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Discussion Starter #361


I think that fork will be short by 30mm of the original forks A to C. A bit too much IMHO. The headset will work but for a few bucks more you can get something a little better...and to your door sooner depending on your location. (Origin8, FSA, Ritchey, etc....)
 

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My Trek 930 commuter

I'm loving this thread and it inspired me to register and show my own Trek 930 in green & purple fade:
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This is my 1995 (?) Trek 930 that I built up as a daily commuter (6 miles each way). Highlights: Sanyo dynamo hub and B&M dynamo light system, Schwable Marathon Supreme 2" tires, Soma Clarence sweep back handlebars, Crank Brothers Candy pedals, Planet Bike fenders, Ergon cork grips. Original derailleurs, headset, rear wheel and seat post; all other components are replacements.

For a relatively short commute, I don't think there's a better bike for the job.
 

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I recently purchased the same bars for my 92 Trek 950. They will go on once I am recovered from a wrist injury.

Good looking bike.
Get well soon and enjoy! One thing to be aware of: since the Clarence bars are curvy, you might not be able to slide them through the clamp of the old-style stems that were designed for flat bars. I had to convert my Trek's stem to a threadless adapter to use the modern stems that have a removable bolt-on clamp stem.
 

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Get well soon and enjoy! One thing to be aware of: since the Clarence bars are curvy, you might not be able to slide them through the clamp of the old-style stems that were designed for flat bars. I had to convert my Trek's stem to a threadless adapter to use the modern stems that have a removable bolt-on clamp stem.
Good to note, I should of test fitted it when I had the bike apart yesterday. The bike currently has Velo Orange Tourist bars to get upright and that bend went through the clamp fine. It is going to be my recovery bike and is setup to get less weight off my wrist.
 

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Axle to crown length

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View attachment 1119115
I'm having problems uploading pictures, but this is the finished product.
Disk brakes, 1st gen XTR crankset, 29'r conversion by removing the seat stay and chain stay bridges, Salsa fork, Biopace chainring. I had everything for this build just sitting around in my garage except for the Kenda Small Block 8 tires and the riser bar. I love that there are folks out there that appreciate these old Trek Singletrack bikes. I would like to think of this as sort of a restomod, combining old and new, for a one of a kind ride.
I know this thread is old, so hopefully daytonadogie is still following this post. I’m thinking of building a 69er, so I will need a fork that has a similar axle to crown length as the stock suspension fork that was an option on the 990s. I might want a slightly shorter A-C length to allow for fork sag and the extra radius size of the 29” wheel. What Salsa fork did you end-up using? A 26” or 29” fork? Anyone know the A-C length of the stock forks for these bikes?

BTW, I did this same thing on a Trek 7000 several years ago and it worked beautifully, but I used an aluminum cyclocross fork from a Schwinn Fastback (see attached photo).
 

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I have been following this thread for several years or so, and every now and then read the entire thing over again. My interest in these Treks came from wanting an American-made steel frame as the starting foundation for a commuter build. Custom frame builders abound, but I wanted to do more of a budget build (though a US custom made frame would still be incredible). These Treks hit a sweet spot with their availability, price, and quality.

Here is my '96 Trek 990, which I purchased as a neglected old mtb a couple of years ago, and built it up into a reliable, no frills flatbar 700c commuter:










Bike is in a 'rough build' stage, meaning that it is together and I'm still trying various components and parts to fine tune the ride. Once the fine tuning is done, it will be stripped down and completely rebuilt.

The Rock Shox Judy that came with the bike was toast, so I replaced it with a steel 700c cross fork.

Here is the rest of the build:

Dura Ace 7410 cranks
UN-54 BB
ACE ti spindle pedals
XT long cage read derailleur
basic Shimano friction shifter
Dura Ace 8 speed cassette
Velocity wheelset
alloy riser bars
ergo grips
Tekro cross levers
Avid Single Digit 7 v-brakes in front
Campy Chorus dual pivot brake in back
XTR seatpost
Random Orbea saddle
cheap steel headset

It is a bit of a mixmaster at this point, but what a fun bike! The light-ish build and 700c wheels have brought out the qualities of the frame, which I would describe as lively, nimble and smooth. I can ride no handed, but not for long, because it has very quick steering.

Regarding the 700c conversion, I have road bikes and mountain bikes. I don't really notice the BB being higher. If it is, it doesn't present any problems. The biggest issue is the rear brake. Not an issue if you have a custom builder remove rear bosses and braze on new ones, but trying to build it on the cheap means finding a different solution. I drilled out the seatstay bridge to accept a road caliper brake, and find that I get good pad placement right at the very end of the adjustment. However, rear braking is very weak, and I think those cross levers and old brake pads may have a lot to do with it. Obviously dual pivot brakes have proven their decency, so more to work out there.

The bike feels light, but I know it can go a lot lighter. That headset is a brick!

I've been trying to do some research on these older Trek 900 series bikes. It appears as though there were 3 generations:

1989-1993, lugged construction
1994-1997, tig welded, separate seat stays
1998-1999, tig welded, wishbone seat stay design

I couldn't find any Trek 900 series steel-framed bikes in their catalog from 2000. My best guess is that at that point, aluminum and carbon were the most competitive frame material choices and by that point, steel was old news. Feel like I've just begun the research...still so much to learn.

I think the biggest challenge with these frame is the geometry/fit. Decently long top tubes when compared to seat tube length. The head tubes, starting in 1994, were really squished at 85mm for most of the small and medium sizes. It can make getting the handlebars up high enough a bit of work. But it is worth it.

I may be picking up a 3rd gen Trek 930 tomorrow, which still has the triple butted OX tubing, in a different size and we'll see how they compare.
 

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I put a few more purple parts on mine. Purple nips, sealed jockey wheels, skewer set, cable crimps, pads, pedals, and 680mmx25.4mm riser bars.



I realize that this is a ridiculously old post, but what riser bar is that? After a decade away, I'm just getting back into riding, and have both a mid to late-nineties Trek Jetta and Gary Fisher Aquila that I need to put into service.
 

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simply added hydraulic discs an a proper handlebar with a normal reach stem instead of obnoxiously forward...

Now the bike is a good gravel, pub crawl, light duty road, etc... The rear brake frame adapter has been problem free in the duty I've put it to (IOW, no downhilling or bike parks). Yes, that's an adapter on the seat post for my little girl's trail-a-bike.



-Peter
 

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It's an 850 but really wanted to share.

I stumbled across this thread a while ago when I started my 1996 Trek 850 project. I was looking for a high functioning, high end commuter that will blend in at the bike rack and not attract attention to the untrained eye. Added disc tabs, cut off all the braze-ons and added zit-tie cable guides for hydro hoses / full shift housing (a totally fun process!) and outfitted it with bombproff modern parts.

Drivetrain: Sram X9 1x10, 36t ring, 11-36t cassette
Hubs: Rear - Chris King, Front - Phil Wood (BOTH BOLT ON)
BB: Chris King
Headset: Chris King
Cranks: Shimano LX (used)
Rims: Mavic 717
Tires: Maxxis DTH 26 x 2.5
Fork: (different from photos) Redline Monocog Cromo
Brakes: Shimano LX hydro

I put a clear coat over the metal work to show off the scars! didn't want it looking too fresh when it's locked up.

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I finished up a couple of vintage Treks over the last month or so. Both came to me in relatively terrible condition, but they fixed up nicely.

The first is a 1997ish Trek 930. Quite a nice bike, if I must say. Pretty light for a front suspension. It needed a new bottom bracket and headset. But I ended up changing out quite a few parts, and went with a nifty patriotic red/white/blue theme.

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The second is a 1990 lugged steel Trek 950. I kept the wheels and derailleurs, but pretty much everything else was changed out. She was stripped down to the frame, had the paint touched up and frame saver sprayed inside, and completely build back up into what is is today. I freakin' love this bike. Weight is right around 25 pounds exactly.

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Northeast Cruiser

Disclaimer: this is my first bike build. Found a full Trek 930 on Craigslist and loved the metallic paint and lugged steel. I've wanted a cruiser bike for awhile, but hate the look & feel of faux-retro box bikes and thought this frame had some real character. Luckily, I was able to find 1990's Trek catalogues and service manuals on Vintage-Trek.com and determine this was a 1993 - from there I was able to start sourcing parts. I tried to stick to eBay at first, but my vision for the bike won over and I started buying parts. $20 bucks here, $20 bucks there sure adds up quick haha. To be fair, I tried to only buy parts that were on sale... in fact, I found that Brooks B17 saddle on-sale for $78 on Backcountry.com... it was the most expensive piece aside from the tires, which I picked up slightly below retail. Moved to V brakes, which aren't installed this photo as I'm waiting on the silver paint job on brake levers and arms to dry. I'm still waiting on a few finishing pieces for the SS drivetrain and will upload again when complete. Net: this cost a bit more than I initially thought, but by going as far as to service my own free hubs, make a DIY headset press, and completely overhaul a bike I've learned a ton and had fun doing it - was well worth the money. Looking forward to finishing this and riding it when the weather is nicer.

Work-in-progress, but almost done. IMG_5141.jpg
 

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Disclaimer: this is my first bike build. Found a full Trek 930 on Craigslist and loved the metallic paint and lugged steel. I've wanted a cruiser bike for awhile, but hate the look & feel of faux-retro box bikes and thought this frame had some real character. Luckily, I was able to find 1990's Trek catalogues and service manuals on Vintage-Trek.com and determine this was a 1993 - from there I was able to start sourcing parts. I tried to stick to eBay at first, but my vision for the bike won over and I started buying parts. $20 bucks here, $20 bucks there sure adds up quick haha. To be fair, I tried to only buy parts that were on sale... in fact, I found that Brooks B17 saddle on-sale for $78 on Backcountry.com... it was the most expensive piece aside from the tires, which I picked up slightly below retail. Moved to V brakes, which aren't installed this photo as I'm waiting on the silver paint job on brake levers and arms to dry. I'm still waiting on a few finishing pieces for the SS drivetrain and will upload again when complete. Net: this cost a bit more than I initially thought, but by going as far as to service my own free hubs, make a DIY headset press, and completely overhaul a bike I've learned a ton and had fun doing it - was well worth the money. Looking forward to finishing this and riding it when the weather is nicer.

Work-in-progress, but almost done. View attachment 1312113
Sounds like you went the same route as I did, "the expensive learning experience". LOL. My 950, posted above, ended up being way more expensive than I'd planned. So many little bits and parts to be ordered, that added up so quickly. But I tore the whole bike down to the frame, made my own headset removal tool and headset press, and successfully replaced the headset without any screw-ups. I also replaced the vintage bottom bracket with a modern sealed bearing unit.

It was definitely more expensive than I'd planned, and was a lot more work than the initial idea of cleaning and replacing only broken parts. But I ended up with exactly the bike that I envisioned, and I know EVERYTHING about this bike. I know how much grease was applied, which bolts are thread locked, which parts are brand new; all of that stuff. And I got to learn a ton about restoring vintage bikes. So much fun.
 

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95 Trek 930 SHX with Fox F100 RL fork

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Here's my bike which I bought brand new in 95. I haven't ridden it lately until about a year ago. This old thread gave me the idea to replace the Quadra 5 with the 2006 Fox fork ($100 ebay). It is a 100 mm travel but I used internal spacers to keep it at 80 mm. I might try 90 mm travel on the next oil change. Also changed out the stem, wider bars and V brakes because of the fork. 11-32 cassette for easier hill climbs. Still using the 25 year old tires but alas, it is time for new rubber (Nobby Nic). I have to say, I'm very pleased, it is alot of fun riding trails in the SF bay area. About 300 miles so far in the last few months off road. The new fork is a significant improvement. Thanks for all the advice and tips from the forum.
 

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I'm building up a '90 930 single speed cruiser. The digital part of my calipers is broken but it appears the internal diameter of the seat tube is between 26 and 27mm. Is a 26.6 post the correct size? I also see 26.8 posts on ebay...
 

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I'm building up a '90 930 single speed cruiser. The digital part of my calipers is broken but it appears the internal diameter of the seat tube is between 26 and 27mm. Is a 26.6 post the correct size? I also see 26.8 posts on ebay...
My 1990 Trek 950 uses a 26.8 seat post.
 

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I'm building up a '90 930 single speed cruiser. The digital part of my calipers is broken but it appears the internal diameter of the seat tube is between 26 and 27mm. Is a 26.6 post the correct size? I also see 26.8 posts on ebay...
My 1989 Trek 970 uses a 26.8 seat post.
 
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