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Reformed car junkie
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194 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I need to make a heat sink for the 44mm headtubes. Either I am really bad at using the search function or it has never come up on MTBR so im trying to figure out what materials work well for heat sinks and what I should stay away from.

I have purchased heat sinks from Paragon and Sputnik, but I have a lathe now so I would much rather make my own.

The paragon site says theirs is made of 510 bronze. I found it online and its rather expensive. That being said if its the best material I have no problem opening the wallet up. But if there something else out there that will work as well im open to options.

Thanks in advance.
 

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Shamisen Appreciator
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2,100 Posts
I need to make a heat sink for the 44mm headtubes. Either I am really bad at using the search function or it has never come up on MTBR so im trying to figure out what materials work well for heat sinks and what I should stay away from.

I have purchased heat sinks from Paragon and Sputnik, but I have a lathe now so I would much rather make my own.

The paragon site says theirs is made of 510 bronze. I found it online and its rather expensive. That being said if its the best material I have no problem opening the wallet up. But if there something else out there that will work as well im open to options.

Thanks in advance.
That 510 bronze is hard as eff to machine cleanly with most home-shop sized lathes (I include SB heavy ten in that category). I got my bronze from Enco, at the time they called it SI Bronze. It's not oil impregnated and I got it cored to save a bit of $$ since I was going to drill it out anyway.
 

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Reformed car junkie
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194 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
That 510 bronze is hard as eff to machine cleanly with most home-shop sized lathes (I include SB heavy ten in that category). I got my bronze from Enco, at the time they called it SI Bronze. It's not oil impregnated and I got it cored to save a bit of $$ since I was going to drill it out anyway.
Thank you for the heads up on the 510, if its too hard for a heavy 10 I would probably have some issues. Thanks.

Time to start more hunting around. Thank you.
 

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Premium Member
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7,491 Posts
My solution

I just purchased (or maybe I already had them sitting around, can't remember) some Cannondale headshok-to-1 1/8 adapter cups and turned them down on the lathe to fit the 44mm ID of the head tube stock. Works well enough that I have essentially zero distortion, and doubles as an easy adapter for my Anvil fixture. Total cost was maybe $10.

Note that I'm working with steel. For ti, I think the aluminum might be a bad idea, but I'm no expert on ti.

-Walt
 

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Reformed car junkie
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194 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I just purchased (or maybe I already had them sitting around, can't remember) some Cannondale headshok-to-1 1/8 adapter cups and turned them down on the lathe to fit the 44mm ID of the head tube stock. Works well enough that I have essentially zero distortion, and doubles as an easy adapter for my Anvil fixture. Total cost was maybe $10.

Note that I'm working with steel. For ti, I think the aluminum might be a bad idea, but I'm no expert on ti.

-Walt
That is a rather interesting idea, a few chunks of Al would sure a lot more cost effective. Im welding steel also, maybe ill give something like your recomending first and If I have issues go for some bronze. Thanks!
 

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Shamisen Appreciator
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2,100 Posts
Thank you for the heads up on the 510, if its too hard for a heavy 10 I would probably have some issues. Thanks.

Time to start more hunting around. Thank you.
It's not that it's too hard, it's too "grabby". When I had a go with it, I couldn't find a feed or speed that gave a half way decent surface finish. It wanted to tear more than cut. I think you need ultra sharp tools and some serious power + rigidity to machine it.

The SI Bronze essentially turns into 1x 1mm square chips. I hooked up a vacuum next to the cutting tool to keep them from flying everywhere.
 

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Plays with tools
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4,656 Posts
That is a rather interesting idea, a few chunks of Al would sure a lot more cost effective. Im welding steel also, maybe ill give something like your recomending first and If I have issues go for some bronze. Thanks!
I've always made heat sinks out of aluminum. It's way easier to come by than bronze/brass it machines easy and it works pretty damn well in my experience. My seat tube heat sink is just an old and cheap seat post that I cut in half length wise, works perfectly took ten minutes to make and was free. When it comes to heat sinks keep it simple.
 

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Registered
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I made some out of brass. Machined well, and was cheap. Keep a vacume handy when turning on the lathe though, as it gets everywhere.

Here's my bottom bracket heat sink.

 

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Reformed car junkie
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194 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks for chiming in everybody, Lots of good info presented and some stuff to keep in mind going forward.

I think im going to start with some Aluminum and see how that goes.

Thanks again.
 

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Non Dual Bliss
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6,240 Posts
Be careful using aluminum for a heat sink; there be monsters there.

Copper is the material of choice. Cost more, but works like gold.
 

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Reformed car junkie
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194 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Be careful using aluminum for a heat sink; there be monsters there.

Copper is the material of choice. Cost more, but works like gold.
Hmmmm, now im doubting my choice. I had some reasons (excuses maybe) in my head for going with AL. Might have to rethink them.

Does AL not have as much ability to absorb the heat from welding or something like the potential to contaminate the backside of the weld?

Thank you.
 

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Non Dual Bliss
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6,240 Posts
There's a couple of things about aluminum. One, it's melting temp is significantly lower than brass and 50N and pretty close to 45 & 56 so you lug & fillet guys have to watch your heat around it. Second is that it can off gas locally under a weld and cause problems, especially on reactive and absorptive metals like Ti and SS. I'd use it on steel tubes for occasional use when tig welding, but if you're going go to the trouble of making a real heat sink, then I'd use a more appropriate material like brass or copper or I'd just buy one from Paragon or Sputnik if you need one for a standard application.
 

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The cat's name is jake
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274 Posts
You can machine phosphor bronze (I think that is what you are referring to as 510) with a sharp HSS tool. Use a diamond lap or some such to finish the cutter if you don't have a T&C grinder. Don't try to first machine it with something dull - if you try to cut and it ain't workin' for ya, it ain't gonna get any better. You'll work harden the outside something fierce, and then have a helluva time getting through that once you have a sharp tool.

Alternatively, use brass.
 
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