Mountain Bike Reviews Forum banner
1 - 20 of 21 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
237 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Who else here is running Maxxis Minion 27.5 x 3.8's?
I've got 2,500 miles on mine - all tubeless - and the rears only sidewall threads are showing .. can literally feel and see them.
No it's not due to low psi, I'm running these 9 psi or more, mostly 12psi except really rooty trails those are 9-10 psi.
Will send Maxxis a inquiry, not looking for warranty, but still seems premature defective as the tire knobs themselves are still decent for grip.
Look at my pictures, my other fattie has same tires, 700 ish miles, ran at same psi's, and no sidewall X marks

Framed fattie :




Fatboy fattie


Tread on framed


Tread on Fatboy


Talked about this in Facebook group "Fat Bikes" last fall, then people summarized it was tire folding at low psi … I thought that was plausible explanation but now with it NOT happening on my other fattie I have doubts on that as root cause


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
237 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
On my other fattie, 700 miles in same trails with same psi strategy as shown in the pictures
… zero X marks …
Hence I’m asking others who specifically have these tires their experience.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
This place needs an enema
Joined
·
17,661 Posts
I've ridden those tires. ~1000 miles is a good life for one ridden out back.

At ~1200 miles I'd expect the creased casing you're seeing. At 2500 I'd be beyond stoked it lasted that long, period.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
237 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
I've ridden those tires. ~1000 miles is a good life for one ridden out back.

At ~1200 miles I'd expect the creased casing you're seeing. At 2500 I'd be beyond stoked it lasted that long, period.
I looked and saw nothing in Maxxis website on expectations for tire longevity, hence asked them via their contact us form.
Shared with them my usage and experience on both bikes.

As I'm not a MTB tire durability testing engineer , I don't know their internal testing parameters / stds, so can't judge if my experience is the norm or an outlier.


I've already ordered new fronts and rears.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
471 Posts
Ride the 3.8's - if I got 2500 miles would be very happy as they never last that long. Usually after 1,000 miles mine look like Frankenstein - multiple stitches from sidewall slashes, 2-3 tire plugs, tons of Shoe Glue keeping it all together.

If it cost me $0.04/mile to run a tire, feel thats a good return
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
643 Posts
I get that pattern on my Bontrager tires and my Maxxis tires. Mostly on the back tire though from flexing a lot. It only really shows when in really DRY environments. Come to think of it, my snowshoe 2xl also shows that after adding fresh sealant before winter, as it weeps out the back tire lol.

Have a friend that rides his fat tires until the sidewall rubber is gone and only the fabric remains. Tire still roles.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
237 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 · (Edited)
Well today Sunday is new tire install day, got the rear late yesterday.
The Yellow (individual bought) vs White (from bike supplier).
Actually the cinch backpack it came folded inside is unexpected bonus, cool.


Upon looking at it .. clearly says 8 - 30 psi, like current one .
There's been countless threads on which psi to run for what conditions, based on trail, rider weight, ability, aggressiveness, etc.
I won't re-hash those, except to re-state post 1 …
"I'm running these 9 psi or more, mostly 12psi except really rooty trails those are 9-10 psi."

I will say this, last summer I was riding lots with my 2 sons local trails, I was in better shape. To facilitate me a workout while riding their pace … I did run at 5.5 psi once, but it felt too squirrelly to me, after that then 6.5psi 4-5-6 times, ha it did work definitely I felt the added resistance and it kept my HR in mid 130's. So officially I rode too low psi … and first time I saw the X's.
The local trail was a basic trail, no real rocks / roots to worry about rim strikes.


This tag came with the tires, I've mounted tubeless tires multiple bikes multiple times, but decided to look at Maxxis instructions, could not find them. The QR code took to their main site, not even a support page.


Here's big view if anyone else is curious.


Since I was at their site, I decided to read the warranty terms. It's time based only, nothing about distance used. Guess distance is near impossible to prove / disprove.

"WARRANTY:
Maxxis warrants to the original retail purchaser ("Purchaser") of every new MAXXIS brand bicycle tire, including but not limited to the Maxxis website, and used exclusively in North America ("Tire") that the Tire will be free from defect in material and workmanship for up to one year from date of purchase or until there is no serviceable original tread depth (as determined at the reasonable discretion of Maxxis) remaining on the Tire ("Limited Warranty")."






Recap:
Based on the above, I get it, one year from purchase, either new bike or individual tire.

I won't ever ride below 8psi, that was the very first time I noticed the X, as I was truly folding the sidewalls, possibly I prematurely damaged the outer casing
I take full responsibility for that.

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
WNC Native
Joined
·
4,039 Posts
Biggest contributor in my opinion, is your rim width. That tire on what appears to be around 80mm rims, is going to wear the sidewalls. You got plenty of life out of those tires regardless. A TRUE 4" tire can wear decent on 80mm rims without a lot of sidewall wear, but those tires are a 3.6-3.7 width at best.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
237 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Biggest contributor in my opinion, is your rim width. That tire on what appears to be around 80mm rims, is going to wear the sidewalls. You got plenty of life out of those tires regardless. A TRUE 4" tire can wear decent on 80mm rims without a lot of sidewall wear, but those tires are a 3.6-3.7 width at best.
If you look on their website there is ZERO mention minimum rim width!!

I'd like others to show me if I missed it

I'd never know Maxxis official stance if not bought this replacement tire, it's clearly 75mm minimum, the tire had the cardboard info cling on it.

My 2020 Framed Carbon Alaskan, with their PUB Carbon rims as spec by them, came with these tires. Their rims are 69mm inner rim width.

My 2020 specialized Carbon Fatboy came with these tires also, it's aluminum Stout rim is 75mm ID.



Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
WNC Native
Joined
·
4,039 Posts
If you look on their website there is ZERO mention minimum rim width!!

I'd never know Maxxis official stance if not bought this replacement tire, it's clearly 75mm minimum, the tire had the cardboard info cling on it.

My 2020 Framed Carbon Alaskan, with their PUB Carbon rims as spec by them, came with these tires. Their rims are 69mm inner rim width.

My 2020 specialized Carbon Fatboy came with these tires also, it's rim is 75mm ID.
I don't care what they state the minimum rim width is..... I'm telling based of my own first hand experience with multiple tires and wheelsets. If you ride a 26x3.8 or 27.5x3.8 on i75mm rims on rooty & rocky trails, expect sidewall wear. I ran one of my fat bikes with 26x4.0 Hodag rear and 26x4.7 Barbegazi front tire on Mulefut 80 rims. Wore the sidewalls out on the Hodag and the Barbegazi sidewalls were still flawless.
 

·
Elitest thrill junkie
Joined
·
40,988 Posts
IMO, this is one of the problems with 27.5 3.8 if you are looking for cush. You tend to have to lower the pressure more because the casing is so small, it ends up flexing more and this is one of the results. At slow speed, especially in colder temps, even without snow, it's nice to be able to lower the pressure on a high volume fat tire, to conform to roots and whatever, but at 3.8, your volume is very limited. I relegate 3.8 to racing only. 9psi in the summer, assuming that your pump may be a little off (even accu-gauges are off, they are simple more precise) is still pretty low for summer IME, where roots and stuff will significantly flex the sidewall and tire. Again, I think you are asking too much of a narrower tire. The problem is 27.5 came along and the industry and people thought, "well, now the wheel is bigger, so we don't need as big of a tire because we have more volume as a result of circumference", but while that longer contact patch does help uphill with traction, it's not really doing anything for you with conforming/absorbing little impacts and the normal trail stuff. So it's kind of a catch-22 IMO. Yes, 27.5 does carry a bit more speed and roll over stuff better, but you need the same size tire for the same-type of cush if that was why you were riding a 26" fatbike or one of the things you liked. And then, that bigger tire will be significantly heavier than the 26" setup, since the circumference will be a lot longer now with 27.5, so it will get significantly harder to pedal most likely.
 

·
Rippin da fAt
Joined
·
11,889 Posts
1943136


27.5 x 3.8 on Blizzerk 70's. There are many miles on em without drama. At the typical riding pressure, they will wrinkle easily. Couldn't care less that they do wrinkle easily since ride quality and traction/flotation are number one on the list!

From the starting post, what is going on is continuous wrinkling of the tire. Rider weight and pressure! Remedy is run the pressure stupid high so the tire cannot wrinkle ever but that takes us away from fat in the first place.
 

·
This place needs an enema
Joined
·
17,661 Posts
IMO, this is one of the problems with 27.5 3.8 if you are looking for cush. You tend to have to lower the pressure more because the casing is so small, it ends up flexing more and this is one of the results. At slow speed, especially in colder temps, even without snow, it's nice to be able to lower the pressure on a high volume fat tire, to conform to roots and whatever, but at 3.8, your volume is very limited. I relegate 3.8 to racing only. 9psi in the summer, assuming that your pump may be a little off (even accu-gauges are off, they are simple more precise) is still pretty low for summer IME, where roots and stuff will significantly flex the sidewall and tire. Again, I think you are asking too much of a narrower tire. The problem is 27.5 came along and the industry and people thought, "well, now the wheel is bigger, so we don't need as big of a tire because we have more volume as a result of circumference", but while that longer contact patch does help uphill with traction, it's not really doing anything for you with conforming/absorbing little impacts and the normal trail stuff. So it's kind of a catch-22 IMO. Yes, 27.5 does carry a bit more speed and roll over stuff better, but you need the same size tire for the same-type of cush if that was why you were riding a 26" fatbike or one of the things you liked. And then, that bigger tire will be significantly heavier than the 26" setup, since the circumference will be a lot longer now with 27.5, so it will get significantly harder to pedal most likely.
Wow. We should all probably just stay home and not bother with the hassle of riding.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
643 Posts
True story, I went 27.5 x 3.8 and died.

I got better though.

I do like the larger wheel diameter for trail riding, with my new carbon rims on hopes, im not that much slower than my 27.5+ bike on local trails. More angular momentum and a lower angle of attack does wonders for xc riding.
 

·
Elitest thrill junkie
Joined
·
40,988 Posts
Wow. We should all probably just stay home and not bother with the hassle of riding.
No, we should change wheel sizes every year!
 
1 - 20 of 21 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top