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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
This post is one in a series of twelve posts depcting the build of my Hollowpoint MkIII.
Link to MkIII / Speedhub bike build post.

Felco vs. Pedro's vs. Park?

Dremel trumps 'em all. (Hey, I'm entitled to my 2 cents, aren't I?!?)

My Avid mechs have been squeezed by riders from around the globe, and they all say "my, ain't that the smoothest..."

Combine with "generic" Jagwire housing (sold under the QBP brand) and drilled-out cable stops for a full-length run, and you'll have yourself a disposable cable setup that rivals expensive systems from Avid, Nokon and others.

Cut the housing to the approximate length using whatever cable cutters you have handy. Ewww, that's a crappy cut!



Strap on the goggles, whip out the Dremel and a #456 reinforced cut-off disc and go to town.

Make the cut quickly and decisively -- cutting slowly builds heat, melting the inner lining and damaging the outer sheath.

You can use the non-reinforced disc that come with many Dremel kits, but be warned that they shatter easily. Eye protection is a must.



You're left with a nearly perfect looking cut with fringes on the outside and a shrunken inner liner.



With snips or *****, trim the fringe from around the exterior to ensure a solid bead seat.

Use an awl or a scribe to pierce the inner lining and flute it open. Wait for the lining to cool, otherwise it'll just mush around.



Perfecto! Run a piece of cable through the end to check that nothing is plugged up.



As a coup de gras, spray dry lubricant through one end until it spits out the other. This will give you a little extra slickness without an oily coating to attract dirt.

Here I use Pyroil Silicone Spray Lubricant, but other dry sprays such as or [url=https://www.888teammclube.com/frames/sailkote/]McLube SailKote will do equally well.



]As a finishing touch, give the heat shrink treatment to the cut cable end. It's a great alternative to crimping a cable end cap on, it'll stay put, but will easily come off with a firm tug if you need to re-pull the cable.



I find that 1/16" fits great on 1.1 & 1.2mm derailleur cable, and 3/32" is perfect for 1.5mm brake cable.

The 3/32" tubing can be difficult to find. The skinnier 1/16" tubing is available at Radio Shack and fits over 1.5mm brake cables, but will split during the shrinking process if overheated.



You don't need a heat gun -- a lighter or a match will do the trick.



Tidy looking installation.



Index of MkIII Build Posts


MAIN: MkIII / Speedhub Build Pics

Iron Horse MkIII Naked Frame (March 2005)

Hollowpoint Speedhub Build Pictures (April 2003)

Cane Creek AD-12 Air Chamber Volume Adjustment

White Brothers 2006 Technology


White Brothers DT 1.2 Fork Porn

Stripping Anodization

Bottom Bracket Drain Hole Drilling & Installation

Drilling Out Cable Stops (Full Length Cable Run)

Dremel Cut & Prep of Cable & Housing
Hopey Steering Damper Installation

Stripping & Polishing an Aluminum Frame

Homemade Headset Removal & Installation Tools

Star Fangled Nut Removal (Drilling out the Star Nut)
 

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Speedub.Nate said:
Make the cut quickly and decisively -- cutting slowly builds heat, melting the inner lining and damaging the outer sheth.
Thanks for posting this. I'll have to give the dremel another try. (My mistake was going too slowly.)

The heat shrink tubing on the ends of the cables is a nice touch too. I'll have to try that as well.
 

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I would also (humbly) suggest the use of "round" needle file to clean-out the inner housing. The awl/scribe works well if the liner is still warm (not hot), but doesn't get everything clean if it is cold or still has rough edges. By inserting the tip of the round file and rotating, it cleans ALL the debris out and ensures nothing will drag on the cable.

Good call on the shrink tubing..........I like it!!! :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Steve F said:
I would also (humbly) suggest the use of "round" needle file to clean-out the inner housing. The awl/scribe works well if the liner is still warm (not hot), but doesn't get everything clean if it is cold or still has rough edges. By inserting the tip of the round file and rotating, it cleans ALL the debris out and ensures nothing will drag on the cable.

Good call on the shrink tubing..........I like it!!! :)
I'd never heard of a needle file, so did a quick Google search to see what you're talking about. Looks like an interesting solution.

https://www.radioshack.com/product.asp?catalog_name=CTLG&category_name=&product_id=64-2964&hp=search



...except for this warning, "Always use a tool for its intended purpose." :D

To be honest, I've never had a problem with a scribe or an awl (except for when I tried it immediately after cutting, when the liner was still molten), but I gotta say that this needle file looks like the perfect finishing touch. I'll be sure to pick one up. Thanks!

And yeah, I love the heat shrink tubing. I think it's one of the more elegant ways to restrain a cut cable end from fraying, and with less hassle than the solder or crazy glue methods.
 

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http://www.titantoolsupply.com/dnf.html

Most decent tool supply companies carry them, and quite often they come in sets of differnent shapes (profiles). Quite often when you need to do a little touch-up they come in real handy. Every home mechanic needs them......trust me!

The link above shows a typical set. You will note the round file is only around 1/8" dimamer, but the tip goes right down to a fine point. This is the one I use on housings.

One word of warning though. Files are made from hardened steel, and therefore are quite brittle. I found out the hard way, they make lousy levers :rolleyes:
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
Speedub.Nate said:
I gotta say that this needle file looks like the perfect finishing touch. I'll be sure to pick one up. Thanks!
Ok, so I picked up the $8 needle file set at Radio Shack on Friday (Radio Shack employee: "What kind of needles are you going to file?") and re-cabled my wife's Mount Vision this past weekend.



I'm not so sure it's the "killer finish" I thought it might be, but it could still be of some value.

The tip is pretty blunt, so I still used my scribe (fine point) or awl to flute open the inner liner. (BTW, the scribe, as pictured, has a bit of a tweeked tip, due to me picking & prying at something or other a while back that caused it to bend. It still works for opening up housing, but serves a reminder to treat sharp, pointy tools with respect.)

The needle file, as tiny as it is, is a little broader and a touch coarser than I figured it'd be. I couldn't really run it in and out in a normal filing motion, so had to twist it in like a screw or a drill bit. Thing is, the file has sort of a threaded pattern to it, so twisting in only one direction will cause it to thread in. It takes small turns back and forth to remove the right amount of material and carry it out (I pulled out small bits of plastic trapped in the teeth).

In any case, I'm not sure the needle file alone would cut it, but removing most of the liner material right at the tip shouldn't hurt anything, but could certainly help under the right circumstances. I not at the point of considering the needle file a necessity, but I'll continue to use it on future installations now that I have one to use.

 

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If the file builds up plastic or other debris you can remove it with a brass brush.

You can usually get a set of various shaped needle files cheap at harbor freight or a much more expensive set at Sears (or you can shop smart shop S-mart if you have a K-mart selling Craftsman). They are good for fine work like model building but the inside of a cable housing is pretty small.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
archer said:
If the file builds up plastic or other debris you can remove it with a brass brush.
I think you're reading me wrong -- what I was trying to write is that I know the file is working to "clean out" the inside of the inner liner since I see material being removed.

Little chunks of plasticey liner material don't pose a challenge to remove from a file.

The Radio Shack set that I bought, BTW, comes with files files of various shapes. Part #64-2977.

 

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Discussion Starter · #9 · (Edited)
Quick update:

In an effort to make this Dremel prep "portable" -- no cord, no AC outlet necessary -- I chased down a newer model cordless Dremel on eBay. I finally had a chance to use it this weekend, and it went splendidly!

The Dremel is their current 10.8v Lithium-Ion powered unit. Max RPM is 35,000. The Li-Ion batteries have a long shelf life between charges. This one has been out of the charger, stored in my tool box for at least six weeks, and it ran strong.

With the same reinforced cut-off disk (#456) I use with the corded model, the cordless cut just through housing quickly and cleanly.



For the heat shrink on the cable end, I left the heat gun alone and used a BernzOMatic grill lighter ($8 at the hardware store). It's got a pressurized, wind-proof flame and does a quick job without buring the tubing. Any windproof lighter should be equally suitable, but I've also used kitchen matches to put the finishing touch on heat shrink.





This is great for taking this all on the road, maybe fix up your buddy's bike at the trailhead, or to simply skip the hassle of plugging a bunch of junk in, which truly makes this a quick, minimal-hassle task.
 

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A really quick way of dealing with the melted inner liner is to have the inner brake cable already pushed most of the way through the outer casing before grinding (I use a bench grinder) and as soon as the grinding is over (while the liner is still soft) push the inner wire through and push it back & forth a couple of times. Cost - nothing. Speed - immediate.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Mike T. said:
No outer casing I've ever used (generic spiral wound stuff) has ever had a removable liner.
I have... and it sucked. Rohloff provides a lining with removeable liner with their Speedhub kits. The liner kinks easily, and the hub shifting is especially sensitive to friction. So I put it where it belongs -- in the trash can -- and use sprial wound QBP brake cable housing instead.
 

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rob.char said:
Anyone recommmend using the Silicone spray on xtr brake cables/housing? Also using speed dial 7 levers and 2009 bb7
Living and riding in a dry dusty environment, I'm suspicious of any lube which might attract and retain dust. All of my attempts to rehabilitate gummed up housing with any sort of lube has failed. I end up just having to replace the housing.

That said, on my last few housing replacements, I've been using a product called Dri-Slide in my housing. I can't say whether it's more effective than going with dry housing, but it's certainly no worse.

More effective are measures which prevent dust from entering in the first place. Continuous / uninterrupted housing runs are good. The rubber boots or seals that the housing exits from on Avid BB7s are also good. Older Shimano rear derailleurs had similar rubber boots, but recent year derailleur models seems to have dispensed with them. (This was a very bad move, IMO.)

On these newer derailleurs, I've had good luck with a modified Shimano Sealed End Cap. Not much modification is required; I simply shorten the tube coming off the end cap a little bit and make a corresponding adjustment to the shield. Unfortunately, use of these end caps necessitates the use of 4mm housing.

But I digress... with regard to your question, I think that uninterrupted XTR housing for your BB7 brake lines will be fine. Whether to use silicone spray or not is up to you. It won't harm the housing liner, and it probably won't attract much dust due to the fact that the system is pretty well sealed up due to the uninterrupted housing and the rubber boot at the brake end. I'm not convinced, however, that using the lube will significantly affect your braking performance one way or the other.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
I've never had too much luck with the sealed end caps. It always seems that the tiny rubber O-rings which seal the exit port result in too much friction. Maybe it's due to the particular brand (usually Jagwire; not sure I've used Shimano's version).

On the other hand, I've had lots of good results with dry lubes: Pyroil Silicone Spray Lubrican from the auto parts store, and Boeshield T9 aerosol. SRAM recommended a product called McLube SailKote some years ago; I never got around to trying it, but supposedly it is quite good.
 

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I've had lots of good results with dry lubes: Pyroil Silicone Spray Lubrican from the auto parts store said:
I went to the autozone down the street and all they had was Liquid wrench, heavy duty silicone spray lubricant I really don't think its any different than the others listed. What do you think?
 
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