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wot no bike?
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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hey all -- just a quick post in case anyone's interested or needs some grinder motivation. I removed the brake bosses from the fork with a cutter, then grinded, sanded, primed and repainted them matte black. I think the black really pulled the front end together which is a good thing because I'm waiting on a black carbon fork. I'll post a review of that at some point too.

Bicycle tire Tire Wheel Bicycle wheel Bicycle wheel rim

Tire Wheel Wood Spoke Bicycle accessory

Tire Wheel Bicycle tire Wood Bicycle wheel rim


-pete
 

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very cool and thanks for the idea. I just got a used moncog and the fork were faulty and redline didn't have any matte green in stock so I think I will just paint them like you did. May I ask what kind of paint you used and did you prime the entire fork or just sand and paint? Looks cool. My monocog is not a 29er but oh well.
 

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wot no bike?
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks guys.

dmdeltesta: After getting rid of the bosses I sanded the entire fork (sans steerer tube of course), then applied a primer and after that dried, 2 coats of Rustoleum's "industrial" flat black. A few things to mention if you're going to do this:

1. I do not recommend Rustoleum. It doesn't seem to cure very well, despite the fact that I dried the fork under two 100W bulbs for a few days. In retrospect I've never had the greatest luck with that brand and seem to recall better results with Krylon and I think Dupont.

2. I would use the same brand for both primer and enamel to ensure best compatibility. Many thins coats are far better than few, thick coats, probably best to allow 48 hours between coats.

3. Use heat lamps or high wattage bulbs in a low humidity environment and bake the hell out of the fork for a few days, checking with a fingernail on the underside to see if it's cured.

4. Matt colors look cool but they definitely get marked-up easier, at least with home-application products. I would go with a gloss paint, and follow up with layers of clearcoat, again same brand as primer/enamel.

5. Follow the directions on the products, especially in regard to the application and dry times!

6. Don't re-install the fork until it's completely cured. No matter how careful you are you'll probably scratch it if you don't wait.

-pete
 

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donkey
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Ah, so many questions...
Did you rough up/ lightly sand the paint between coats, so that the subsequent coat would stick? Did you do this with the clear coat?
Are there metal specific primers and paints?
Is it possible to have too many coats of paint or clear coat?
I have a monocog, that will soon go dual disc and i'll be removing the brake bosses. If i respray the whole thing, should i strip all of the paint?
How would sandblasting/ bead blasting the whole bike and then clear coating it turn out -- advisable?

Good job, its one of the best looking monocogs I've seen. Although I may soon have one to challenge!
 

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wot no bike?
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
nbrennan:

I did not sand between the two coats I did, and I didn't use a clearcoat this time. There are definitely paints that are better suited for particular materials, but unfortunately I'm no expert in any of this. You should search this site and google for bicycle repainting techniques, there's a lot of good info to be found (I've started to look). If I were repainting my whole frame as you want to, I'd really research it more -- sorry I don't have any good answers for you. Good luck...
 
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