Mountain Bike Reviews Forum banner
1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
45 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've got a new 2004 ellsworth truth and i'm having problems with the seat tube scratching up my seatpost, i've cleaned inside and out, regreased yet its still doing it, which is a pain as i lower the seatpost when changing shocks (i got a Ti romic and a fox float) its leaving quite deep scores on my nice new thompson seatpost.

So is this a problem with 2004 ellsworth frames, it looks like its caused by the hole thats been put in at the seat tube and top tube for welding, so am i just going to have to buy a new seatpost and only use that one at my normal riding height and use the other when changing shocks?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,982 Posts
Brannigan said:
I've got a new 2004 ellsworth truth and i'm having problems with the seat tube scratching up my seatpost, i've cleaned inside and out, regreased yet its still doing it, which is a pain as i lower the seatpost when changing shocks (i got a Ti romic and a fox float) its leaving quite deep scores on my nice new thompson seatpost.

So is this a problem with 2004 ellsworth frames, it looks like its caused by the hole thats been put in at the seat tube and top tube for welding, so am i just going to have to buy a new seatpost and only use that one at my normal riding height and use the other when changing shocks?
That's unacceptable in a frame that costs that much. It's a warranty issue. Contact Ellsworth and have them make it right. This one should be easy to prove.
 

·
Trail rider and racer
Joined
·
4,691 Posts
Brannigan said:
I've got a new 2004 ellsworth truth and i'm having problems with the seat tube scratching up my seatpost, i've cleaned inside and out, regreased yet its still doing it, which is a pain as i lower the seatpost when changing shocks (i got a Ti romic and a fox float) its leaving quite deep scores on my nice new thompson seatpost.

So is this a problem with 2004 ellsworth frames, it looks like its caused by the hole thats been put in at the seat tube and top tube for welding, so am i just going to have to buy a new seatpost and only use that one at my normal riding height and use the other when changing shocks?
Cleaned inside and out?

Did you lightly sand the inside of the tubing - some frames require that. Did you use grease? Did you assure the seatpost is correct in diameter? Are you being at all hamfisted putting your post i?

So this may not be a problem with 2004 frames. My frame didn't have the problem and we haven't heard of the problem really at this stage.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
45 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I've checked inside and out, the seatpost is a 27.2mm thompson, i'm using some finish line grease, the top of the range stuff out of a new tube, as for lightly sanding the inside of the tube, nobody should have to do that to a new bike, the tubing comes from easton and should be pretty much perfect. As for the reason for this, its coming from the breather hole thats been drilled in the seat tube, someones drilled out the breather hole for welding it to the top tube and they haven't de-burred the hole, now at the time using a simple deburring tool would have removed all jagged edges but now that its welded its nigh on impossible to debur the hole.

I know a fair bit about this as my day job is an aircraft engineer, so its a bit saddening to find out that my 2k frame is going to destroy every seatpost i stick in there unless i try to file it off using a half round file, which in the end could end up causing more damage, i might try to use an abrasive stone on it but finding one thats long enough will be a bit of a job.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
45 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I was only trying to give all the info, as for tubing, its nothing to do with the problem, i just mentioned it to state that its the breather hole, not the tubing. As for the grease, i was more trying to state its a brand new tube, theres no grit or rubbish in it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
29 Posts
Here's the Dealio:

Your seatpost is constructed from what material? 6000 series, maybe 7000 series aluminum? Carbon fiber perhaps? (Fairly soft material)
The seat tube is comprised of proprietary 6000 series aluminum.
Here is the point, yes it could be possible to get some scuffing, chaffing, or tight fitment with these male female components. In this condition what Steve 3 suggested would be a reasonable course of action. However the condition these folks are describing may likely be the result of something else…

The Ellsworth surface tube construction process calls for a hard anodized, shot peened surface finish. (Which is later laser etched) The shot peening process involves pelting the frame's exterior at a high velocity ( approx 200mph) by tiny steel balls. These balls
are blown out at the factory and each and every frame is QC'ed individually. First we run a Go, No Go sizing gauge, then install a Thompson 410 seatpost in every frame. The frames are not scratching the seatpost at the time they are shipped from our facility, they are 100% inspected. Sometimes these tiny steel balls get lodged or settle in the frame and get shaken loose during shipment. This condition seems more prevalent with frames with are shipped greater distances. (Internationally, or cross country domestic ground service by the men in brown)
Anyhow the gouges you are describing which are scratching the seatpost may likely be the result of a few mischievous steel shot peen balls lodged in the seattube. Steel is much harder than aluminum and may be the culprit here. Grease can actually make removal of the steel shot difficult and very hard to get out. Clean it with a wire brush, maybe some solvent if you have used grease, then blast it out with a high pressure air compressor, maybe also invert the frame and shake it to dislodge any more stray steel balls. This should exorcise your problem for good. This condition is actually common with manufactures which use hard anodized, shot peened tube surfaces. We will issue a service bulletin to our dealers to double check this condition at the shop level prior to delivering frames to owners. Sorry about the hassle.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
45 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
hmm, i might have argued those points EW but since me and blower are both in the sunny UK i guess thats the proof, although it wasn't men in brown, it was some company called bax international, who make UPS and USPS look like saints!!!!


Anyway i'll get stuck in with a wire brush, i have 2 thomson seatposts so its not too much of a killer, i was just querying it due to this being my third ellsworth frame and the first to give me problems.

As for the shot/roto peening, i used to have to do that on stuff at my work, i remember pretty well the fact that the balls could get into places they weren't meant to, the only way of making sure it never got in there was to use blanking plates/plugs on every access to the internals of the component, then use the air hose to clean it up after, then after that it was a case of sticking the component into a petroleum pressure washer and after that a tank of trichloerethane vapour to clean it all up, i doubt ellsworths budget runs to that though, otherwise the frames would double in price to pay for the new kit.

:D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,982 Posts
Brannigan said:
hmm, i might have argued those points EW but since me and blower are both in the sunny UK i guess thats the proof, although it wasn't men in brown, it was some company called bax international, who make UPS and USPS look like saints!!!!

Anyway i'll get stuck in with a wire brush, i have 2 thomson seatposts so its not too much of a killer, i was just querying it due to this being my third ellsworth frame and the first to give me problems.

As for the shot/roto peening, i used to have to do that on stuff at my work, i remember pretty well the fact that the balls could get into places they weren't meant to, the only way of making sure it never got in there was to use blanking plates/plugs on every access to the internals of the component, then use the air hose to clean it up after, then after that it was a case of sticking the component into a petroleum pressure washer and after that a tank of trichloerethane vapour to clean it all up, i doubt ellsworths budget runs to that though, otherwise the frames would double in price to pay for the new kit.

:D
I'd take it back to where I bought the frame and let them [email protected] around with it. Maybe if a quick hit with a wire brush does the trick it'd be OK, but to go through running solvent down the tube...brushing...high pressure air....what a hassle.

I suppose Ellsworth could have offered to fix it for you, but maybe they thought that tearing down your frame to send back wouldn't be worth it to you. Either way.....they should have offered...just to be supportive.

That line about 100% inspected. How could that be true if you have this problem? Maybe they meant that 100% of the bikes are inspected, but not very well. Unreal.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
727 Posts
XS Truth frame residue

I just purchased an extra small Truth for my wife about a week ago....brand spanking new off the production line and just available this year. I bought her the frame after my experience with my 2000 Truth. She's stoked after drooling at my Truth for years but too short to ride it. I am a total believer of the Ellsworth ICT. I can't claim to have ridden all of the high end bikes out there but the SC, Intense, Yeti I've ridden do not compare in the department of instant energy transfer from pedaling. Others like Epic, NRS, Fuel where bobbing is minimized do not compare in terms of suspension activeness and plushness.

With that said, I'm a little dissapointed with the seat tube and bottom bracket fitment issues I had when I was putting together the Mini Truth. I had much trouble inserting the specified 27.2 seatpost into the seat tube and I was told about the blasting bead residue when I called Ellsworth. Later I found difficulties threading in the bottom bracket. Upon inspection I found beads in the bottom bracket shell and in the threads. Also, there were scraps of aluminum hanging on the tube cut outs where they meet the threads. The beads caused a bit of cross thread on the BB cups and would have damage it if I had force them in. The scrap aluminum where the threads intersect the bottom tubing cutout had also stopped the cups from going in completely. I had to take a thin, round file to clean off the aluminum scrap haning on the thread and file the edges a bit. I then had to take the half-assembled frameset outside to run some solvent and pressurized water through the seat tube and bottom bracket to clean out the residues.

It wasn't a huge ordeal but indeed a hassle and it potentially could have damaged the BB cups. If I had known before hand it would be easier to flush and hose it prior to assmebling the components. I think this could have been avoided if holes were plugged during the sand blasting process. I think having nice, clean seat tube and bottom bracket is not too much to ask for when buying, I believe, the most expensive and best cross country frame on the market.

My customer input for the day :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
29 Posts
For the record -- i purchased a new Moment (2004) from my local dealer and it si doing the same thing -- scratching the hell out of my new seat post...

As for long distances for shipping etc... I live in Seattle...

Dealer is going to handle this one as I have neither the time or the patience to deal with solvent, files, compressed air etc --

I am somewhat relieved to hear that I am not the only one -- other than this mishap I love the ride... but filing my own frame is bs... isn't it? I paid $4400 -- this thing should clean itself :)
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
7,131 Posts
Trevor! said:
Cleaned inside and out?

Did you lightly sand the inside of the tubing - some frames require that. .
What, Huffys?

No wait, come to think of it I've never seen this problem on a huffy, and I work on quite a lot of them all day long.
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top