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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Have been running some MAGURA MATRA S.L. ,s for a few years now - theyre FANTASTC brakes Small - light - nice colour - stop me well - easy to maintain - cheep enough new pads etc - all sounds great , BUT the levers are rubbish they are cheepo looking metal / alloy - they jiggle about in their housing making an awfull racket , so much so that I now ride with my two fingers on the levers way more than I ever did , just to keep the noise down ., they look like something off a halfords £200 chav special and theyre about a foot long. OR I could change to the Carbon levers which are slightly shorter and dont rattle & jiggle but snap off at every oportunity !!! and they aint cheep to replace ! .
This is a £300 quid quality brake set up and you,d expect something a bit more profesional.
I was out riding with a mate who had some hope M4,s and the enjineering quality fit and feel of the CNC machined lever put my piece of bent metal to shame, is there owt I can do - am planning a new build and the matras performance everywere else ticks all my boxes but... OH THOSE CHEEP N NASTY LEVERS ?????? Carmine Bicycle part Cylinder Motorcycle accessories Machine
carbon option = brittle

Bicycle part Red Line Black Circle


Line Machine Scientific instrument Cylinder Silver
not the best picture but look at the thickness - the modulation felt slick smooth and connected
 

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I have had no problems with my Martas but am wondering what your question was.
 

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I'm with you on the levers. Have a pair on a bike I just bought used and love'em, except for the damn lever rattle. I figured a new bushing kit would take the play out, so I picked one up and went to install it last night. I had a hell of a time keeping the piston down and it popped out at one point, finally got the new bushings in and they didn't help at all. Resetting the piston into the master cylinder also seemed to give me a nice little unfixable leak. All in all, I spent $10 to destroy my lever. I might be checking out some hopes myself.
 

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Allow me to chime in with my Marta SL's. I've got the opposite problem, my levers/bushings fit too tight in the housing causing the levers to stick and not return easily. If I don't clean and lube every day and even then, they always stick. It's almost like Magura needs to put a spring in there to insure proper lever return. Hell, my wifes ellcheepo juicy 3's never stick and return flawlessly.

IMO a brake that is priced at this level shouldn't have any problems. I love the quiet stopping power and the looks of it so it's either except the faults or start looking for a differant brake.

I guess being a weight winnie has it's drawbacks

Mojo
 

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Magura N. America Svc Mgr
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Hey guys and sorry for the issues with the levers.

First, What Twedspeed describes sounds like the Alloy levers have become sloppy over time and riding.
That can easily be rectified by re-spreading the allow "ears" that house the bushings and contact the alloy master cylinder body. ( increasing the tolerance)
Over time, those "ears" bend inward due to braking while hitting braking bumps and your hand and fingers naturally leverage the levers up and down slightly.

There are several ways to go about this fix. With the lever blade fully installed, fit a proper size flat blade screw driver (as if you are adjusting the lever blade position) and pry the "ears" outward so they fit tighter in the master body.
This works in a pinch and quickly but the best way to go about the fix is to:

Remove the adjuster bolt completely and drop the plastic barrel downward and out of the way. ( you don't have to retain the piston)
Now with the plastic adjuster barrel and screw removed, pivot the lever blade out as to expose those "ears" where you can grab one at a time with a pair of pliers or needle nose and gently shape the allow pieces back to original position.

As for the Carbon blade, you must remove the blade completely, (make sure to retain the piston) clean and then re-lube the contact surfaces to reduce the friction there and where they contact the plastic pivots. The carbon blades are so stiff and are made differently from the alloy versions so they never bend or flex like the alloy models described above.
 

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It seems that when you have a nice slop free lever fit, the piston dosen't have enough presure to keep the levers fully and quickly returned. Even with excessive cleaning and lubing (which I'm a nut case about) the levers don't return as well as they should. Luckly the poor lever return does not cause any caliper/shoe drag on the rotor.

What's the best way to remove the pistion for lever cleaning and lubing :confused:

Mojo
 

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Magura N. America Svc Mgr
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Mojo, you must be asking about carbon lever blades being slow to return?

If so, you are correct that sometimes it seems simply lubing the pivot area does little.
So you should completely remove the lever blade to do a real proper job.
Retain the piston by first positioning the Master Cylinder vertically, notice a 2 mm hole on the underside of the MC, remove the caliper from the frame or the wheel from the drop outs (this allows the brake pads to move closer than the rotor would normally allow), squeeze the lever blade to the handle bar and insert a 2 mm allen wrench or spoke into that 2 mm hole. This retains the master piston by resting on the pistons shoulder.
Now you can wiggle and pick the two plastic pivots through the bottom of the MC body and remove the carbon blade.
Clean real well and lube all pivoting contact points with a light fluid (not grease) and replace.

In extreme cases, you can make more room in the alloy housing to fit the blade by making more room but this is rarely recommended.

Push the brake pads apart after releasing the master piston.
 

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Mojo, you must be asking about carbon lever blades being slow to return?

If so, you are correct that sometimes it seems simply lubing the pivot area does little.
So you should completely remove the lever blade to do a real proper job.
Retain the piston by first positioning the Master Cylinder vertically, notice a 2 mm hole on the underside of the MC, remove the caliper from the frame or the wheel from the drop outs (this allows the brake pads to move closer than the rotor would normally allow), squeeze the lever blade to the handle bar and insert a 2 mm allen wrench or spoke into that 2 mm hole. This retains the master piston by resting on the pistons shoulder.
Now you can wiggle and pick the two plastic pivots through the bottom of the MC body and remove the carbon blade.
Clean real well and lube all pivoting contact points with a light fluid (not grease) and replace.

In extreme cases, you can make more room in the alloy housing to fit the blade by making more room but this is rarely recommended.

Push the brake pads apart after releasing the master piston.
Thanks loads, will try a proper cleaning and lubing

Mojo :thumbsup:
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Hey guys and sorry for the issues with the levers.

First, What Twedspeed describes sounds like the Alloy levers have become sloppy over time and riding.
That can easily be rectified by re-spreading the allow "ears" that house the bushings and contact the alloy master cylinder body. ( increasing the tolerance)
Over time, those "ears" bend inward due to braking while hitting braking bumps and your hand and fingers naturally leverage the levers up and down slightly.

There are several ways to go about this fix. With the lever blade fully installed, fit a proper size flat blade screw driver (as if you are adjusting the lever blade position) and pry the "ears" outward so they fit tighter in the master body.
This works in a pinch and quickly but the best way to go about the fix is to:

Remove the adjuster bolt completely and drop the plastic barrel downward and out of the way. ( you don't have to retain the piston)
Now with the plastic adjuster barrel and screw removed, pivot the lever blade out as to expose those "ears" where you can grab one at a time with a pair of pliers or needle nose and gently shape the allow pieces back to original position.

As for the Carbon blade, you must remove the blade completely, (make sure to retain the piston) clean and then re-lube the contact surfaces to reduce the friction there and where they contact the plastic pivots. The carbon blades are so stiff and are made differently from the alloy versions so they never bend or flex like the alloy models described above.
WOW thanks so much for answering I havent had chance to try out your repair yet , but that is fantastic customer care I,m really impressed. :D :) :thumbsup: ;) :D :thumbsup: :) ;)
 
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