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I've got one that I've used a wee bit for that... It's kinda heavy and overkill for cruising the trails... No doubt that it's completely bombproof... Mavic markets it as "extreme" it's much heavier then my singletracks....
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I'm using these switching from my Mavic XM 321 wheelset and didn't notice much of a weight gain at all, I'm also using basically the same set up, using Shimano Deore XT (they work for me) I think the EX 729 is around a 100 grams heavier than the XM 321.

Another thing I like is that you can use 2.1 tires on them, which will make the wider and not so rounded so you have more usable traction so you can go faster.
 

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Holy crap! :eek: You must subscribe to the "medicine ball" theory of training. ;)

I've had pretty good luck bashing my Mavic 819 all-mountain rims around the eastern Canadian shield trails. The UST double box makes for a really strong rim without the unnecessary fat. Just to qualify my use - I don't huck anything bigger than 3' -4' on trails and I only weigh 145 lbs - i.e. I'm not saying all clydesdales will be fine bombing rocky DH and throwing down all of the freeride options with these rims. I also have a pair of the old 521 CD DH rims with Maxxis High Rollers and they're pigs to push around the trails compared to the 819s. Rotating mass is killer on your efficiency. And yes - you will notice 200 g savings per rim (nearly 1/2 pound) x 2 wheels. Combine lighter rims with a pair of much lower rolling resistance tubeless tires (or DIY rim strips + regular tires) and you'll be flying on the trails compared to your DH wheelset.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I'd think it'd be necessary over here in Japan, the trails here can get treacherous from time to time, especially after it's rained, the clay get really slick :eek: , like today it had rained like 2 days ago and my tires were getting completely caked with mud, and the trail that I rode was pretty difficult, I was sliding everywhere, I guess the fact that I'm using comp versions of WTB tires wasn't helping very much :D .
 

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WeylessXPRider said:
I'd think it'd be necessary over here in Japan, the trails here can get treacherous from time to time, especially after it's rained, the clay get really slick :eek: , like today it had rained like 2 days ago and my tires were getting completely caked with mud, and the trail that I rode was pretty difficult, I was sliding everywhere, I guess the fact that I'm using comp versions of WTB tires wasn't helping very much :D .
Hmmm. Caked mud on tires sounds more like a tire selection issue than a rim issue. I used to use WTB Weirwolves with reasonable results in general but found them to be lacking for muddy trail riding and absolutely brutal for muddy DH, especially the clay variety. Lots of understeering and rear wheel slippage in turns. To be honest, there are no miracles - not much will save your a$$ in saturated clay other than a solid line and hands off the brakes. For what it's worth, a number of top-rated freeride and DH pros go with Maxxis High Rollers and Minion DH for crazy muddy riding North Shore style - steep and muddy. I've got them on my DH bike and have used them on my Heckler in super-gnarly conditions with better results than otherwise expected. They're a safe bet.
 

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I use the 729s. Really heavy compared to my XC rims but my Heckler is built up for abusive use. I weigh a bit over 200lbs with all my gear and I really don't want to deal with tweaked rims. So far, these rims have dealt with anything I've thrown at it.
 
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