Mountain Bike Reviews Forum banner
1 - 20 of 52 Posts

·
Pivoteer
Joined
·
3,445 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Guys,

Hoping to get some feedback. I have been running DHFs forever. I run a 2.35 42a/60 on the 5 Spot and a 2.7 3C/2.5 60a on my Highline. I recently purchased a new 2.5 for the rear, and now I am considering a 2.5 3C for the front. My thought is that the 2.5 has a tighter tread pattern, better supported side knobs (not that I have that issue with the 2.7), and in theory should shred better due to the above comments.

I have always subscribed to a larger front tire, but when looking at the dead spot between the center knobs and the side on the 2.7, I seem to think that the 2.5 will have less "float" gettng to the side knobs. BTW I am running Mavic 823s.

So, before I spent a bunch of money on a new tire, I would appreciate some feedback. 2.5, or should I stick with what I know and buy a 2.7?

Thanks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
230 Posts
Keep in mind that Minions, relative to other companies' DH tires, are a size smaller than the nominal size. In other words, a 2.7" Minion has the same width and weight as a 2.5" tire from Kenda, WTB, Intense, etc. (Actually, the 2.7" Minion is slightly narrower and lighter than many 2.5" tires, in my experience.)

It may seem difficult to accept a 2.7" tire, but a (claimed) 1390 g tire with 59 mm casing width is what it is, regardless of whether the sidewall says 2.5" or 2.7". For comparison, Maxxis claims the 2.5" Minion measures 55 mm at the casing.

I'm usually happy with a combination of 2.7" front and 2.5" rear when using Maxxis tires, though I'll mount a 2.5" on the front for smooth or less challenging trails. I've never had problems with the gap between the centre and side lugs on the 2.7".

My feeling is that very few people are so skilled on a bike that weight and rolling resistance are more important factors than traction and control. If I can get more traction, control, and comfort from a larger tire at slightly lower pressure, then I'll have more fun and ride faster for it. For what it's worth, I run 140 g cross-country tubes to offset the mass of burly tires.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
230 Posts
pmrider said:
I would say 2.5 unless you need more of a meatball
That's a perfectly valid suggestion, but here's my point, phrased another way:

Most people recommend the 2.5" Minion. The same people usually recommend a 2.5" Intense, Michelin, WTB, Kenda, Specialized, etc. You rarely see a recommendation for a 2.35" tire for true downhill applications, yet the 2.5" Minion (or High Roller) is the same size and weight as a 2.35" in another brand. Therefore, suggesting a 2.5" Minion is essentially the same as suggesting a 2.35" in any other brand.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
612 Posts
R-M-R said:
Keep in mind that Minions, relative to other companies' DH tires, are a size smaller than the nominal size. In other words, a 2.7" Minion has the same width and weight as a 2.5" tire from Kenda, WTB, Intense, etc. (Actually, the 2.7" Minion is slightly narrower and lighter than many 2.5" tires, in my experience.)

It may seem difficult to accept a 2.7" tire, but a (claimed) 1390 g tire with 59 mm casing width is what it is, regardless of whether the sidewall says 2.5" or 2.7". For comparison, Maxxis claims the 2.5" Minion measures 55 mm at the casing.

I'm usually happy with a combination of 2.7" front and 2.5" rear when using Maxxis tires, though I'll mount a 2.5" on the front for smooth or less challenging trails. I've never had problems with the gap between the centre and side lugs on the 2.7".

My feeling is that very few people are so skilled on a bike that weight and rolling resistance are more important factors than traction and control. If I can get more traction, control, and comfort from a larger tire at slightly lower pressure, then I'll have more fun and ride faster for it. For what it's worth, I run 140 g cross-country tubes to offset the mass of burly tires.
Very true, DHFs seem pretty small for the claimed size. I went from a 2.5 DHF to a 2.7 this year and there is a noticeable increase in traction. If you haven't had a problem with your current setup, I wouldn't change to a smaller tire to solve a problem that doesn't exist :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
706 Posts
R-M-R said:
That's a perfectly valid suggestion, but here's my point, phrased another way:

Most people recommend the 2.5" Minion. The same people usually recommend a 2.5" Intense, Michelin, WTB, Kenda, Specialized, etc. You rarely see a recommendation for a 2.35" tire for true downhill applications, yet the 2.5" Minion (or High Roller) is the same size and weight as a 2.35" in another brand. Therefore, suggesting a 2.5" Minion is essentially the same as suggesting a 2.35" in any other brand.
Uhhhh no. Without bringing the casing construction/thickness into the equation your comparison is completely pointless.

Go with a 2.5"
2.7" in a DHF is WAY overkill.

Also: everyone should just quit with the nonsense about Maxxis running small. I mounted a 2.5 Minion and a 2.5 Nevegal on EX823s and measured them knob to knob with digital calipers. The Minion was 2.48 and the Nevegal was 2.49. There are obviously going to be batch differences but it's an illusion for god's sake. Quit making it a deciding factor in tire purchases.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
230 Posts
Mr. Blonde said:
Uhhhh no. Without bringing the casing construction/thickness into the equation your comparison is completely pointless.

Go with a 2.5"
2.7" in a DHF is WAY overkill.

Also: everyone should just quit with the nonsense about Maxxis running small. I mounted a 2.5 Minion and a 2.5 Nevegal on EX823s and measured them knob to knob with digital calipers. The Minion was 2.48 and the Nevegal was 2.49. There are obviously going to be batch differences but it's an illusion for god's sake. Quit making it a deciding factor in tire purchases.
Okay, I'll bring casing construction/thickness into the equation.

A Maxxis 2.7" DH tire with 2 plys of 60 tpi casing is the same size and weight as a 2.5" Kenda DH tire with 2 plys of 60 tpi casing. A Maxxis 2.7" DH tire with 2 plys of 60 tpi casing is also the same size and weight as a 2.5" WTB DH tire with 2 plys of 30 tpi casing.

Repeat as necessary for other brands' 2.5" DH tires.

There is no universal standard for tire measurement and labeling. WTB attempted to standardize things with their GMS - an excellent approach, by the way - but it didn't really catch on. Without a standard, companies can scribble any size they like on the side of their tires. This has been a problem with road tires for decades, where companies claim a tire is wider than it really is as a way to artificially claim to have made a lighter tire. Similarly, Maxxis, IRC, and Continental used to be famous for wildly exaggerating the width of their tires. Many new Maxxis tires - the Ardent, for one example - are reversing this trend, but the Minion and High Roller are holdovers from Maxxis' era of exaggeration.

Now that we've put some facts to the argument, can we please resume calling the Minion and High Roller mislabeled?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
230 Posts
dogonfr said:
So the reason why Maxis tires win championships is because their tires actually work and not because of a number. :thumbsup:
It's true, the laws of physics take very little interest in the numbers and logos on the sidewalls of our tires.

It's also true that the world's top riders are more skilled than the rest of us at playing with the laws of physics, which is why I recommend the rest of us use more powerful tools, such as fat tires.

For most riders, a 2.5" Minion is an excellent choice...but a 2.7" Minion may be an even better choice. It's never necessary - it may not even be the better choice - but it's not as radical a suggestion as the "2.7"" designation makes it seem.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
230 Posts
dogonfr said:
Funny It was suggested to me by a pro rider 2.35 rear and 2.5 front.
If the pro was referring to any brand other than Maxxis, then this suggestion is equivalent to a 2.7" F, 2.5" R set-up on Minions or High Rollers and is common for non-Maxxis riders. If it referred to Minions or High Rollers, then that's a less common set-up, but would make sense for a smooth or non-technical course.

dogonfr said:
So why do pros black out the words Maxxis on their tires?
People say money makes the world go 'round, but the laws of physics take the expression rather more literally. The logos say (or don't say) whatever is necessary to satisfy the former, but the tire itself is chosen to appease the latter.
 

·
ride hard take risks
Joined
·
25,423 Posts
R-M-R said:
If the pro was referring to any brand other than Maxxis, then this suggestion is equivalent to a 2.7" F, 2.5" R set-up on Minions or High Rollers and is common for non-Maxxis riders. If it referred to Minions or High Rollers, then that's a less common set-up, but would make sense for a smooth or non-technical course.

People say money makes the world go 'round, but the laws of physics take the expression rather more literally. The logos say (or don't say) whatever is necessary to satisfy the former, but the tire itself is chosen to appease the latter.
Depends on terrain, conditions & rider needs. :thumbsup:

Sharpie makes the world go around. :thumbsup:
 

·
BrassBalled DropbarNinja
Joined
·
11,813 Posts
R-M-R said:
If the pro was referring to any brand other than Maxxis, then this suggestion is equivalent to a 2.7" F, 2.5" R set-up on Minions or High Rollers and is common for non-Maxxis riders. If it referred to Minions or High Rollers, then that's a less common set-up, but would make sense for a smooth or non-technical course.

People say money makes the world go 'round, but the laws of physics take the expression rather more literally. The logos say (or don't say) whatever is necessary to satisfy the former, but the tire itself is chosen to appease the latter.
I think you need to read those replies again...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
664 Posts
If you have two tires - same tread pattern and tire pressure; the only difference being the width:

The larger tire will give you more grip on hard surfaces due to increased area that friction is being applied to. However, because you've increased weight dispersion, on softer surfaces you'll get less traction. For example - on wet surfaces it will be easier to hydroplane.

So, the smaller tire will tend to give you more grip on soft surfaces. The larger tire will give you more grip on hard surfaces.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
230 Posts
mrpercussive said:
I think you need to read those replies again...
Or you could stop being coy and explain what you mean.

I do see Mr. Blonde's claim to have measured a 2.5" Minion and 2.5" Nevegal and found the widths to be similar, but that's somewhat misleading: The Minion has a much smaller volume and the Nevegal's side knobs don't hang especially far off the edge of the casing. Also, those measurements disagree with my own experience, but I'll take his word for those being the numbers produced by his own equipment. dogonfr's measurement of a 2.5" Minion and 2.5" WTB Dissent is more typical.

If we want to get back to the thread starter's questions, then I'll reiterate my points and add a couple new ones:

1. I don't find the 2.7" Minion has excessive drift between the centre and side knobs. If tiSS'er feels it does, then the 2.5" won't be dramatically different, if at all. Instead, he could consider an Intense Invader (formerly "DH") or 909, Kenda Excavator, or WTB Prowler MX.

2. I don't find the 2.5" Minion has better side knob support than the 2.7". The 3C compound addresses that issue very well.

3. For most full-on DH trails, I prefer a 2.7" Minion on the front, though I use a 2.5" on the front for less burly trails.
 
1 - 20 of 52 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top