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Do It Yourself
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5,720 Posts
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From the animated picture on Maverick's website, it looks like a harsh ride. With the seat fixed, you can see the bottom braket move with rear wheel movement. Seems like you would feel every bump in the pedals. With a standard non-URT design, suspension movement doesn't move the bb with respect to the seat. Any comments from the pundits or Maverick riders?

 

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The Ancient One
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1,573 Posts
Homebrew said:
From the animated picture on Maverick's website, it looks like a harsh ride. With the seat fixed, you can see the bottom braket move with rear wheel movement. Seems like you would feel every bump in the pedals. With a standard non-URT design, suspension movement doesn't move the bb with respect to the seat. Any comments from the pundits or Maverick riders?
It's basically a MacStrut with the bottom bracket mounted on the lower link instead of on the main frame.

Pedaling tends to extend the suspension, but, because the rider's weight shifts to the pedals during the power phase of the stroke, the BB is prevented from rising and the bike doesn't bob.

This also means the suspension is partially deactivated during the power phase of the stoke or if the rider stands up at all on the pedals during a descent..

Not my cup of tea but some people love it.
 

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Gentleman Loser
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427 Posts
I like mine

Well, I've been riding a Maverick ML-7 since summer 2001.

As people are fond of noting, and correctly so, the suspension does stiffen when riding out of the saddle.

Some pros, not a complete set, and in no particular order:

- The chassis is quite stiff, so it steers and tracks quite well.

- It's wheelbase changes little as front and rear suspension compresses, so the bike remains stable in most conditions... Even while blasting through rock fields at ramming speed.

- Though not plush like some, the suspension mutes all but the worst impacts.

- The suspension creates massive amounts of grip while climbing.

- It doesn't bob while pedaling.

- There's enough clearance in the rear triangle for muddy 2.4" tires.

- What I think MOST important is that this chassis gives its riders a lot of predictable, useful feedback. It is well mannered, and neutral.

For a while, I planned to buy a "more burly" four-bar frame as my big mountain bike.

Then, I rode with Paul Turner and Mark Howe on some big, sometimes scary trails such as UPS-Porcupine in Moab and JMB in Boulder.

I'm a pretty good rider. Really good actually. But, you know, I thought time was going to reverse when those guys pulled away from me on their Mavericks.

Then I saw the fallacy at the core of my thinking. There's nothing wrong with my bike.

It's a great bike. And my Kung Fu, though masterful, can still use some improvement.

Respect. ;)

Tommy
 

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www.derbyrims.com
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6,766 Posts
Agree, and it's very effective.

Steve from JH said:
It's basically a MacStrut with the bottom bracket mounted on the lower link instead of on the main frame.

Pedaling tends to extend the suspension, but, because the rider's weight shifts to the pedals during the power phase of the stroke, the BB is prevented from rising and the bike doesn't bob.

This also means the suspension is partially deactivated during the power phase of the stoke or if the rider stands up at all on the pedals during a descent..

Not my cup of tea but some people love it.
The Maverick is a semi-active suspension hidden in a virtual 4-bar (Mac Strut) Unified Rear Triangle (URT) suspension.

URT's are somewhat under rated. They can be designed, as this one is, to be very low on bob without any noticeable pedal kickback, for a very snappy climber with high traction even through rougher conditions. Most other low pedal kickback designs require added reactive platform damping for good pedaling efficiency. The problem or tradeoff in the positive effects of URT is the stiffening when standing on the pedals, which is good for hard pedaling, but the suspension can't relax for full travel compliance when standing and coasting over rocks.

The Maverick uses a Mac Strut, virtual 4-bar (long story) linkage, which reduces the URT stiffening to a less dramatic and more moderate semi-active transition when standing. And when seated there is still some chain-tension semi-active pedal pressure stiffening effect so the seated-verses-standing transition becomes rather seamless. Compared to a monopivot URT, rear braking effect is less compressive in geometry using the Maverick's mac-strut 4-bar design suspension (allowing the rear spring and suspension to relax into a more bump compliant range), so traction should remain good at the rear wheel when braking as the rider weight is shifted to the front wheel.

It all adds up to a very effective raceable trailbike design. I haven't heard any Maverick owners complain about its performance.

- ray
 

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Banned
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7,131 Posts
The maverick is simply a recent incarnation of an old (giant i think?) DH bike that was designed by Paul Turner, it works on the same principle. It's a semi-URT, also similer to the I-drive, where the BB area moves at a pretty small ratio compared to the rear suspension.

As with most things, it's nothing new, circa 1995 or so I believe :)
 
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