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So, I just got in my second day on the Motion E18. First was riding smoothish, slightly flowing trails with poorly designed berms that tend to not have proper exits and easy rock gardens. Second day was on the St. Louis DH. This lower section is super rough, with nasty, jagged, steep, lava drops that I thought would really test the fork. I wasn't wrong.

Full Disclosure: I got in touch with Motion before their fork was even for sale. I thought it looked like a really good design that addressed some issues that I was having with my RS Pike. I paid full price once they went on sale and then ordered a second one when they opened up the 20% off ambassador program. The first is on a 2017 YT Jeffsy CF One, replacing the RS Pike RCT3 150mm with a Motion E18 160mm. The second is going on a 2018 Knolly Delirium (it hasn't shipped yet) with a 188mm travel CCDB CS Coil in the rear and replacing a 170mm MRP Ribbon.

Me: I rode all through my younger years in HS and college back in the last century. Took 20 something years off and recently got back into the MTB game. It's even better than I remember. I'm reasonably good technically, really bad cardioly, and I'm learning to hit bigger jumps although gaps still scare me because consequences. But I did just case the hardest I ever have today (not my fault, the trail builders have been doing mad work lately and they increased the gap by a foot and a half.) and it was no big deal, so I'm getting better and more confident.

So, the claims:

1. Anti Dive. It's called the Motion anti dive fork. This is completely legit. I never realized before how much brake dive contributed to how I rode. I know you're not supposed to brake through the corners, but when they're really steep and the berm ends before the corner does you just have to brake. Brake dive loads up the front end, compresses the fork, reduces the available travel, and reduces traction. After I put the E18 on I realized how much I was using body movement to combat the effects of brake dive and how much it reduced traction. Today, well, no brake dive and having full travel and sensitivity through the corner is really cool.

The second part, and where St. Louis really shines (or bites) is steep, technical, rock drops, where you have to be hard on the brakes, going down a steep face, with lots of lava boulders strewn about. After the first couple drops I quit worrying about my line. At all. Where the pike would be really compressed due to braking and I'd be sitting in the back seat avoiding the rocks, I just went straight. Having full travel and not worrying about getting pitched over the bars is glorious. I'm sold.

2. Axle path. Less to say about this, but it's still really cool and definitely a noticeable improvement over a stick fork. Due to the increased confidence I was pretty much just rampaging a trail that I hadn't ridden in 6 months. I missed a lot of the rock "rolls" and turned them into drops. And didn't crash. Going off 2 foot drops and expecting a rollout rock only to find it a foot to the left led to several nose heavy landings. Ones that would definitely have pitched me over the bars on the Pike. I could definitely feel, just at the point where I expected the nose to tuck under, the axle path go vertical and stay on track, out front, and stable. F'n cool. And not bloodied by lava.

3. Stiction/suppleness. One of the main gripes I have with both the Pike and the Ribbon is the stiction and lack of small bump absorbtion. I'm old and riding chattery crap hurts after a while. I feel like, and other reports indicate, that stick forks up the low speed compression dampening to deal with brake dive. Between that and stiction riding chattery rocks and roots doesn't really get mitigated much.

With the E18 there is no stiction. Also, because it doesn't have to deal with damping out brake dive, it can use less LS compression.

I ran one click faster on the rebound side on the Ohana trail, which is generally pretty smooth, and it felt good. On St. Louis I tried that same setting and it felt good, but I seemed to be using up too much of my travel on small 1-2 foot drops. It was butter smooth, but
I felt like I was getting too far into the travel to deal with bigger hits. I tried 2 clicks into the compression/rebound side but it seemed to be too chattery over 4-6" roots so I set it on 1 click into C/R side and was pretty happy. Keep in mind that I weigh 95kg, so I think most riders will be pretty just messing about on the rebound side untill they hit the park and need the additional compression for big jumps.

4. Stiffness. It's stiff. The thing doesn't ****ing move. It surprised the hell out of me the first time I racked it up in my 1Up. The Pike flexes an inch or three. The E18 moved a half inch and stopped. It doesn't move sideways either.

5. "Maintenance Free" Who knows? I have 2 rides on it. But Motion has 100,000 km on one of their early forks with no wobble or wear, so I'm inclined to believe it will outlast the next couple frames I buy.

6. Price. Yeah, it costs. But it really is a better fork design (I feel after riding it) and if the "no maintenance" claims hold up, it will be cheaper in the long run than a Fox 36 with 3-4 rebuilds on it.

7. Looks. Some like, some hate. (Online) But everyone I've run into on the trail has been universally, "Holy ****, that thing is cool." And then you spend 10 minutes talking to a new riding buddy.


SO: On to the downsides. (There really aren't any)

Seriously. The only thing that kind of niggled me about this fork was the lack of a proper top-out bumper of some sort. Everyone likes a silentish ride and when I got into high speed running over 4-6" roots the fork starts to rattle. Not because anything is loose, it isn't, but because it likes to ride high in the travel, and it gives a little clunk when it tops out. A bit of elastomer would be a nice addition there.

Independently adjustable HS/LS rebound and compression would be nice. But the system they have is really good for 95% of riders. I'm just a suspension geek, although not really a good enough rider to do anything with it.

And, obviously, swappable blade spring curves. What they have really will work for 95% of the riders out there, but because interwebz, having a half dozen different springs for different riders on different terrains would be helpful.
 

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So, I just got in my second day on the Motion E18. First was riding smoothish, slightly flowing trails with poorly designed berms that tend to not have proper exits and easy rock gardens. Second day was on the St. Louis DH. This lower section is super rough, with nasty, jagged, steep, lava drops that I thought would really test the fork. I wasn't wrong.

Full Disclosure: I got in touch with Motion before their fork was even for sale. I thought it looked like a really good design that addressed some issues that I was having with my RS Pike. I paid full price once they went on sale and then ordered a second one when they opened up the 20% off ambassador program. The first is on a 2017 YT Jeffsy CF One, replacing the RS Pike RCT3 150mm with a Motion E18 160mm. The second is going on a 2018 Knolly Delirium (it hasn't shipped yet) with a 188mm travel CCDB CS Coil in the rear and replacing a 170mm MRP Ribbon.

Me: I rode all through my younger years in HS and college back in the last century. Took 20 something years off and recently got back into the MTB game. It's even better than I remember. I'm reasonably good technically, really bad cardioly, and I'm learning to hit bigger jumps although gaps still scare me because consequences. But I did just case the hardest I ever have today (not my fault, the trail builders have been doing mad work lately and they increased the gap by a foot and a half.) and it was no big deal, so I'm getting better and more confident.

So, the claims:

1. Anti Dive. It's called the Motion anti dive fork. This is completely legit. I never realized before how much brake dive contributed to how I rode. I know you're not supposed to brake through the corners, but when they're really steep and the berm ends before the corner does you just have to brake. Brake dive loads up the front end, compresses the fork, reduces the available travel, and reduces traction. After I put the E18 on I realized how much I was using body movement to combat the effects of brake dive and how much it reduced traction. Today, well, no brake dive and having full travel and sensitivity through the corner is really cool.

The second part, and where St. Louis really shines (or bites) is steep, technical, rock drops, where you have to be hard on the brakes, going down a steep face, with lots of lava boulders strewn about. After the first couple drops I quit worrying about my line. At all. Where the pike would be really compressed due to braking and I'd be sitting in the back seat avoiding the rocks, I just went straight. Having full travel and not worrying about getting pitched over the bars is glorious. I'm sold.

2. Axle path. Less to say about this, but it's still really cool and definitely a noticeable improvement over a stick fork. Due to the increased confidence I was pretty much just rampaging a trail that I hadn't ridden in 6 months. I missed a lot of the rock "rolls" and turned them into drops. And didn't crash. Going off 2 foot drops and expecting a rollout rock only to find it a foot to the left led to several nose heavy landings. Ones that would definitely have pitched me over the bars on the Pike. I could definitely feel, just at the point where I expected the nose to tuck under, the axle path go vertical and stay on track, out front, and stable. F'n cool. And not bloodied by lava.

3. Stiction/suppleness. One of the main gripes I have with both the Pike and the Ribbon is the stiction and lack of small bump absorbtion. I'm old and riding chattery crap hurts after a while. I feel like, and other reports indicate, that stick forks up the low speed compression dampening to deal with brake dive. Between that and stiction riding chattery rocks and roots doesn't really get mitigated much.

With the E18 there is no stiction. Also, because it doesn't have to deal with damping out brake dive, it can use less LS compression.

I ran one click faster on the rebound side on the Ohana trail, which is generally pretty smooth, and it felt good. On St. Louis I tried that same setting and it felt good, but I seemed to be using up too much of my travel on small 1-2 foot drops. It was butter smooth, but
I felt like I was getting too far into the travel to deal with bigger hits. I tried 2 clicks into the compression/rebound side but it seemed to be too chattery over 4-6" roots so I set it on 1 click into C/R side and was pretty happy. Keep in mind that I weigh 95kg, so I think most riders will be pretty just messing about on the rebound side untill they hit the park and need the additional compression for big jumps.

4. Stiffness. It's stiff. The thing doesn't ****ing move. It surprised the hell out of me the first time I racked it up in my 1Up. The Pike flexes an inch or three. The E18 moved a half inch and stopped. It doesn't move sideways either.

5. "Maintenance Free" Who knows? I have 2 rides on it. But Motion has 100,000 km on one of their early forks with no wobble or wear, so I'm inclined to believe it will outlast the next couple frames I buy.

6. Price. Yeah, it costs. But it really is a better fork design (I feel after riding it) and if the "no maintenance" claims hold up, it will be cheaper in the long run than a Fox 36 with 3-4 rebuilds on it.

7. Looks. Some like, some hate. (Online) But everyone I've run into on the trail has been universally, "Holy ****, that thing is cool." And then you spend 10 minutes talking to a new riding buddy.


SO: On to the downsides. (There really aren't any)

Seriously. The only thing that kind of niggled me about this fork was the lack of a proper top-out bumper of some sort. Everyone likes a silentish ride and when I got into high speed running over 4-6" roots the fork starts to rattle. Not because anything is loose, it isn't, but because it likes to ride high in the travel, and it gives a little clunk when it tops out. A bit of elastomer would be a nice addition there.

Independently adjustable HS/LS rebound and compression would be nice. But the system they have is really good for 95% of riders. I'm just a suspension geek, although not really a good enough rider to do anything with it.

And, obviously, swappable blade spring curves. What they have really will work for 95% of the riders out there, but because interwebz, having a half dozen different springs for different riders on different terrains would be helpful.
Nice! Thanks for the review. Sounds like it basically performs as it was supposed to. Do you know how much it weighs relative to the other forks?

It will be interesting to see if end up adjusting you riding style substantially over the next few months. Seems like as much good/bad press the Trust fork got, it may come down to forgetting some old habits and learning to utilize the new forks....but from the sounds of it, you were able to slip right onto this without much adjustment.

Got any pics?
 

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Discussion Starter #12
How is it hucking to flat? The Trust reviews suggest that landings are harsh, wondering if this is the case with all linkage forks.
It isn't harsh at all, super plush, in fact. I initially was riding it in the "trail" mode, open compression dampening and 1 click faster rebound, and although it felt good in the chatter I felt like I was using too much of the travel on ~2 foot drops to flat. They felt good, but I thought anything bigger could maybe bottom out. So I turned the damper over to 1 click into the "park" side of things, which adds a bit more compression and it felt great. Still very smooth on the landings, but more absorbtion throughout the whole stroke rather than using the progressivity at the end.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
In the manual it says the springs are replaceable and I recall reading somewhere that they plan on coming up with a few different ones down the road. But the stock one works from 50-100kg or so. I'm 95kg and don't have it maxed out.
 

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Ride Fast Take Chances :)
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Nice work. Thanks for sharing.
 

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Hey, just checking for any further impressions since you've had it a couple weeks now, any updates or thought changes?
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Not really, been working so I only have 2 more rides on it. I'm noticing that I have a lot more grip on the front end (either that more faith in my grip) so I can comfortably push harder through the corners. I finally successfully hit a 3-4 foot rock drop to flatish that I crashed on previously and it felt really good and stable on landing. Last time I hit it the front end washed out (Pike) and this time everything felt super plush and stable. The drop pretty much just disappeared. May or may not be attributable to the fork, though. I don't have enough experience on drops to definitively say. But, all in all, I'm still loving it.

I have a 170mm version coming too for my Knolly, but depending on the arrival timing I may give it to a friend to run on his Capra for a couple weeks. He's a MUCH better rider than I am so should be able to provide more input. But that depends on when it arrives.
 

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Thanks OP for your review :thumbsup:. I found this review on YouTube : well detailed with good camera angles and technical trail riding. Also I like how the rider pointed the good the bad and the ugly without sugar coating.

The rider on this video claim some lateral flex on steep terrain or under heavy braking . also some sort of stiction after sometime riding in the European winter.

Even with that he says the suspension inspire confidence and tons of traction!

bunniboi do you agree or felt anything like it?

I always liked linkage front suspensions since the AMP/Girvin days. Now with better material , design and technology we could be seeing a new gen of front suspension and designs. Just like full suspensions bikes 20 years ago.

The looks of it reminds me the terminator arm without its skin, So robotic.. I'm digging it! I think the Insurgent needs one :cool:



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fov7XPtuesc
 
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