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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What's the limit of this frames ability and how durable is it? I know it's light and climbs superbly. But how about the rough stuff? I'm not planning to huck it or win any DH races. But it will see light FR and DH routinely. Can the frame handle that? Thanks.
 

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I don't think that just because someone is doing it that makes it ideal for that purpose. You will surely have more enjoyment out of your hard-earned money by choosing the right tool for the job, in terms of strength, as well as suspension performance for the application. Getting banged up and scratched is part of the game in FR and DH. Pick right and you'll be safe. Don't go off pictures of the manufacturer's test rider hitting the extreme ends of the capability.

I would shy away from using a Mojo if you're going to be doing DH and FR with it.
 

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My 6month old Mojo has 6000 kms on it and holding it own very well. I DH and FR and it has no problems at all. Cox Hill, Jewel Pass, Baldy Pass, Fording River Pass, are some of the trails I ride all the time, and it takes a beating! 95% of the kms are on steep technical rocky trails! It actually seems to ride on these trails like it was made for them. The more technical, the faster it seems to go. I have set best times on all these tails with it.
I'd recommend it to anyone!
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I agree

Jerk_Chicken said:
I don't think that just because someone is doing it that makes it ideal for that purpose. You will surely have more enjoyment out of your hard-earned money by choosing the right tool for the job, in terms of strength, as well as suspension performance for the application. Getting banged up and scratched is part of the game in FR and DH. Pick right and you'll be safe. Don't go off pictures of the manufacturer's test rider hitting the extreme ends of the capability.

I would shy away from using a Mojo if you're going to be doing DH and FR with it.
I agree with you. I would use it as an aggressive all mountain bike. It would not be used for the big stuff.
 

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I go out of my way on the downhills to find the roughest off line rocky drops and launches, cliff bank turns, etc. It’s like surfing or knee-deep-go-anywhere powder skiing. With a 140mm travel fork the handing is perfect for lower to mid speed very rough downhill. I’m keeping my eye out for a good condition used Lyric u-turn coil to run mostly at 140mm and occasionally wind up to 160mm for higher speed DH and unknown extreme steeps.

Durability? Hans of Ibis has posted that the Mojo has been control tested to be “as strong as a Nomad or Heckler in the small and medium sizes and as strong as a VPFree in the large and extra-large sizes”. There are riders who have extreme trail and jump tested it and confirmed the Mojo’s extreme AM and Freeride durability. 160mm travel 36mm forks are an Ibis Mojo factory build option.

The Mojo won’t dent, bend, or deeply scratch as easily from a crash as a 3 or 4 pound heavier aluminum Nomad or VPFree or similar use aluminum bikes. You are more likely to be able to ride a Mojo away after a bad crash than other AM bikes.

Sure there are a few riders who have damaged a Mojo. And if you manage somehow to seriously damage your’s there is no better customer service than Ibis now. There has been a very low manufacturing defect rate from the start of Mojo production runs 2 years ago. And Ibis is extremely quick in correspondence and rapid in response world wide to supply replacement parts for warrantee or crash damage at a low cost.

You deserve the most versatile and best-designed trail bike in the world, so order your Mojo now.

(This commercial was sponsored by one very happy 16 month Mojo customer!)
 

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I go out of my way on the downhills to find the roughest off line rocky drops and launches, cliff bank turns, etc. It's like surfing or knee-deep-go-anywhere powder skiing. With a 140mm travel fork the handing is perfect for lower to mid speed very rough downhill. I'm keeping my eye out for a good condition used Lyric u-turn coil to run mostly at 140mm and occasionally wind up to 160mm for higher speed DH and unknown extreme steeps.

Durability? Hans of Ibis has posted that the Mojo has been control tested to be "as strong as a Nomad or Heckler in the small and medium sizes and as strong as a VPFree in the large and extra-large sizes". There are riders who have extreme trail and jump tested it and confirmed the Mojo's extreme AM and Freeride durability. 160mm travel 36mm forks are an Ibis Mojo factory build option.

The Mojo won't dent, bend, or deeply scratch as easily from a crash as a 3 or 4 pound heavier aluminum Nomad or VPFree or similar use aluminum bikes. You are more likely to be able to ride a Mojo away after a bad crash than other AM bikes.

Sure there are a few riders who have damaged a Mojo. And if you manage somehow to seriously damage your's there is no better customer service than Ibis now. There has been a very low manufacturing defect rate from the start of Mojo production runs 2 years ago. And Ibis is extremely quick in correspondence and rapid in response world wide to supply replacement parts for warrantee or crash damage at a low cost.

You deserve the most versatile and best-designed trail bike in the world, so order your Mojo now.

(This commercial was sponsored by one very happy 16 month Mojo customer!)
Good writeout, you can really be a Ibis Mojo promoter :D
 

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Baysh said:
I agree with you. I would use it as an aggressive all mountain bike. It would not be used for the big stuff.
If it helps: I used to have a Turner 5-spot and the Mojo is more capable downhill, the suspension works wonderfully in the fast and rough and the frame goes as straight as an arrow. It is the perfect bike for aggressive all mountain :thumbsup:
 

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wheelhot said:
Good writeout, you can really be a Ibis Mojo promoter :D
Thanks! I may over promote the Mojo for AM uses partly because as a private owner I'm amazed I'm not seeing durability issues or any repeating issues at all. (No double-butt stress fractures here!)

Ibis doesn't like to see the very rare "broken swingarm" or "rock damage" posts, but that's what we come here to MTBR to research. They will get over it and should be proud now that there are only a very rare few damage reports posted here, unlike what happens for manufacturers with repeating durability issues.

The lack of repeated damage reports is very encouraging to me to promote Ibis even more as a happy customer, since I bought an early production based only on the superb design factors and my trust of the people of Ibis (I usually don't buy early production, to wait to see if there are early issues to be fixed.)
 

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Hmm, although I haven own a Mojo, I would glad to support their products, so far I've been lurking around this Ibis Manufacturer Forum the most compared to others. And Im glad to see that the issue that people say such as broken swingarm or something else, usually is just cosmetic.

I think the Mojo would be fine as a AM bike. Hmm, maybe Ibis should add some category for their components spec. Such as the WTF group will suit Aggresive XC Riders and so on.
 

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I have taken my Mojo all over the place from NC to the UP of MI and to CO and NV to WV. I have taken it over everything I would on any other bike. 3 foot to about 6 foot drops and jumps, with no problems. The only thing messed up on the frame is how easy it scuffs up from cable rub. I had to put frame tape all over the thing and wrap up the chain stay with special tape because I could not find any protectors to work. I am worried about riding in cold weather and am going to start a thread asking about that.
 
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