Mountain Bike Reviews Forum banner
1 - 19 of 19 Posts

· Registered
Joined
·
1,859 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My bike has been sitting un-ridden in the basement for a couple of months and I just noticed that both tires have traces of sealant (Stans) all over the sidewalls. I was riding at least once per week since June until I put it away for the winter and never notice sealant coming through the sidewalls.
My basement is around 50 and very dry, mid 30% humidity.
Any ideas?
 

· Registered
Joined
·
1,490 Posts
All of the exo casings I’ve had do this. Exo+ and DD don’t. I’ve since moved on from maxxis and haven’t seen it on any of the new tires I’ve tried


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

· Category Winner
Joined
·
6,131 Posts
I've only been running Maxxis tires (Forekasters in that mix) for about 12 years. Since swapping over to TruckerCo Cream sealant, I've had zero sidewall bleed-through.

And it's done its job time and time again (Forekaster in picture).

Tire Automotive tire Wood Tread Rim
 

· Registered
Joined
·
1,859 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
All the exo and dual compound Maxxis tires I have used do this. I would call it normal.
During use or while the bike is in storage for the winter?

Curiously my sons' bikes are sitting next to mine, 24" x 2.4 DHFs, 26x2.3 DHR IIs, 24" Recon and Snyper, all setup with Stan's and no seepage. My old 26" hardtail is setup tubeless with WTB Vigilante and Velociraptor and Stan's, also no seepage.

I might use the winter to drain them all down, clean them out and re-fill with Orange Seal or Muc-Off.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
1,859 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I just did a quick search on this and found a BikeRumor article on this very topic with info from Stan himself:

Why is there liquid seeping through the sidewalls of my tire after having it sit for awhile, or long after adding the initial sealant? Is it bad? What should I do to avoid/fix it? Does it matter what sealant or tire is used in this case?

Stan’s No Tubes: This starts with the fact that tires, even modern tubeless or tubeless ready, are not perfectly air tight. The liquid you can see seeping through sidewalls or occasionally old puncture sites is generally one or more of the ingredients used as a preservative or “longevity enhancer.” For the majority of sealants currently on the market, that ingredient is often some form of glycol or glycerine (clear liquids, oily in nature) as they typically blend well with natural or synthetic latex and are hygroscopic in nature. As the latex or coagulant begins to dry, the remaining elements continue to find tiny pores or imperfections in the tires that leads to the seeping look.

Basically no, it’s not bad and won’t hurt anything. It’s not a great look we’ll admit, and we are continuously looking at our own formulations as well as those of the competition. In the end we have a few goals – first, sealant has to seal, bottom line, second, we are looking to balance longevity with puncture protection. Sealant that doesn’t have decent longevity and user friendly characteristics is a painful product to work with and if you don’t have good puncture protection, see point 1.

You’ll find, if you haven’t already, that many sealants on the market exhibit some type of seeping just as you’ll find that some tire makers or some types of tire construction are more or less susceptible.

 

· Registered
Joined
·
74 Posts
I just did a quick search on this and found a BikeRumor article on this very topic with info from Stan himself:

Why is there liquid seeping through the sidewalls of my tire after having it sit for awhile, or long after adding the initial sealant? Is it bad? What should I do to avoid/fix it? Does it matter what sealant or tire is used in this case?

Stan’s No Tubes: This starts with the fact that tires, even modern tubeless or tubeless ready, are not perfectly air tight. The liquid you can see seeping through sidewalls or occasionally old puncture sites is generally one or more of the ingredients used as a preservative or “longevity enhancer.” For the majority of sealants currently on the market, that ingredient is often some form of glycol or glycerine (clear liquids, oily in nature) as they typically blend well with natural or synthetic latex and are hygroscopic in nature. As the latex or coagulant begins to dry, the remaining elements continue to find tiny pores or imperfections in the tires that leads to the seeping look.

Basically no, it’s not bad and won’t hurt anything. It’s not a great look we’ll admit, and we are continuously looking at our own formulations as well as those of the competition. In the end we have a few goals – first, sealant has to seal, bottom line, second, we are looking to balance longevity with puncture protection. Sealant that doesn’t have decent longevity and user friendly characteristics is a painful product to work with and if you don’t have good puncture protection, see point 1.

You’ll find, if you haven’t already, that many sealants on the market exhibit some type of seeping just as you’ll find that some tire makers or some types of tire construction are more or less susceptible.

I've have the exact same thing happen with an old Schwalbe Pro One road tire and Orange Seal (regular and endurance). It's a rear tire that has about 6 months and 3,000 miles on it, and it's ready for the bin (I can see the cords on the tread), but it's seeping pretty badly. Here's the weird/funny thing, though: sealant is getting, but air isn't! At least at a rate that is any higher than it did before it started weeping.So I agree this is one of these "nothing to worry about" things. I don't think this is a Stan's thing as much as a "tire age" thing.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
411 Posts
I also get ooze on my MTB, I started tubeless on my gravel... Specialized Pathfinder Pros and OS endurance, no ooze, even after sitting 4 months. Whereas on my MTB, Maxxis DHF Exo, starts to ooze after a few days. Maxxis Aggressor Exo, no oozing. Unknown sealant in those since it was bought used.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
1,650 Posts
I've had it happen with several tires, some more so than others but mainly with maxxis and vittoria. Some start a few days after being installed while others take months before they start to weep sealant but other than being messy they still perform just fine.
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top