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I was watching TV last night and KY is making a bunch of oils. Maybe one of those would work?

Oh..Just think if all that works you could ask for sponsorship. Then you would be wearing a KY jersey and pants. AWESOME!!
 

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SHIVER ME TIMBERS said:
that one sucks...get the cherry flavor....better for ATM...chicks dig it
Cherry flovored anal lube? Maybe chocolate covered cherry flavor. How would you know the taste anyway, aren't you usually on the receiving end?:p
 

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trail fairy
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ffhb

Right man as some said ya can jump on here then buy the FLUID [not oil] online!

Viscosity Im not going to get into, check out at an LBS next time ya go there, what they have in there mechanics bay, I'd be surpised if they can work on a DH bike if they don't use Moto cycle fork FLUID [not engine oils or Automatic oils etc]

For Damper side, you may be best with std bike Fluid, for lower legs depending on fork type ya have, I would use a Moto X FLUID. same wieght rec or with rec speccs of ya fork manufacturer.

e.g Motorex would be my number on choice, Motul, or Bel Ray

Moto X Fluid comes in the same FUILD weight as MTb one key thing is the quality of the FLUID, Motorrex for example is one of the best for maintaining its viscosity over time adn during use, e.g like any fulid it breaks or tries to break down under dissipation heat and cooling, and can contaminate, so best is best,.

Like a car put cheap oil in get high engine repair bills, same with fork, put in quality FLUID [specific] not engine oil and you get what you get.

If I don;t service my car myself I buy my oils and take it in and watch them do the work, I only use Mobil in my cars, in my bikes I prefer Motorex for suspension and ATF in my Coke n bourbon, usually while doing maintenance :D

check ya specc's then order online any of those 3, some may prefer others, Motorex is hard to pass up, BR for you USA boys or Maxima :thumbsup:
 

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Meh.
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Mobil One synthetic is no longer the leading oil as they have changed the formulation.

The labeled viscosity of one brand may be completely different from the labeled viscosity of another. A perfect example is that Torco RFF 7wt is the exact same as Rockshox 5wt. Rockshox purchases and rebrands Torco. Maxima RSF 7wt is actually lighter than Spectro 5wt and Silkolene Pro RSF 7.5wt is actually heavier than Showa SS-8 10wt. Also viscosity may be measured at different temperatures.These are in fact oils, Torco RFF is a blend of VI synthetic and mineral oils. It is a petroleum product. In fact, Bel-Ray, Motorex, Torco, Motul (and many others) even call it an oil themselves.

Synthetic motor oil is fine for the lowers for semi-bath forks, and is often recommended in service manuals.

http://www.belray.com/consumer/product.fsp?pid=1330
http://www.motorexusa.com/prod_detail.asp?id=81
http://www.motul.com.au/product_line_up/fork_brake_others/others01.html
 

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RaindogT said:
I don't know the answer that you seek, but I will say that any motorcycle/ atv shop will have fork oil. Don't know if that crossed your mind or not, but I would go that route before using motor oil in your fork.
Isn't motorcycle fork oil the same as bicycle fork oil?
 

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trail fairy
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Maybe the case with Mobil in the US, I don;'t know what formulation they use here but we have out own refining company here, Mobil here create all formulation for all companies to there specc [re car oils]

After many years using Mobile and knowing some in the drag racing industry with Mobil I won't use anything else also a little bit biased I guess, but Its never let me down unlike some that I won't mention here. Still not really related to Fork Fluids lol :D
 

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Underskilled
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For the record guy 'synthetic' oils are now rarely what we would classify as synthetic.

They used to be until some cemist and a lawyer got together and would out a way of making a crude oil distilate fit into the synthetic term.
So none of the advantages of synthetic, but half the price to produce, same cost to sell, more money.

A few companies out there still make true synthetic, but it is expensive, but you get what you pay for.

my 2c agrees with a lot of the above, put fork oil in the dampener, for lube not so important.

Every motor bike shop in the world should have fork oil.
 

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CaveGiant said:
For the record guy 'synthetic' oils are now rarely what we would classify as synthetic.

They used to be until some cemist and a lawyer got together and would out a way of making a crude oil distilate fit into the synthetic term.
So none of the advantages of synthetic, but half the price to produce, same cost to sell, more money.

A few companies out there still make true synthetic, but it is expensive, but you get what you pay for.

my 2c agrees with a lot of the above, put fork oil in the dampener, for lube not so important.

Every motor bike shop in the world should have fork oil.
hmmm. got any links discussing this?
 

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Underskilled
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nope, just read an article that seemed genuine enough to convince me (scientist, most BS marketing crap ignored).
 

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Meh.
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CaveGiant said:
For the record guy 'synthetic' oils are now rarely what we would classify as synthetic.

They used to be until some cemist and a lawyer got together and would out a way of making a crude oil distilate fit into the synthetic term.
So none of the advantages of synthetic, but half the price to produce, same cost to sell, more money.

A few companies out there still make true synthetic, but it is expensive, but you get what you pay for.

my 2c agrees with a lot of the above, put fork oil in the dampener, for lube not so important.

Every motor bike shop in the world should have fork oil.
Yes, many synthetics are a blend of synthetic and mineral oils. There are full synthetics as well.

There different base stocks and blends.

* Polyalphaolefin (PAO) = American Petroleum Institute (API) Group IV base oil
* Synthetic esters, etc = API Group V base oils (non-PAO synthetics, including diesters, polyolesters, alklylated napthlenes, alkyklated benzenes, etc.)
* Hydrocracked/Hydroisomerized = API Group III base oils. Chevron, Shell, and other petrochemical companies developed processes involving catalytic conversion of feed stocks under pressure in the presence of hydrogen into high quality mineral lubricating oil. In 2005 production of GTL (Gas-to-liquid) Group III base stocks began. The best of these perform much like polyalphaolefin. Group III base stocks are considered synthetic motor oil ONLY in the United States. Group III based lubricants are not allowed to be marketed as "synthetic" in any market outside of the USA.

Group II and Group III type base stocks help to formulate more economic type semi-synthetic lubricants. Group I, II, II+ and III type mineral base oil stocks are widely used in combination with additive packages, performance packages, ester and/or Group IV polyalphaolefins in order to formulate semi-synthetic based lubricants. Group III base oils are sometimes considered as synthetic but they are still classified as highest top level mineral base stocks. A Synthetic or Synthesized material is one that is produced by combining or building individual units into a unified entry. Synthetic base stocks as described above are man-made and tailored to have a controlled molecular structure with predictable properties, unlike mineral base oils which are complex mixtures of naturally occurring hydrocarbons.

Hydrocracked/Hydroisomerized = API Group III base oils. Chevron, Shell, and other petrochemical companies developed processes involving catalytic conversion of feed stocks under pressure in the presence of hydrogen into high quality mineral lubricating oil. In 2005 production of GTL (Gas-to-liquid) Group III base stocks began. Even though they are considered a synthetic product they are still mineral base stocks and counted as the mineral part of all semi-synthetic lubricants. Group III base stocks [with certain amount of mixture of PAOs and esters and Group V] are considered synthetic motor oil ONLY in the United States. Group III based lubricants are not allowed to be marketed as "synthetic" in any market outside of the USA.
 

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XSL_WiLL said:
Yes, many synthetics are a blend of synthetic and mineral oils. There are full synthetics as well.

There different base stocks and blends.

* Polyalphaolefin (PAO) = American Petroleum Institute (API) Group IV base oil
* Synthetic esters, etc = API Group V base oils (non-PAO synthetics, including diesters, polyolesters, alklylated napthlenes, alkyklated benzenes, etc.)
* Hydrocracked/Hydroisomerized = API Group III base oils. Chevron, Shell, and other petrochemical companies developed processes involving catalytic conversion of feed stocks under pressure in the presence of hydrogen into high quality mineral lubricating oil. In 2005 production of GTL (Gas-to-liquid) Group III base stocks began. The best of these perform much like polyalphaolefin. Group III base stocks are considered synthetic motor oil ONLY in the United States. Group III based lubricants are not allowed to be marketed as "synthetic" in any market outside of the USA.

Group II and Group III type base stocks help to formulate more economic type semi-synthetic lubricants. Group I, II, II+ and III type mineral base oil stocks are widely used in combination with additive packages, performance packages, ester and/or Group IV polyalphaolefins in order to formulate semi-synthetic based lubricants. Group III base oils are sometimes considered as synthetic but they are still classified as highest top level mineral base stocks. A Synthetic or Synthesized material is one that is produced by combining or building individual units into a unified entry. Synthetic base stocks as described above are man-made and tailored to have a controlled molecular structure with predictable properties, unlike mineral base oils which are complex mixtures of naturally occurring hydrocarbons.

Hydrocracked/Hydroisomerized = API Group III base oils. Chevron, Shell, and other petrochemical companies developed processes involving catalytic conversion of feed stocks under pressure in the presence of hydrogen into high quality mineral lubricating oil. In 2005 production of GTL (Gas-to-liquid) Group III base stocks began. Even though they are considered a synthetic product they are still mineral base stocks and counted as the mineral part of all semi-synthetic lubricants. Group III base stocks [with certain amount of mixture of PAOs and esters and Group V] are considered synthetic motor oil ONLY in the United States. Group III based lubricants are not allowed to be marketed as "synthetic" in any market outside of the USA.

I think I just had a brain aneurysm.....:eekster:
 

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Meh.
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LonesomeCowboyBert said:
....the cut and paste king strikes again........:drumroll:
I don't often copy and paste, but yes, I should have cited my source as wikipedia. I felt it was easier and more thorough than me explaining base stocks.
 

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rebmem rbtm
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I have used motor oil in a fork before and had not many problems, its lasted from before i joined this site until just last week in a rock shox judy. i used penzoil, pretty stiction free. the only problem i saw with it was that the oil contains additives (detergents, metals to prevent contact, condtioners etc). what went bad was the top cap seals (easily repairable) starting shooting oil from pressure build up (overfilled it big time on a refill service). I wouldnt do it again though, especially given correct fork oil is about the same price as a quart of any decent oil.

also keep in mind (despite claims from oil companies) alot of the products do not like mixing. i work and train in the auto industry and i can tell you first hand that valvoline and penzoil hate each other with a passion when combined (just an example). same goes for synthetics and non-synthetics, of even the same brand.
 

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ya i already know that... just got done reading for the last 15 mins about all this... its just another designation for how a oil flows/characteristics/designation.... its all mashes together in the bottle. lol guess maybe they just call it that to make it simpler for people... ??? weight is thrown around in all the reading i did ALOT but nothing that really said why WEIGHT was used......but yes they did explain viscosity...which i already knew....
but one way or another it can still be used in forks as long as ya find the right "viscosity"-"weight" ....... atf is used in motorcycle forks all the time.. no different than engine oils.... will all protect the internals and flow as needed if the right "weight/viscosity"
Weight of oil is temperature related. Example 5w-30 oil will have a viscosity of a 5w oil at low temp and viscosity of 30w at high temp. From a chemist at an oil company it is 5weight oil with an additive to make it perform like 30w at higher temp. So it is all viscosity, but completely temp dependent.
 

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May The Force Be With You
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fork oil is probably closer to transmission/hydraulic fluid
 
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