Mountain Bike Reviews Forum banner
1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,129 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'd like to incorporate deep tissue massage into my riding routine. When is the best time? Immediately after a hard ride/race, the day after, the day before? Anything that the masseuse should know or do in particular? Thanks for any advice.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
629 Posts
I may be way off here (and I've never had a deep tissue massage), but I thought I read they were extremely painfull (in a bodybuilding mag). They showed several pics of a guy getting one and he was grimmacing in pain in all of them. He said he felt like he got beat up afterwards. After all, you will be tearing and loosening up scar tissue in the muscle, but in a good way.

So all I can say is that before a race/ride seems like a bad idea. If the masseuse needs input on how to do one, I'd find a more "sports" oriented one that knows what they are doing.

Wish I still had that article, but I think I tossed it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
629 Posts
Got a little more info. Do a search for the Graston-Hall Method, they include special tools and scrapers for deep tissue massage. The massage should be done in the direction of the muscle fibers to break down and seperate the cross fiber scar tissue.

I'm still finding that this massage seems to be more affiliated with bodybuilders and strength athletes, due to lots of scar tissue from weight lifting and growth. But that's because I know where those types of sites are. You may have better luck or find the info you are looking for.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
215 Posts
Occasionally I'll get a huge knot in my calf or have a lot of lactic acid in my quads. My wife will give me a deep tissue massage to work it out, and yes if it is done right it is indeed painful. I'm grimmacing and howling like a baby the whole time but after she gets done I'm much improved.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
683 Posts
Me too

I also get knots in my calf muscles...my new GF just happens to know how to work it out...and my legs have never felt better...only after I screamed like a girl while she worked them out.

ChipAllen said:
Occasionally I'll get a huge knot in my calf or have a lot of lactic acid in my quads. My wife will give me a deep tissue massage to work it out, and yes if it is done right it is indeed painful. I'm grimmacing and howling like a baby the whole time but after she gets done I'm much improved.
 

·
Don't worry, be happy!
Joined
·
8,141 Posts
Impy, you'll want to ask around for massage therapists that specialize or are at least familiar with working with atheletes. We have a gal here in town that is so good she is booked solid always, and doens't take insurance. My understanding is that the deep massage also helps flush waste material out of the muscles post event, and can help awaken the muscles prior to an event.

Three Areas of Sports Massage

Sports massage may involve prevention and maintenance programs, on-site treatment before and after an athletic event, and rehabilitation programs for those who are injured during the program.
Maintenance Massage

An effective maintenance program is based on the massage therapist's understanding of anatomy and kinesiology, combined with an expert knowledge of which muscles are used in a given sport and which are likely candidates for trouble. By zeroing in on particular muscle groups and working specific tissues, the sports massage therapist can help the athlete maintain or improve range of motion and muscle flexibility. The overall objective of a maintenance program is to help the athlete reach optimal performance through injury-free training.
Event Massage

Pre-event. Pre-event sports massage is given within the four hours preceding an event to improve performance and help decrease injuries. It is used as a supplement to an athlete's warm-up to enhance circulation and reduce excess muscle and mental tension prior to competition. It is normally shorter (10-15 minutes) than a regular conditioning massage, and focuses on warming-up the major muscles to be used, and getting the athlete in a good mental state for competition. It also improves tissue pliability, readying the athlete for top performance. Certain massage techniques can help calm a nervous athlete, and others can be stimulating. Pre-event. Pre-event sports massage is given within the four hours preceding an event to improve performance and help decrease injuries. It is used as a supplement to an athlete's warm-up to enhance circulation and reduce excess muscle and mental tension prior to competition. It is normally shorter (10-15 minutes) than a regular conditioning massage, and focuses on warming-up the major muscles to be used, and getting the athlete in a good mental state for competition. It also improves tissue pliability, readying the athlete for top performance. Certain massage techniques can help calm a nervous athlete, and others can be stimulating.

Inter/Intra-event.

Inter- and intra-event massage is given between events or in time-outs to help athletes recover from the preceding activity, and prepare for the activity coming up. It is also short, and focuses on the major muscles stressed in the activity. Inter- and intra-event massage is given between events or in time-outs to help athletes recover from the preceding activity, and prepare for the activity coming up. It is also short, and focuses on the major muscles stressed in the activity.
Post-event.

Post-event sports massage is given after a competition and is mainly concerned with recovery. It is geared toward reducing the muscle spasms and metabolic build-up that occur with vigorous exercise. Recovery after competition involves not only tissue normalization and repair, but also general relaxation and mental calming. A recovery session might be 15 minutes to 11/2 hours in length. Post-event sports massage is given after a competition and is mainly concerned with recovery. It is geared toward reducing the muscle spasms and metabolic build-up that occur with vigorous exercise. Recovery after competition involves not only tissue normalization and repair, but also general relaxation and mental calming. A recovery session might be 15 minutes to 11/2 hours in length.
Rehabilitation Massage

Even with preventive maintenance, muscles cramp, tear, bruise, and ache. Sports massage can speed healing and reduce discomfort during the rehabilitation process.

Soft tissue techniques employed by sports massage therapists are effective in the management of both acute and chronic injuries. For example, adding lymphatic massage to the "standard care" procedure in the acute stage of injury will improve control of secondary, hypoxic injury and enhance edemous fluid removal throughout the healing cycle. Trigger point techniques reduce the spasms and pain that occur both in the injured and "compensation" muscles. Cross-fiber friction techniques applied during the subacute and maturation phases of healing improve the formation of strong and flexible repair tissue, which is vital in maintaining full pain-free range of motion during rehabilitation.

In all cases, such massage techniques are employed in collaboration with other appropriate medical care. For example, encouraging circulation around a bruise, but not directly on it, through the use of compression, cross-fiber techniques or even long, deep strokes is only used after appropriate medical referral and diagnostics indicate that there are no clots formed in the area which may embolize.
from http://www.holistic-online.com/massage/mas_sports.htm
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
397 Posts
Empirically speaking...

I think deep tissue massage does have it's positive benefits.

The following is what I learned from rock climbing.

When I'm preparing for a climb that's at my absolute limit (and I really really want to tick this climb off my list), I'll get deep tissue work done with most of the focus on the forearms, biceps, and back.

The deep tissue works out the knots. It also clears the lactic acid.

Afterwards, I'll drink plenty of water to flush the toxins out. I'll also be careful to go easy on caffeine and alcohol.

Then I'll rest an additional day or two. On my last rest day, I'll climb lightly to wake the body up. This is similar to many mtb racers going for a short ride the day before a race.

On "fight day" I notice a significant improvement in how I perform.

I think it will help greatly if the massage therapist participates in the same sport as you. They will simply be more tuned in to your particular needs.

I also think it is very important to have at least one rest (or easy) day after the deep tissue work.
 

·
Lazy People Suck
Joined
·
771 Posts
Anyone using "the Stick" massager?

While not as good as a full massage, I have one of the roller type massagers with a grip on each end, named brand "The Stick". I can say that if a use it after a hard ride to roll out my legs, they definitely feel fresher with less soreness the next day. It has become my normal to routine to use it the evening after a hard ride and to drink plenty of water to flush out the toxins that I have hopefully worked out.

They market to cyclists as I bought my massager at Interbike a couple of years ago and I think it was worth the $20.00 I paid for it.
 

·
i worship Mr T
Joined
·
5,543 Posts
Impy said:
I'd like to incorporate deep tissue massage into my riding routine. When is the best time? Immediately after a hard ride/race, the day after, the day before? Anything that the masseuse should know or do in particular? Thanks for any advice.
hey girl.

i've used deep muscle massage (in the form of Active Release Therapy) as part of my training. i would not recommend doing it either the day before or the day after a hard ride/race for all the reasons others have suggested. it can hurt like h3ll - especially on muscles that are already sore from a hard ride/race, and it is designed to clear lactic acid and other toxins so it can counterintuitively leave you feeling sore afterward. as 514Climber suggested it's good to take an easy day after the massage and drink lots of fluids.

when i was doing it last year if i had a race on sunday i would go in for the massage on thurs, take friday off and then do my easy pre-ride on sat. it seemed to work wel on that schedule.

unfortunately my massage guy changed clinics and they no longer take my insurance so i am massage free this year. :(

rt
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top