colored (not spotted), they are wanderers, patrolling a territory which may be 40 square miles. If we are on this cat's territorial route, we will be visited again, possibly in a week or two.

We've talked to Joe Yarchin, urban wildlife specialist at the Mesa office of Arizona Game and Fish (480-981-9400). They will follow up. This is not a time to panic, but it is a good opportunity to become aware of the possibility of a return visit, and share the information with neighbors who may not get Stonegate E-Mail News. If you do see a mountain lion, please report the sighting, including the time and circumstances, to the Community Center - (480) 391-9760.

Food and water left out are attractants to many types of desert wildlife, and should be eliminated in any case. As a precaution, you may also want to adjust your dog-walking schedule to avoid being out at dawn and dusk.

The following excerpts from www.desertusa.com are aimed at hikers, but are worth thinking about:

How to reduce the chances of an encounter with a Mountain Lion:

Avoid hiking alone, especially between dusk and dawn, when lions normally do their hunting. Make plenty of noise while you hike so as to reduce the chances of surprising a lion.
Always keep children in sight while hiking and within arm's reach in areas that can conceal a lion. Mountain Lions seem to be drawn to children.
Hike with a good walking stick; this can be useful in warding off a lion.

How to reduce the chances of an attack when encountering a Mountain Lion:

Do not approach a lion, especially if it is feeding or with its young. Most lions will avoid confrontation. Give them a way to escape.
Stay calm and face the lion. Do not run because this may trigger the lion's instinct to attack. Try to appear larger by raising your hands.
Pick up small children so they don't panic and run. This will also make you appear larger. Avoid bending over or crouching.
If the lion acts aggressively, throw rocks, branches, or whatever can be obtained without turning your back or bending over.
Fight back if attacked. Since a mountain lion usually tries to bite the head or neck, try to remain standing and face the attacking animal. People have successfully fought back with rocks, sticks, or bare hands.
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They forgot: leave the kibble and bits flavored gels at home.
 

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No Clue Crew
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My g/f and I were riding the little paved trails through McDowell Mountain Ranch to get to the dirt stuff around the golf course last week and saw a good-sized bobcat right in the middle of MMR. It was kinda scary, truth be told.
d
 

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Occidental Tourist
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Kitty gotta eat too.
Sad to hear the last one was shot.
 

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If people persist in trespassing upon the lions' territory, we must accept the fact that the lions, from time to time, will harvest a few trespassers. If you see one, consider yourself lucky. They don't like to be seen and there aren't that many of them. I've seen three, luck is one of my skills.
 

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MTBR Mafia
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bikemiker said:
If people persist in trespassing upon the lions' territory, we must accept the fact that the lions, from time to time, will harvest a few trespassers. If you see one, consider yourself lucky. They don't like to be seen and there aren't that many of them. I've seen three, luck is one of my skills.
Nicely put. Also, they are stuck in the middle of the desert but just in reach is water and tons of animals and garbage to eat. what do you do, starve in the desert or enter the sweet oasis?
 

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I'm not sure why this comes as a surprise. I live in a golf course community very close to Greasewood flat and Reata Pass. I have a Bobcat that lives in between my house and my neighbors and see mountain lions several times a year, along with lots of rattle snakes. We get along just fine. In fact many times I will find the bobcat sleeping in between my front gate and front door. I never feed the cat nor do I leave anything around it could confuse with food. I decided to move into the mountains and must live with the creatures that were there before me.
 

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Occidental Tourist
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truble911 said:
I decided to move into the mountains and must live with the creatures that were there before me.
If only you and the folks above were in the majority. Good on ya.
 

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Right on

bikemiker said:
If people persist in trespassing upon the lions' territory, we must accept the fact that the lions, from time to time, will harvest a few trespassers. If you see one, consider yourself lucky. They don't like to be seen and there aren't that many of them. I've seen three, luck is one of my skills.
I just moved here from Santa Cruz, Ca and have seen more Mountain Lions and Bobcats than I can count while riding there and in other areas in northern CA over the last 20 plus years. Just give them room to run and consider yourself lucky to encounter these magnificant creatures. Don't run from them and they shouldn't chase you. Make yourself look large, give them space and you should be alright. Shoot them, NO! It's their space we're tresspassing in. Don't be such an afraidy cat!
 
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