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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all,

I've been a mountain biker since 1981. I been riding the same bike since then!

I just purchased the above-referenced bike at SportsAuthority and find it to be most excellent. Yes, the bike was completely out of adjustment when purchased, but I am mechanically inclined and had no problems getting everything perfect.

The bike comes equipped with a 4 inch travel MOZO fork, Tekra Brakes and ALivio Rear Deraillur. The frame is Aluminum and very rigid. Also, the rear suspension spring is rated at 1200 pounds, so properly adjusted, there is vertually no BOB.

I have 90 days to try out the bike and return it if I don't like it. I have tried more expensive bikes at the local bike shop and feel no difference between the Mongoose and any SUB-$1500 FS Bike. I guess I just have a problem paying that much money just to have someone holding my hand.

Can anyone who is product knowledgeable on this forum give me some real advice on this bike so I can decide if it's a keeper??
 

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R.I.P. DogFriend
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You’ve got nerve, I’ll give you that. You insult everyone that paid more than you did for a bike with your ‘hand holding’ comment and then go fishing for compliments on your bike.

You got what you paid for. Maybe a little more than that seeing as how there are people that have paid more for that particular bike.

Enjoy it, since it’s probably more bike than you’ll ever need. Now don’t take this the wrong way either, but depending on the type riding you do, it may last you for twenty years or more just like your old bike did.

You know, some guys actually like cranky fat ugly women, some guys aren’t willing to do what it takes to attract women that aren’t and some just don’t know or appreciate the difference. Others certainly do. That’s the same reasoning that dictates why they make bikes that cost $79 and bikes that cost $5000 and lots of bikes in between.

If you really want it compared to a $1500 bike, just say the word.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
jeffj said:
You know, some guys actually like cranky fat ugly women, some guys aren't willing to do what it takes to attract women that aren't and some just don't know or appreciate the difference.
You are really showing your sensitive side Jeff. Women must be lining up for you just for the chance of getting insulted by you.

Anyway, enough time wasted on a guy who is only sensitive about his own feelings (he must have paid too much for his bike).

I'm simply looking at this from an engineering/materials point of view. Even Lexus thinks to only tach on $20K to the price of a $30K Sequoia and sells it as a LX470. How can we justify bike costing 5 to 15 times the price (yes they a little better but not 5 to 15 times better).

Forgive me for being a value conscience consumer.
 

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Well there's value consious and just cheap. What you have is just cheap. There, that's pretty straight forward. Not to rain on your money saving parade, but it sounds like you don't hit the trails all that much. Nothing wrong with the Alivio derailluer or tektro brakes but your Mozo fork and 1200lb rear shock(yeah right. like that's labeled correctly) aren't going to work like a shock ought to. With virtually no bob you probably have virtually no rebound adjustment either. Not too mention not much in the way of any sort of active rear suspension at all. In '81 you got a regular frame with some bigger tires and some small knobs. I'd guess you were overly impressed with what you bought, but not real knowledgeable about how it all works and why quality and function cost a bit of cash. A good rear shock along is worth more than 1/2 the cost of your *ahem* mtn. bike. As for not feeling the difference between yours and a sub $1500 lbs bike I'd guess you haven't had the chance to ride the more expensive bikes on some real bumpy trails, or for that matter long steep ones. Those tektros will give you a nice surprise if it ever gets damp.

Never the less good luck. It's not that I have tons of extra cash laying around, but I'd rather buy one bike to last 10 years and function like it's supposed to then 10 bikes in 10 years and be riding an I beam down the trail. Sorry.
 

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The Weatherman
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Cymm,

You sound pretty happy with your bike, and that's great. But quite honestly, a full suspension bike priced at 261 bucks is going to have some serious shortcomings. And I mean serious. This is provided you are going to actually take this bike on some real trails.

I am not the type of person to talk smack about other peoples bike. Heck, I think it's great just seeing people on a bike.

Having said that however, if you have 90 days to try that bike out, I would seriously consider using that 261 towards the purchase of a bike that has upgradable components on it. If you want to stay no-frills (meaning inexpensive) on your bike, I would definitely recommend you look at an entry level hardtail by any of the big chain bike companies: Trek, Giant, Specialized, Gary Fisher Etc. All of these companies will have solid bicycles at the price range you already paid for that Mongoose.

If you add about 40-100 on to that 261, you can get a bike that will really make you happy... and it will hold up to the test of time.

That Mongoose will not hold up... if you actually ride it with any regularity, and in a few months (if that) you will come to regret being thrifty on that purchase.

You don't have to spend 1500 dollars on a bike to get a good bike. You can spend what you already spent and get a fine hardtail. But a full-suspension at that price.... well, I will be honest... boat anchor.

But If you are having fun on that bike, don't let any of us dissuade you, ride the crap out of it and have fun.

Ride!

Pawn
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thank you FRED & PAWN for you insightful replies. I'm going to check out a LBS that carries Trek, Giant, Specialized and Gary Fisher. I'm not taking the TECH4 back just yet so I can better compare them.
 

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or if you seek that " value for your money" go buy a used full suspension. You'll find someone who has probably upgraded and just wants to unload a quality FS bike for a fraction of what they originally paid
 

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There's no app for this.
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Read the post

at the top: Dept Store bikes etc. It's there for a reason. If you value the unbiased opinion of Consumer's Report Mag, (and they do reference Mongoose bikes), your answer is there.\

Jim
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I stopped by my LBS and these caught my eye:

1) Full SUSPENSION: Giant Warp DS2 $479.95
Trek Y26 $329.95

2) HARDTAIL: TREK 4100 $269.95
Giant Boulder SE $269.95
Giant Iguana $499.95

Which do you guys think is the best value for the money? Thanks.
 

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The Weatherman
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cymmgarcia said:
I stopped by my LBS and these caught my eye:

1) Full SUSPENSION: Giant Warp DS2 $479.95
Trek Y26 $329.95

2) HARDTAIL: TREK 4100 $269.95
Giant Boulder SE $269.95
Giant Iguana $499.95

Which do you guys think is the best value for the money? Thanks.
All things being equal, if all those bikes are within your budget, I would buy the Iguana in a heartbeat.. provided I test-rode it and it felt nice to me. The Iguana is the best of all the ones you listed, and not just because it is the most expensive either. It has a solid frame, and a nice set of components as well. It is the most bang for your buck I think.

The Warp and Y26 would be fun bikes, but I don't think you get a really good deal on them in terms of longevity. Sure it will be nice to have that full suspension rig, but to get the bike full suspension they have to cut corners on other... more important things.. like drivetrain, wheels, etc. Both these bikes will be fun, but not value-packed like the hardtails.

As a one for one trade, I would ditch the Mongoose and pick up either the Trek 4100 or Boulder SE immediately. Both these bikes are solid entry level hard tails. I bought a Boulder SE for a friend of mine recently, and he loves it. I have a fondness for Giant bikes, even though I have never found one that fits me quite right.. I still like the company.

But again, if I had the expendable cash for any of those bikes you mentioned, I would trade in the Mongoose, and drop another 240 bones towards the purchase of that very sweet Iguana. That bike is really nice and you will be very happy in the long run.

The Picks (provided they fit you right)

#1 Iguana all the way!
#2 Boulder SE or Trek 4100
#3 Warp or Y26

Pawn
 

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R.I.P. DogFriend
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If you had not started with the insults yourself, you would have received a much different response from me.

From a materials / engineering viewpoint, if you are comparing your bike to a Toyota Sequoia, that is way off base. Thinking that because your bike has an aluminum frame and my bike has an aluminum frame makes them relatively equal is also flawed (to me). Thinking that because YOU can’t tell the difference between your Mongoose and a bike that cost $1500, that there must not be any difference is again flawed (to me). It’s more like comparing a Kia Sephia to a Chrysler 300M. To someone that feels like they are both automobiles will both transport two people from point A to point B, they are relatively equal and the Kia costs a lot less to do so (thereby making the 300M driver a fiscally foolish snob). But to a more discriminating driver, that is where the similarity ends. I’m not saying there is anything wrong with driving a Kia if that’s what you want to do and it fits your needs, but don’t expect a 300M driver to feel foolish for not buying the Kia.

I bought a car once for $50 and drove it for over a year. I have never purchased a new car. Until recently, I had never purchased a car newer than six years old and that cost more than $3,200. I have never had anyone do a brake job on my car or change my oil. I think I know the meaning of “value conscious”.

I first tried the “value conscious mountain biker” route by purchasing a “mountain bike” from Sears for $129. The only thing that did was to put me $129 further away from something that could even begin to be useful for the type of riding I wanted to do, let alone fit me correctly. I would call it an expensive lesson learned… to a certain extent anyways.

My next bike cost $325 ( 22” 1996 GT Outpost), it actually fit and was somewhat trail worthy. “Somewhat trail worthy” being the key phrase here: Between adding front suspension (along with a threadless stem), v-brakes (when they came out), tires that aren’t a compromise street/trail type, clipless pedals, a new rear wheel because the freewheel blew up and couldn’t be replaced, an LX crankset to replace the original that had a recall, I could have bought a bike originally that cost much less that was outfitted similarly. Each of these upgrades made small to significant improvements in how the bike performed for me on the type of trails I ride in the manner in which I wanted to ride.

So far, being value conscious for the type of mountain biking that I wanted to do was not paying off well. That’s why they make Kia’s and 300M’s and that’s why they make Mongoose’s and $1500 bikes.

My next bike, I spent $1850 on. I rode it (plenty hard) for five years without changing anything other than seat and handlebars and was very pleased with the way it rode. This past winter I gave it a pretty thorough makeover. With the new stable platform technology, it has been updated to current standards and I plan to ride it for another five years before making any more changes or looking for a new bike.

I would say that I am some where in the middle when it comes to how much money I have spent on my bikes for an average active cyclist. At this point in my life, I could spend more and I could buy any bike I want, but I feel safe and have the type of fun I want on my bike the way it is now. I still remain convinced that I paid what it costs to do so. I couldn’t do that on the $129 Sears bike and I couldn’t do that on the $325 bike either. YMMV.

On the other hand, last year, I bought three bikes for my family and another for myself. For my wife, I bought a bike for less than $350. She loves it, it fits her perfectly and it’s more bike than she’ll ever need for the type of riding she does. My daughter has stopped growing and rides the same types of trails I do. I paid $1200 for her full suspension bike and added a set of hydraulic disc brakes for another $200 ($1400 total). My son is still growing and rides many of the trails I do, but not quite all of them so I bought him a very suitable, but modestly priced hardtail that may now be familiar to you (Giant Iguana).

I also picked up a hybrid bike for myself on clearance for $299 (less than half of it’s original price). That’s less than $40 more than you paid for your bike, so I think I could consider myself value conscious when it comes to bikes as well. But I won’t be asking a roadie why they paid so much for his/her rig just to have their hand held since ours both have two wheels and an aluminum frame and since I know they are so similar from a materials / engineering viewpoint.

So, I have no problem with you or anyone else being a value conscious consumer. I consider myself one as well, but I did take issue with the tone and attitude of your original and subsequent post and responded in kind.

If you insult people, you risk being insulted in return.

If you are asking an honest question, be prepared for an honest answer.

If you want to hear better music, you have to pay the better piper.
 

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cymmgarcia said:
Hi all,

I've been a mountain biker since 1981. I been riding the same bike since then!

I just purchased the above-referenced bike at SportsAuthority and find it to be most excellent. Yes, the bike was completely out of adjustment when purchased, but I am mechanically inclined and had no problems getting everything perfect.

The bike comes equipped with a 4 inch travel MOZO fork, Tekra Brakes and ALivio Rear Deraillur. The frame is Aluminum and very rigid. Also, the rear suspension spring is rated at 1200 pounds, so properly adjusted, there is vertually no BOB.

I have 90 days to try out the bike and return it if I don't like it. I have tried more expensive bikes at the local bike shop and feel no difference between the Mongoose and any SUB-$1500 FS Bike. I guess I just have a problem paying that much money just to have someone holding my hand.

Can anyone who is product knowledgeable on this forum give me some real advice on this bike so I can decide if it's a keeper??
First of all, I don't mean to insult you, but your bike kinda sucks. $262 for a dual suspension bike just doesn't cut it. The Alivio you mention is a bottom of the line component compared to even an $1000 Dually. 1200 lbs huh? Don't ya think it's a bit much. No bob on climbs, but no travel downhill. Hell, ya might as well have bought a hardtail for what you paid. You would have alot better componentry and probly a better fork too. MOZO isn't so great compared to even RST. I bought a $450 hardtail and it came with a Deore rear, deore front and 8 speed gearing. Are you sure you've ridden those "SUB-$1500 FS bikes? Try this if it is in your price range. Go to trekbikes.com and look at the 4500. It isn't the fanciest, but it will get my point across. You compare componentry between your bike and the 4500 and you will soon realize your mistake. Then look at the $900 and above range and I guarantee that you will come to a very sudden realization of your mistake. Look at some other companies websites too and check what they have on their bikes.
 

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cymmgarcia said:
Hi all,

I've been a mountain biker since 1981. I been riding the same bike since then!

I just purchased the above-referenced bike at SportsAuthority and find it to be most excellent. Yes, the bike was completely out of adjustment when purchased, but I am mechanically inclined and had no problems getting everything perfect.

The bike comes equipped with a 4 inch travel MOZO fork, Tekra Brakes and ALivio Rear Deraillur. The frame is Aluminum and very rigid. Also, the rear suspension spring is rated at 1200 pounds, so properly adjusted, there is vertually no BOB.

I have 90 days to try out the bike and return it if I don't like it. I have tried more expensive bikes at the local bike shop and feel no difference between the Mongoose and any SUB-$1500 FS Bike. I guess I just have a problem paying that much money just to have someone holding my hand.

Can anyone who is product knowledgeable on this forum give me some real advice on this bike so I can decide if it's a keeper??
I dunno how much I could trust a fs bike that costs so little. however I also read how you checked out some other bikes by better brands which is very good. Go with one of those and return that mongoose for your own safety because I can guarantee you that if you do any hard riding, all those components will fall apart. Happy riding, man.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Mongoose Goes Back.....

I appreciate and want to thank everyone for taking their time to explain the issues to me. I've concluded that the Mongoose is slow and heavy. My budget being what it is (wife & 3 small kids) I believe my only recourse is a HardTail.

The manager friend at my local SportsAuthority will take the Mongoose back. He suggested I try out the GT Avalanche 3.0 which usually sells for $300 (He's giving me the same 60% off deal I got on the Mongoose so it'll be about $120). I know it's no Trek 4100 or Giant Boulder SE, but I wanted to see if you guys think it is a better choice given my limited funds.

Here's the URL:

http://www.gtbicycles.com/mountain/catalog/detail.php?id=3

Thanks for your support.
 

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cymmgarcia said:
even a slightly better "department store special" is still going to be pale in comparison to an entry level "real" bike.. so for that $150 or whatever find one that you like the feel of, ride the hell out of it, and then get a real bike next year when that one hass fallen apart or injured you after snapping in half ;)
 

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Now you're talkin!

cymmgarcia said:
I appreciate and want to thank everyone for taking their time to explain the issues to me. I've concluded that the Mongoose is slow and heavy. My budget being what it is (wife & 3 small kids) I believe my only recourse is a HardTail.

The manager friend at my local SportsAuthority will take the Mongoose back. He suggested I try out the GT Avalanche 3.0 which usually sells for $300 (He's giving me the same 60% off deal I got on the Mongoose so it'll be about $120). I know it's no Trek 4100 or Giant Boulder SE, but I wanted to see if you guys think it is a better choice given my limited funds.

Here's the URL:

http://www.gtbicycles.com/mountain/catalog/detail.php?id=3

Thanks for your support.
I wrote in before and let you know what I thought, and I still stand by that. However, the Avalanche 3.0 is a pretty solid bike. If you don't mind, could you please list the componentry in your next post. I'd like you to compare at least the fork,derailleurs and bike weight to these specs on the Trek 4500
Overall weight: 26lbs
Fork: RS Judy TT
F.Derailleur: Shimano Alivio
R.Derailleur: Shimano Deore :cool: for the the $450 pricetag
Brakes: Promax V-Brakes :cool:
Rims: Matrix 750
Tires: Bontrager ACX
Cassette: SRAM 850 8-speed
Crank: Shimano
Stem: Bontrager Sport
Handlebars: Bontrager Crowbar :cool:
Shifters: Alivio
Pedals: Alloy Platform
This bike is also disc compatible if you decide to go with disc brakes at some point. I wouldn't mention this except, this bike will actually still be in your possession and in good working order even if you keep it till you die. As long as you take it in for it's tuneups and stuff, I doubt you will ever want any more bike. I own a 4500, and while mine is actually decked out about like the Trek 8500 as far as componentry goes, it was still a 4500 at one point. For 2004 they switched the frame to the SuperLight Aluminum. My bike now weighs 18.5lbs. I realize your trying to be value conscious and probly won't spend to upgrade much, but you don't have to with this bike. Another good option is the Giant Iguana. It comes with disc brakes and fairly decent componentry. Good Luck
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Hi MIKEY,

Here are the specs:

Frame:
6061 Triple Triangle with Dirt Worthy Geometry, disc compatible with removeable hanger

Fork:
SR XC-60 75mm travel, one piece aluminum lowers, with disc mount and preload adjustment

Crankset:
Suntour XCC-100, 48,38,28

Bottom Bracket:
Cartridge Sealed

Pedals:
High Impact nylon ATB

Front Derailleur:
Shimano TY-32

Rear Derailleur:
Shimano Acera

Shifters:
Shimano ST-EF29

Cassette:
Shimano 7 Speed 14-28 HG

Cassette:
UG-50

Rims:
Alloy ATB

Tires:
Tioga Factory Extreme Front and Factory XC rear 26 x 1.95

Front Hub:
Alloy QR

Rear Hub:
Alloy QR

Spokes:
Stainless steel14 gauge

Nipples:
Brass CP

Front Brake:
Tektro Linear Pull

Rear Brake:
Tektro Linear Pull

Brake Levers:
Shimano ST-EF29

Handlebar:
20 mm Rise, 6 degree bend, anatomically sized

Stem:
GT ATB, threadless 25 degree rise with two bolt alum face plate

Grips:
GT ATB

Headset:
Aheadset Threadless

Saddle:
GT MTN

Seat Post:
Alloy Micro adjust

Seat Clamp:
GT Forged Alum QR

Color(s):
Black / GT Team silver, Team Blue / Storm Grey

Size(s):
S, M, L, XL,

***The Fork and Frame are Disc Ready

******Remember my price on this bike ($299 regular) will be about $120
 

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Componentry,Componentry,Componentry!!!!!!!!!

cymmgarcia said:
Hi MIKEY,

Here are the specs:

Frame:
6061 Triple Triangle with Dirt Worthy Geometry, disc compatible with removeable hanger

Fork:
SR XC-60 75mm travel, one piece aluminum lowers, with disc mount and preload adjustment

Crankset:
Suntour XCC-100, 48,38,28

Bottom Bracket:
Cartridge Sealed

Pedals:
High Impact nylon ATB

Front Derailleur:
Shimano TY-32

Rear Derailleur:
Shimano Acera

Shifters:
Shimano ST-EF29

Cassette:
Shimano 7 Speed 14-28 HG

Cassette:
UG-50

Rims:
Alloy ATB

Tires:
Tioga Factory Extreme Front and Factory XC rear 26 x 1.95

Front Hub:
Alloy QR

Rear Hub:
Alloy QR

Spokes:
Stainless steel14 gauge

Nipples:
Brass CP

Front Brake:
Tektro Linear Pull

Rear Brake:
Tektro Linear Pull

Brake Levers:
Shimano ST-EF29

Handlebar:
20 mm Rise, 6 degree bend, anatomically sized

Stem:
GT ATB, threadless 25 degree rise with two bolt alum face plate

Grips:
GT ATB

Headset:
Aheadset Threadless

Saddle:
GT MTN

Seat Post:
Alloy Micro adjust

Seat Clamp:
GT Forged Alum QR

Color(s):
Black / GT Team silver, Team Blue / Storm Grey

Size(s):
S, M, L, XL,

***The Fork and Frame are Disc Ready

******Remember my price on this bike ($299 regular) will be about $120
$120 sounds to be a pretty good deal, but like I said before your price is lower due to the lack of componentry. If this doesn't bother you, then buy the avalanche. The Acera R.derailleur isn't real bad, but it isn't real good either. If you truly believe this bike is for you, then I suggest you learn as much about bike mechanics as possible because you are going to need it. The avalanches componentry won't tolerate as much, and so won't last as long as what's on the 4500, or even the 4300. Oh well...... It's your choice man. If spending a lot of time on your bike is how you get your jollies, then you'll love the avalanche. There's nothing wrong with liking to work on your bike. I do too. The difference is that I do it for fun, not because I have to to keep my bike running right. If you don't plan on any real serious mountain biking, then go for the avalanche. If your looking for a bike that can "take a lickin, and keep on tickin" then go for a more expensive bike like the 4500 or the Giant Iguana. I am also 100% sure that the avalanche is a heavy beast compared to the 4500 or the Iguana. The 4500 has Trek's SuperLight frame for 2004 which makes a huge difference in bike weight. Good Luck choosing.
 
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