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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
It turns out that one source of the "dreaded creak" on my mojo seems to be my rear der. hanger. I've been through a couple of these, and finding the bolt a bit loose, tightened it up and the creak diminished a little bit--so I went to tighten it more--SNAP!

Looking at the bolt off my spare, it is pretty fragile, and am looking for advice on torque, and given the torque limitations, strategies for getting the whole thing tight enough to shut it up.


I also have a bit of a ding on the very back lower end of the right drop-out--a surface that touches the hanger, which got me wondering how that might contribute to any creaking (it also made me wonder about all the advice that I've read on getting paint off of mated surfaces to stop creaks, being that the drop-out and hanger are coated).
 

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This is a very common creak due to a loose rear axle.

The bolt that holds the hanger on is just to hold it in position when the wheel is off. The wheel's axle is what tightens it.

You need to tighten you axle more, which may mean going to a bolt-on axle or better quick release. DT Swiss makes a ratcheting quick release that can be tightened more than any other. Shimano quick releases have the best design otherwise. The simple cam operated quick releases have much friction and must be adjusted to be nearly impossible to tighten completely and release to be tight enough to avoid creaking.

Use only a very light twist of your wrist, maybe 13 inch/lbs to tighten the hanger bolt.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
bolt-ons

Thanks Derby, that helps me make sense of things (and I just happen to have some control tech bolt-on skewers on the way).

So I have had a couple creaks - one with pedal downstrokes uphill, and one when braking with the rear (xtr disc). If I get off the bike and lock up the rear brake, and rocked the bike forward and back it would really creak (but a bit different sound than the pedaling creak). The brake creak went away after messing with the hanger, but the pedal creak remains (?!)

I've tightened my rear quick release, but not guerrilla-tight yet, does surface-prep (e.g. paint) matter? Other things to attend to if this is the source?

thanks again...
 

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If you haven't found this info yet, make sure to always check cable ferules when you have a creak. 90% of my creaks in the last 2 years on the Mojo ended up being traced to ferrules twisting and grinding dirt in the cable stops. The noise is variable, but can be quite loud and sound like it is coming from anywhere since it is amplified in the carbon frame.
 

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Mojo creaks

I just put one together a few weeks ago and had a few creak issues. Check the seat post and retorque seat and post. Also retorque the headset. My last creak was the headset spacers. It is really hard to pinpoint the noise since it seems to reverberate through the frame.
 

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sangmatt said:
Thanks Derby, that helps me make sense of things (and I just happen to have some control tech bolt-on skewers on the way).

So I have had a couple creaks - one with pedal downstrokes uphill, and one when braking with the rear (xtr disc). If I get off the bike and lock up the rear brake, and rocked the bike forward and back it would really creak (but a bit different sound than the pedaling creak). The brake creak went away after messing with the hanger, but the pedal creak remains (?!)

I've tightened my rear quick release, but not guerrilla-tight yet, does surface-prep (e.g. paint) matter? Other things to attend to if this is the source?

thanks again...
My Mojo (06M0078) turned 2 years old this month. It's the quietest most creak free full suspension bike I've owned in 12 years and 5 FS bikes. My metal FS bikes were much more creaky, having more metal to metal rubbing opportunities.

So many things can creak it's rare to diagnose easily without spending some time on the bike. Like NoShortCuts mentioned cable end ferrules are very often the source of creaks. Check your ring bolts tightness, and tightness of the stem - stems with a single bolt at the bar clamp will creak no matter how tight, shock mount bolts, dry pedal seals sometimes creak rather than squeak, seat posts and seat rails are notorious creekers.

A way to find some creaks is to spray or drip some water on specific areas of the bike, isolating one area at a time with the water and ride it. If the creak suddenly quiets the water has temporarily lubed the rubbing points and the creak will probably return quickly when the water dries out. Then cleaning up or realigning and possibly lubing the area can quiet it permanently.

The rear axle mating surface area like paint is slippery and could creak easier compared to a more rough finish like bare aluminum. You could try rough sanding the paint behind the axle bolts.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I know the usual suspects and have been working on them...I like the water trick, which is a nice diagnostic tool to use while out on a ride. I'll give it a try
 

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sangmatt, what hubs are you using?

I switched from some xt hubs to dt 240's and very quickly started to get some major creaking in the rear drive side. I tried a bunch of things, and finally found a solution. The creaking was coming from the interface between the knurling on the hub axle and the inside of the frame dropout. Usually, the creaking would go away for a short time (10-30min) after really tightening the skewer. (like derby suggested) I think that once the knurling seats into the frame, it starts creaking. The dt hubs seem to have some of the deepest knurling of any hubs that I've seen. Another symptom is that it creaked much more in low gears.

My solution was fairly simple. I used a very very thin washer that just fit over the hub axle and covered the knurling on the hub. The knurling bites into the washer first and then the inside of frame dropout. I think that just the material change and/or the reduction in depth of knurling solved it for me. Still with a tight skewer, this stopped my problem completely. No creaking for about a month now. Zero issues with slippage, and it works great!

--MXFanatic
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
washer

I'm on xtr hubs with the same basic symptoms. I've had thoughts along these lines (but haven't mustered an actual plan). Thanks for another possibility, I've got just the right washers to try.
 
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